danRosas

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About danRosas

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  1. Thank you everyone for the comments and your best wishes
  2. It’s been more than 4 years since I embarked on the adventure of animating Kerbals. I got to work with amazingly talented people, and can’t measure the tons of experience I was able to gain from them. I’m really grateful to have been part of Squad, and most important of the trust they weighted on me while having creative control over the animated characters. I feel the love of the community for the Kerbals and it really makes me happy to see all the fan work in the forums: drawings, illustrations, animations, all of it. It’s time for me to take a step forward and take care of one personal project, which involves being a student once more in pursuit of a postgraduate degree, and I need to be 100% focused on that path to make it happen. I always tell the guys here at the office I don’t like watching the old animations I’ve done, but you don’t realize how much you’ve learned until you look back. The very first animation I did with the Kerbals looked something like this: And the latest one looked something like... I hope you were all entertained by the Kerbals I was handled to animate and their misfortunes adventures, as much I was making them suffer happy. I’m pretty sure Kerbals will be around for a long period of time, they are really amazing characters to work with from an artistic point of view. For me, it was an amazing experience being able to shape the foundations of the Kerbals as animated characters. All the best, and thank you for being such an amazing community Dan @danrpaulsen
  3. Hey can you maby make a mk2 nosecone for the newer mk 2 inline cockpit?

    :wink:

    1. TopHeavy11

      TopHeavy11

      You need the Mk2 Expansion mod. Making that stock, however, isn't a bad idea. :)

