ProtoJeb21

The Astro-Imaging Thread

Astro-Imaging Questions   46 members have voted

  1. 1. What's Your Favorite Solar System Body to Image?


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598 posts in this topic

2 minutes ago, _Augustus_ said:

YOU GOT THE MOONS!

Explain.

Lots of stacking, long(-ish?) exposures, and a 10 inch scope.

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7 minutes ago, Adstriduum said:

BEHOLD URANUS:

Sorry. Juvenile, I know, but this made me snicker. 

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Just now, Adstriduum said:

Lots of stacking, long(-ish?) exposures, and a 10 inch scope.

So not your scope?

What camera?

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Just now, _Augustus_ said:

So not your scope?

What camera?

I borrowed both so I can upgrade my equipment to get a feel for it. The scope they built, and the camera I didn't look.

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On 6/29/2017 at 1:06 PM, _Augustus_ said:

EWmAIeE.gif

 

On 6/29/2017 at 6:49 PM, Adstriduum said:

All of this deep sky stuff and not a lot of planets...

BEHOLD URANUS:

LOfZLcz.png

This wasn't processed very nicely :/

From top to bottom: Oberon, Titania,, Miranda, Uranus, Ariel, Umbriel.

Super happy how this turned out! :) Next stop: Neptune!

Great job guys! I will so try stuff like this later in summer.

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Nice to see how fast Jupiter rotates ...

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Posted (edited)

Surprise! NGC 7331 Group (The Deer Lick) and HGC 92 (Stephan's Quintet). Full res image and tech card: https://www.astrobin.com/301932/J/?nc=user

7645ec325bfc509d2ebb48b21e85cac5.1824x0_

 

Edited by Epox75
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Posted (edited)

This is interesting. I was so excited about what I've noticed that I didn't even finish to process the image and I sent an Email to the Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams. The Image speaks for itself: 

J2cRh59.jpg

 

Edited by Epox75
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15 minutes ago, Epox75 said:

This is interesting. I was so excited about what I've noticed that I didn't even finish to process the image and I sent an Email to the Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams. The Image speaks for itself: 

J2cRh59.jpg

 

Wow! :0.0:

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@Epox75 congratulations! Got a response yet? So is it a supernova, a nova, or something else. You would probably be able to make a separate thread related to this too.

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Posted (edited)

Epox should change his  class (like for me exoplaneteer) to nova Hunter or something.

Edited by Cabbink
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Posted (edited)

Anyway: Nova or not, here's the final version of NGC 7331 and Stephan's Quintet until I gather more data. I had some trouble with background brightness because of one of my monitor was badly calibrated but now it should be ok. Technical card: http://www.astrobin.com/301932/M/?nc=user

e7f1164f3f9cc972f03aaf3dc81863d1.1824x0_

 

 

Edited by Epox75
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Any reply?

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Posted (edited)

Instead of asking you could have written one ;-)

I admire Epox' work and it amazes me that he caught a remarkable event of a star. I can't judge whether it's a (periodic) fluctuation or something more impressive. It seems to be a star and inside our galaxy so it is probably no nova or even supernova, but this is just a guess.

I personally do not have the time for nightly telescopic activity right now and for the coming weeks so i sadly cannot contribute more than sporadic theorizing.

@Epox75: i really like it. I find the picture very well done, colours, sharpness, contrast and all. I would be very content if i managed something with that quality :-)

 

Edited by Green Baron
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Posted (edited)

@Green Baron Thank you, you are very kind. Yes I totally agree with you, it could be a normal fluctuation but who knows, the color difference is remarkable. I would consider a chromatic aberration a very unlikely possibility. Check this picture of the 5th of july (not mine): https://www.astrobin.com/full/302206/B/, I would be amazed if someone didn't notice it before.

