Codraroll

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About Codraroll

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  1. But... isn't the roc a bird capable of flight? So far, all the SpaceY engines have been named after flightless birds. So I think the logical step for the 5 m engine would be "Ostrich", and if the need to go any further ever arose, I guess "Terrorbird" would be a pretty neat name for those.
  2. If I were to guess: If it is the latter, no problem. If it is the former, wait three days, and then somebody will have made an "Ambient Light Adjustment Hotkeys" mod.
  3. Does the limit of 300 words include the title? If so, I have to edit both of mine, if not they are both fine.
  4. Somewhere I read the golden rule of announced future spaceflights: "Everything announced beyond two years is a wild guess and is just as likely never to happen. Everything within two years will be delayed by 50 % from the latest announcement."
  5. Since we're allowed to submit multiple entries, why not try again? This one is about timewarp. "Revolutionary" spaceprobe behind space program halt For years, neighbours to the Kerbal Space Center had to get used to bustling activity, with around-the-clock construction, rocket launches, experimental engine tests and vigorous astronaut recruitment programs. After its initial construction, the entire complex went through multiple refurbishments and expansions within a few weeks, and press releases suggested frequent and enormous advances in aviation, electronics, orbital maneuvering, long-distance communication and rocket science almost daily. However, after the launch of the spacecraft Jool Explorer two years ago, the KSC has gone eerily silent. Not a single rocket has been launched to supply or service the space stations and munar surface bases that were built over a span of weeks two years ago. No plane has taken off from or landed at the KSC runway. No new designs have been constructed, no new science reports published, astronauts hired, or contracts negotiated after Jool Explorer left the launchpad. "Of course we will honour our existing contracts," says Gene Kerman, head of the KSC Mission Control. "They all had very generous deadlines, so right now we decided to shift our focus onto something else. We will come back to them later and complete them within the agreed timeframe." Kerman continues: "The Kerbal Space Program continues unabated. For the moment, our entire focus is on the Jool probe. We're committed to continue the space program with the same intensity as we always have, but right now we're waiting for Jool Explorer to reach its target." Kerman has little to say regarding the silence at the KSC. "We can bring in the rest of the guys on short notice, but why? Until the scheculed correction burn in a year and a half, we have no activities planned. We'll notify the press and our business partners when we are ready to focus on work Kerbinside again." 298 words + 6 in the title.
  6. Might as well write an entry based on an experience I had in-game myself. I hope the 300 word limit excludes the article title (this is 305 words counting the title, 295 without it). FIRST DUNA MISSION STUCK IN ORBIT, UNABLE TO GET HOME It is now a year since the crew of the interplanetary spacecraft Duna Express departed Kerbin orbit in the direction of Duna. Yesterday, Public Relations representative at the Kerbal Space Center, Walt Kerman, announced to the press that the landing craft Dunamite I had landed successfully on Duna, and that astronaut Jebediah Kerman had made Kerbalkind's first footprints on the Dunian sand. At a press conference this morning, Kerman could announce that Dunamite I had safely rendezvouzed with the Duna Express mothership, but made no mention of the projected return trip. When pressed on the issue, Kerman admitted that Duna Express had run out of fuel while making orbit around Duna, and therefore could not return to Kerbin on its own. "Listen," Kerman said after the commotion had died down, "This is the first time we've used the LV-N 'Nerv' Atomic Rocket Motors. On the box they came in, it said they were perfect for interplanetary travel, but apparently they didn't perform quite like expected. We're now trying to contact the manufacturer." Lead scientist at the KSC, Werner von Kerman, elaborates on the issue. "Apparently, we had forgotten to drain the ship's fuel tanks of unneeded oxidizer before departure." Von Kerman did not comment on why the fuel tanks were filled with oxidizer in the first place. The Kerbal Space Center is already planning a rescue mission to bring the stranded astronauts home. Plans involve building a second Duna Express ship without the attached landing craft, which will rendezvous with the astronauts in Duna Orbit and take them home. Von Kerman assures the public that they will remember to drain the oxidizer this time. The stranded astronauts were not available for interviews, but sent a short statement where they consider their calamity ”an unexpected vacation”.