  4. We are happy to announce that Valentina Kerman is now available at our Shapeways Store! As part of the announcement I’m going to explain to you how I prepare a Kerbal for 3D printing. First of all, I need to find the file with Valentina and the rig used in the game animations. Next step is to pose Val to match the rest of the crew available at Shapeways. Next up, the model needs to be adjusted for 3D printing. You can find the requirements and technical specifications at the Shapeways Materials page. So the easiest thing to do at this point is to separate the model into different parts (here I’m talking about internal parts, at the end one single mesh will be exported) and start closing holes. One of the requirements for 3D printing at Shapeways is that all meshes should be watertight. That means there shouldn’t be any “open facesâ€Â. So an optimized model for the game should not work for printing. Some parts of the model, like the body of our Kerbal, work with an empty space on the interior. It should be a walled structure, with an escape hole for the excess of material. That makes the model less expensive, because it will use less 3d printed material. Next step is to extrude the faces of the model of the sections that need support walls. For example, the head and the body. Those two have empty interiors. To extrude the faces I need to be working with mm inside of Maya for the sake of convenience. I only need to push the faces 2 units and most of the times this works just fine. Some parts, like the neck, need to be relaxed, so that faces won’t intersect with each other. Now that we have a watertight model, with support walls to have an empty interior, I need to combine all the shapes into one single mesh, and export the model. Valentina is ready to be uploaded to our Shapeways account, and see if the automated tests send any problems. As you can see, the tweaking process of a model is not extremely complicated, but it needs patience, to be careful about the small details and to always have an eye at the Maya units. Once everything is OK, we send the print to Shapeways! Our friends at Shapeways have sent us some pictures of the printing process of Valentina at the lab. You can find over here a detailed video of the process:
  5. When I started working on Kerbal Space Program, I was handed the task to bring Kerbals to life. The biggest challenge has been converting a bunch of polygons and textures into believable characters that can exist in their own Universe and laws. Kerbals needed to be more than expendable beings inside a sandbox space simulator. After a couple of years in the process, the task of bringing Kerbal girls into the game happened. The design production of the Kerbal girls has been a process of several months of work, of gathering feedback, brainstorming ideas and talk to the guys inside the team and special members of our community. Throughout the road I found some obstacles and design problems that needed to be overcome, which will get explained on this post, to the extent of creating Valentina Kerman: the most badass Kerbonaut inside Kerbal Space Program. How to design the perfect Kerbal female? It all began with an idea at the office. How do we make it happen? What are the social implications of having female Kerbals in the game? How are the Kerbals going to feel, experience and display it? How will they be portrayed? How to translate all the challenges, questions and concepts into one single character? Kerbals are well known to our community, they have their own names, their own backstories, even after the names run through a name generator. Our community has given them stories, backgrounds, adventures, and recorded hours and hours of gameplay with Kerbals visiting all the planets of the known Kerbal Universe. What’s the best way to add a new idea into that already expanding world? One small step before the launch After talking with the Lead Developer Felipe Falanghe, the producer Miguel Piña and the executive producers Ezequiel Ayarza and Adrian Goya, I thumbnailed some ideas of what the Kerbals should look like. The early drafts and concepts look significantly different than the actual model, but from the beginning we had some solid ideas to what paths we were taking. Female kerbals have slightly different proportions than men, human anatomy was taken as a starting point and modified to meet the needs of our universe. Kerbals have very specific proportions, they have noticeable anatomical limitations and need creative ways to solve their day-to-day problems. What makes a Kerbal female? From the beginning we knew that the whole concept of the “Female Kerbal†had to be in the details. Slightly longer arms, but smaller trunks. Heads rounded, against the square heads of the male counterparts. Bigger eyes but smaller mouths. But the first problem happened: what to do with the hair? Kerbal Astronauts have a generic military haircut, but they could have different hairstyles, and colors in other sections of the game. We have played most with that idea on the extended universe of Kerbal Space Program. The YouTube animations have different hairstyles and colors, Kerbalizer has a broad range of styles and wigs. But the core experience is the game. What kind of generic hair should female Kerbal Astronauts have? Some research If you do a quick search with the keywords: female astronauts and look at the list Wikipedia has to offer, you will find that every single one of them as a different hairstyle (as we all humans do). So the first source for references was extremely broad. Next thing to try was different hairstyles and colors. They looked good. But what do we do about the other Kerbals that are already in the game? Should we give them haircuts too? Then the decision came: we need to save resources, give the Kerbals a personal trait, but keep them as generic as always. Our new Kerbals started to have distinctive look and feel, and they could happen inside our Universe. At this point in development, I knew what the body of the female Kerbals was going to be like. The hair was its own problem. Kerbal girls started to look more like young boys than female Kerbals One of the first 3d models that I made looked more like a young Kerbal boy, than a female version of the Kerbals. The smaller size, the rounded face, could match the description of a young version of the male Kerbals. Even after doing some research, there was a missing link to make it work. I tried the idea of using a buzzcut for the girls, just like the guys, but that just pushed the young boy concept even further. It was to that point that talking with the lead developer and producers that they should all have ponytails, and somehow show it inside the helmet, so that they look generic and Kerbal enough. This was going to be the female Kerbal that we were going to appreciate in the game. Until one last iteration. Eyelashes There was one extra detail that I added to the design that helped further the design and concept. Eyelashes. They shouldn’t be extremely toon, but be consistent with the design. A small line surrounding the upper part of the eyes did the trick. We knew we had the base of the female Kerbals inside the game, and that we all liked the design and final result. The most badass Kerbonaut in the game Valentina Kerman was presented to the community as one of the main characters of the game. She has the special orange suit all veterans inside the game have. And the most important characteristic, she is an intertextuality for Valentina Tereshkova, the first woman to fly in space. After overcoming all the challenges that the design exposed, Val felt like an member of the Kerbal Universe already. She had become, as stated at the beginning of the post, more than polygons and textures. Our community quickly adopted her, she starred in fanart of the game as well as the most important missions of YouTubers. Valentina Kerman is, and will always be, the most badass Kerbonaut inside Kerbal Space Program.
  6. Interesting question. It's a double-edged sword. Redoing a system that took a good amount of effort to make would take dev time that could be invested in other tasks that are not yet fully operational (such as all the animation systems inside the game). At the time of implementation, legacy was the only option available, good thing is that it works The only downside is that it's not that artist friendly. But nothing that can't be solved by the team. Had to poke a couple of times Samsonart, because I kept breaking my copy of the game, but right now it appears consistent
  7. nicely done! it's always cool to see animations made by the community. Keep up working!!
  8. After reading the thread and doing some googling... probably some of you understood "rigging a rope" under very different circumstances I was talking about this http://youtu.be/fgsuCQk6ito if you have any suggestions, they are more than welcome. I'm currently doing some research of ncloth dynamics and such
  9. Very nice work you have here! Cheers! D.
  10. From the KSP Team we want to wish you Happy Valentine's! Thanks for being our friends all this development time.
  11. There's a new Kerbal adventure on YouTube! You can find it here: http://youtu.be/2jEzk7vrrbA And there's also a special wallpaper for your desktop in case you want a more kerbalish Christmas decoration. 1920 x 1080 http://i.imgur.com/MGLQR.jpg 1280 x 720 http://i.imgur.com/wUTnT.png 1024 x 768 http://i.imgur.com/H2KMn.png Happy Holidays everyone!
  12. Hey! You're not that far away from our concept drawings!
  13. It's so awesome!!
  14. Thanks for the comment!! It was a collaborative process. Adrian came to us and said "We need a new video for our Youtube channel with the Bobak guy" and then we gathered around some ideas. There was actually a script I drafted, but it was too much for what we needed. So we ended up with a single shot at the two kerbals. The rest was the production phase, with the creation of the new set, props and animations. Hope that answers your question D.
  15. Hello everyone! Probably by now you've already noticed the new KSP video on our YouTube channel. And just in case you haven't seen it here's the link I hope you really enjoy it as it was a fun clip to animate! D.