foamyesque

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About foamyesque

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  1. Unfortunately, my full screenshots of the ascent profile are lost. Peculiarly, the Mammoth engine powering it is generating much less thrust than it used to, which means I can't even refly the mission to demo for you. Gotta rebuild the entire vehicle. That's gonna be a pain.
  2. Heatshields are for the weak
  3. Ignore the people saying it can't be done. It's possible, though tricky, and it feels incredibly cool when you do. A checklist of things you need to remember: 1. Use parts with the highest possible thermal tolerances, all the way across the board, but especially if they're either on the underside or near a leading edge. Mk3 stuff is ideal for this purpose. 2. Enter unloaded. You're planning to use ISRU so you should be close to that anyway. This will save you having ridiculously overbuilt wings on takeoff. 3. Don't enter directly from a flyby. You will explode if you try. Instead, insert yourself into an atmosphere-skimming Eve orbit -- 100x100 puts you just barely above it. I use a burn to do so because it saves piles of playtime, and given your flight plan you should be able to do so easily as well. 4. Only drop your periapsis just a bit; 80km is more than enough. 5. You must be able to maintain a high angle of attack (45 degrees+). This means that your craft needs to be controllable even when all your aerodynamic surfaces are stalled out. Heavy duty RCS is very useful here (and can in fact be muscular enough to act as landing engines on e.g. Minmus). 6. You need to be able to bring it back to conventional flight once you're down below about 1.5km/s. Again, heavy duty RCS is helpful. Between this & #5 you also need very careful attention to your aerodynamic design; try and make it just barely stable for maximum agility. 7. Be prepared for lots of explosions in the testing stage. Oh, and a horizontal Eve launch to orbit is plenty possible too. The nice thing about a spaceplane takeoff on Eve is that you can ignore the TWR > 1 requirement of a vertical launch and instead pack a larger amount of fuel until you jettison your wings. I generally build so that I get rid of them once my Eve TWR has hit around 1.5, pitching to vertical as I do, somewhere around 8km for a sea level launch. From that altitude and with the speed already accumulated you could proceed to orbit on a single stage, potentially, but I've found a two-stage approach works much better.
  4. The Mun originally existed as a part created by @NovaSilisko as a 'try to put something impossible into space' challenge. I put it into space :v The first wings in the game were built by C7 and eventually incorporated into the base game when they joined the team. Prior to the existence of wheels you had to use skids, but on the plus side, the ocean was a runway of infinite length and flatness (though also as hard as concrete). A lot of the 2.5m parts take inspiration from the old Sunday Punch part pack, if I recall correctly. The ability to swap between symmetry modes in either the VAB or the spaceplane building was originally in Editor Extensions.
  5. Wings, man, wings. Landing gear is stupidly sturdy, a horizontal landing keeps your CoG nice and low even if you're long and skinny so's you don't tip, all your bits and Bobs are within a single ladder's reach of the surface so's you can efficiently disembark/ISRU/go roving, and your launch TWR doesn't need to be ungodly huge. Also, it looks pretty danged cool.
  6. My own experience is that the best way to get truly massive Eve vehicles down in one piece is to put wings on them, but it takes extensive testing to get the aero- and thermo- dynamics of the entry correct.
  7. I brought back four, in a Mk3 cockpit. First stage was winged drop tanks, to haul me up to proper rocketry altitude without needing TWR > 1, feeding a single mammoth; second stage, the mammoth on a conventional stack of tanks with some wings on for aero stability; third stage, a poodle-powered microshuttle, which met up with a tank left in Eve orbit and acted as the Kerbin lander. Needed a couple more mammoths to get off Kerbin's surface in the first place, but those were winged and recoverable boosters that I landed back at KSC.
  8. The Mammoth is the way to go. With clever design you can do a sea-level return and only need to discard one engine.
  9. Stupid is the key word there Lemme see if I can find my old screenshot... ah, here we go:
  10. I dunno. It made landing some kind of planes pretty difficult -- they just wouldn't stop. When they started gaining both speed and altitude with a deployed parachute and no thrust, I knew I needed to report it :v
  11. Infini-Glide. :v
  12. That works okay when you're launching to LKO, but it can cause you issues if you're e.g. biome hopping or trying to do a return mission with high deltaV requirements, such as from Eve. Orbital horsing around can immensely reduce your mass budget over trying to bring all your bits to and fro.
  13. Your throttle is at zero. Have you tried throttling up?
  14. That's mostly true, but incomplete: There's also mass distribution and air resistance distribution to consider. A glider-style wing will allow you to pitch much more easily than a delta will, all else equal, for example.
  15. Command pods generate lift; you can, by flying not quite pure retrograde, keep yourself in the upper atmosphere longer, which will lower your peak temperatures.