Whackjob

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About Whackjob

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  1. I notice I failed to actually answer the question. I first got it when I watched the Scott Manley videos. I kid you not, that's what got my career really going. Once I learned how to orbit and rendezvous, that was that!
  2. Welcome aboard! You are good enough with English. You have no reason to worry!
  3. If I'm making a tower lander, it's some version of Arkingthaad. If it's a round flat plate with fifty to a hundred engines or higher, it's an AEIA (An Exercise in Absurdity) MkWhatever. If it's a big rover, it's a Whackamo. If it's something else, it's a Brick.
  4. Okay, this thread is Whackjob bait like no other. I'll contribute. ... when the smartest place to put the crew can is on the *bottom* of the rocket. ... when the rover you want to launch requires unique embarking procedures. ... when you build tall enough to smell the grass burn while the air at your head is as thin as your hair.
  5. Welcome aboard! There's two schools of thought in KSP engineering. The smart folks choose, "What's effective and practical?" I am not a smart man.
  6. You back, man?

  7. Engineering exercise. It never left Kerbin, but with it, I learned how to move about large masses on wheels in a stable manner.
  8. Well, I *did* have a rover like that once. [
  9. Yes! That's one of my favorite design innovations. Putting the crew container on the cheeks end of the rocket. Why climb all the way from the top? Just gotta put the actual engines safely out to the side.
  10. The outside columns are actually combination lander legs and thruster cores. In landers past, while I'd have reinforcement thick like I usually like, there would still be just one main reinforced "spar" going out to the leg. I've gone multiple in that regard. I'm exploiting engineering's greatest secret: Triangles.
  11. I'm dabbling with lander legs that can handle several times the weight I normally work with.
  12. God, I can't remember. Did I test things after this update? I honestly don't remember. The past months have been such a blur! I still owe you guys a new thing that's very big with lots of pictures of it flying and/or kerploding. Maybe this update will make bigger stuff possible.
  13. It uses a truss cage. Long story short, when I started building real big, I learned the best way to keep huge things together was not to go from, say, tank-strut-tank, but rather tank-truss-strut-truss-tank. It can flex enough to where the weight doesn't shear everything, and enough of them can give you the semblance of a rigid ship. With it, you can launch everything. If you mean the first one, the huge stack, there's a whole *ton* of reaction control wheels clipped into the tanks. Wanted that one to look clean, for some reason.
  14. I figured I'd weigh in ever so briefly. I don't this thing will work. I think the readings they've gotten are either instrumental or human error, and that it will be tracked down eventually. I don't think we've stumbled upon a magical machine that violates known physics. Which is a bummer. I'd infinitely prefer something small and easy like this to open the universe to us. I wish it were real.
  15. Yep. Melted the proc right out of my laptop doing stuff like and