  7. Yes, but those who need it aren't likely to be following KSP's official information outlets yet, seeing as they're all currently in English. "In a week, we'll post something which will be very exciting for many of you! Namely, those among us who can't understand English, who can't enjoy KSP because the language barrier prevents them from playing the game properly, or looking up information on it, or participating in the community, or... reading the... devblogs..." Who did they expect to excite with this announcement, again? There are clearly people who would be thrilled, but the target audience is clearly people who don't play KSP because of the language barrier. Why, then, post the announcement in English, on a mostly-English forum, and expect the English-speaking users to be excited about it? Or, let's flip it around: They promise a big and exciting announcement, that turns out to not be relevant to the vast majority of their audience, and are then surprised that there is backlash? Promising something to one audience, with the intention of delivering it to another, generally isn't a strategy recommended by university textbooks on marketing. I mean, if the game had been in Spanish until now, and suddenly posted a Spanish annoucement of finally getting an English translation, I'd be thrilled to hear it, but the chance of me finding that announcement, never mind caring about the announcement of the imminent announcement, would be slim to none given that I don't speak a single word of Spanish myself. The hype-building, all in Spanish, would go completely over my head. I doubt there are many people who follow forums in languages they can't understand, in the hope that the next unintelligible announcement will somehow be relevant to their ability to play the game. Yes, I know - localization is a good thing. But it's not something that the existing audience will be thrilled about, since it isn't relevant to them. It's seen as a neat feature - for somebody else. Squad should know that. Trying to build hype ahead of the announcement, while knowing that most of the audience would find nothing of interest in it... how could that possibly go wrong? Seriously, could it possibly create anything but disappointment? Did they really think thousands of "foreign-language" users would come rushing out of the woodwork overnight, to create a positive balance against all the negative responses from disappointed users in their established communities? The best analogy I can think of (at 12:25 in the morning) would be if a company making scuba diving equipment suddenly announced that they were going to expand their presence into the ski market - at a scuba diving conference. After hyping it up as scuba news beforehand. The audience they are speaking to, and the audience they are delivering to, are so vastly different that any fanfare they make ahead of the announcement would be purely detrimental. This is an announcement they should not have hyped up in advance.
  8. Well... at least we have the Super Secret Stuff to look forward to. I think it was confirmed that this was separate from the next update, and it was mentioned that it was something for modders to "hook into".
  9. Might as well write an entry based on an experience I had in-game myself. I hope the 300 word limit excludes the article title (this is 305 words counting the title, 295 without it) FIRST DUNA MISSION STUCK IN ORBIT, UNABLE TO GET HOME It is now a year since the crew of the interplanetary spacecraft Duna Express departed Kerbin orbit in the direction of Duna. Yesterday, Public Relations representative at the Kerbal Space Center, Walt Kerman, announced to the press that the landing craft Dunamite I had landed successfully on Duna, and that astronaut Jebediah Kerman had made Kerbalkind's first footprints on the Dunian sand. At a press conference this morning, Kerman could announce that Dunamite I had safely rendezvouzed with the Duna Express mothership, but made no mention of the projected return trip. When pressed on the issue, Kerman admitted that Duna Express had run out of fuel while making orbit around Duna, and therefore could not return to Kerbin on its own. "Listen," Kerman said after the commotion had died down, "This is the first time we've used the LV-N 'Nerv' Atomic Rocket Motors. On the box they came in, it said they were perfect for interplanetary travel, but apparently they didn't perform quite like expected. We're now trying to contact the manufacturer." Lead scientist at the KSC, Werner von Kerman, elaborates on the issue. "Apparently, we had forgotten to drain the ship's fuel tanks of unneeded oxidizer before departure." Von Kerman did not comment on why the fuel tanks were filled with oxidizer in the first place. The Kerbal Space Center is already planning a rescue mission to bring the stranded astronauts home. Plans involve building a second Duna Express ship without the attached landing craft, which will rendezvous with the astronauts in Duna Orbit and take them home. Von Kerman assures the public that they will remember to drain the oxidizer this time. The stranded astronauts were not available for interviews, but sent a short statement where they consider their calamity ”an unexpected vacation”.
  10. To a certain degree, they can. But that's not the problem. Satellites cannot loiter. Planes like the SR-71 are fine for taking a snapshot of an area, and possibly see what the enemy is up to at that one, exact moment in time, but if you want any more than a still image, you have to use something that can stick around for a while. A satellite can give you a few minutes of continuous coverage from an area, but a drone like the RQ-170 can linger for days, under the right circumstances.
  11. More (unlockable) KSCs all over the system. As @Physics Student said, moving a vehicle to do stuff on Kerbin's poles is tedious enough. Now imagine you want to build and test a Laythe or Eve jetski.
  12. Wouldn't you be able to see a kinetic kill vehicle coming literally years in advance, relativistic or not? Stealth in space is pretty impossible, after all. In a wartime scenario with that sort of technology, any large object being accelerated in the other system would be picked up by enemy sensors before it even reached orbital velocities. Ample time to set up several layers of defense and intercept. Given a large enough laser (or even a lens) stationed in the right spot, one could nudge the kill vehicle a few millonths of a degree off-course, causing it to miss by several AU. Or of course, there's an ultimate counter to kinetic weaponry: Be somewhere else when it hits. Again, stealth in space is impossible and you get ample warning time. Moving planets out of the way may not be feasible, but space stations could be moved on relatively short notice. It's not like the enemy could issue commands to correct the course, given that they would observe any movements four years after they happen. Anyway, I have a feeling that this whole discussion is akin to medieval knights discussing details of future jousting, with horses that go a hundred miles per hour and saddles that can keep any knight mounted no matter what. By the time the techniques discussed are even feasible, the larger picture is so irrelevant it's laughable.
  13. The best rhetoricians and psychologists from either civilization gather and create a dazzling multi-media-package which is beamed to the other system and spammed on all channels. The winner is the side that manages to convince the other not to go to war, and who find the best compromise to defuse the entire situation at the same time.
  14. Was it the second-worst abort ever, then? OK, T-0 is hard to beat, but have there been any after the T-15 mark in recent memory?
  15. 13 seconds to go... That was a really close one.