Anyway I felt like it was something to report. I believe the people I sent the information are very busy people and they need maybe more than a single report to move their telescopes. I haven't received any answer yet, I am not waiting for it but I am not letting this thing go either. Today I have sent them a plain-text email because I fear my previous emails might have been spam/filtered ( http://www.cbat.eps.harvard.edu/HowToReportDiscovery.html ). I reported what I have observed from my pictures and from the comparison with past and present pictures, the name of the star (this alone gives everything they need, It's not easy to find the name of any star you see) and I said that I will provide all the information I know as soon as I will receive a feedback from them. I really don't think I can do more than that :)

Having acknowledgement would be great but let's say I am quite happy to have witnessed a celestial event, or even better a celestial event which would be invisible under normal circumstances (like looking at the sky with naked eyes). 

Edit: it would be great to have a spectroscopy of the star and someone actually able to read it :)

Edited by Epox75
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I did it again, the family is getting bigger. I found an offer for the TS 8'' Ritchey Chretien and since it was in my wishlist, I didn't let it go. Now I'll have my personal Hubble ( .... the baffles... oh the baffles! :confused: https://youtu.be/bLLL1Jmf12U )

Also the Baader CCD set of NB filters is incoming. 

 

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Arrived today, I need to wait for another package before being "Go for 1st Light":

FoBEht1.jpg

SDfpfc8.jpg

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I like the cat :-)

I've been out watching visually yesterday with the neighbours and my 8" TS Newton.

Nice design, the RC, TS is getting really good at this. Only the fat spider might produce hefty spikes. We should ask for a discount next time since we make so much advertisement for them :-)

cs !

 

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Posted (edited)

3 hours ago, Green Baron said:

I like the cat :-)

I've been out watching visually yesterday with the neighbours and my 8" TS Newton.

Nice design, the RC, TS is getting really good at this. Only the fat spider might produce hefty spikes. We should ask for a discount next time since we make so much advertisement for them :-)

cs !

 

Thanks! :wink:

What did you see? Jupiter, Saturn and Andromeda maybe? I actually miss some planetary visual especially Saturn, I was used to dedicate some minutes watching it through the eyepiece before start to get pictures. 

Yes the design looks very nice indeed. Raw and sturdy. The TS version has also the focuser separate from the primary mirror, so no shifting during focusing which was a well known problem and widely reported (I think as well as the AT has this correction but I'm not sure if it is limited to the carbon version). I ordered a 0.67x astrophysics reducer which is know to be absolutely the best for the whole GSO RC series, so with the Newton at 600mm f/4, this one at 1088 f/5.4 or 1624 f/8 and the C11 at 1764mm f/6,3 or 2800 f/10 (maybe just for very small objects)  I think I have a lot of possibilities. I am also planning to stack the 0.67 reducer over the coma corrector of my newton. It's a reducer for flat field telescopes (APO too) so my guess is if I use it correctly I don't see why It shouldn't work... moreover at  402mm at  f2.7 who cares of some light loss :). I maybe expect some illumination issue but we will see. 

And about the price, 839 Eur, there are very nice offers now on the RC series. The 6'' is at 399 Eur. 

Edited by Epox75
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Was out watching again. But too much stirring in the atmosphere, planets bounced around, Saturn's rings weren't even recognizable, Andromeda galaxy rose as a mixed up blob. A strong warm wind blew over the ridge but it was cool and clear below, i think that a few hundred meters above my position conditions would have been much better.

On 20.7.2017 at 9:22 PM, Epox75 said:

 

What did you see? Jupiter, Saturn and Andromeda maybe? I actually miss some planetary visual especially Saturn, I was used to dedicate some minutes watching it through the eyepiece before start to get pictures. 

Oh sorry, i missed that. Yes, Jupiter and Saturn, Andromeda galaxy, galactic center is high in the sky here. Seeing conditions limited the experience. No photo-weather right now ...

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Not really an astro-image but I thought I'd share anyway. I took the photo below this evening. It is the ISS passing almost directly overhead. I have to work on more smoothly hand-holding the camera and getting the right exposure settings, but I am happy with this result from my first try:

mHIwgUy.jpg

Edited by PakledHostage
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