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TRAPPIST-1 now has seven planets. (Possible life?)

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Guys, apparently this is what TRAPPIST-1 looks like, this is possibly the image from the Transiting Planets and Planetesimals Small Telescope at the La Silla Observatory, or through the Spitzer space telescope.

giphy.gif

 

It's being discussed on Reddit, including how they are able to tease out the data on the planets, you might want to take a look.

More info including graphs and the animation above are here.

And raw data here.

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Planet h has an equil temp of 169k, putting it on the snow line, and an orbital period of 18.764 days.

Additionally, TRAPPIST-1 has a rotational period of 3.3 days, and has a number of flares consistent with an active, middle aged, late M dwarf.

More info here: https://arxiv.org/pdf/1703.04166.pdf

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Posted (edited)

More data via the Nature page or through the team of the University of Liége. The first name in the authors list of the original paper is the one to address.

Guys, you overestimate our momentary possibilities by magnitudes. Also much has been put as facts which are just fantasies. Nobody knows what these planets look like, no spectral traces of atmospheres were found (though featureless atmospheres can not be ruled out completely).

The orbital parameters of the planets where deduced by changes in the apparent magnitude of the star. I'd laugh out loud if one day we find out that we were hunting sun spots or a yet unknown form of solar activity.

This does not mean that i think it is bogus, i think it is serious data that yet needs some interpretation (that's why all the speculation takes place ;-)) but i also think it'll take yet a few years and maybe new telescopes to get a clearer view of that system

Btw., the thrilling question for planetary science is not whether there is life but how could such a system possibly form.

:-)

Edited by Green Baron

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Posted (edited)

On 14.3.2017 at 5:47 PM, Spaceception said:

Planet h has an equil temp of 169k, putting it on the snow line, and an orbital period of 18.764 days.

Additionally, TRAPPIST-1 has a rotational period of 3.3 days, and has a number of flares consistent with an active, middle aged, late M dwarf.

More info here: https://arxiv.org/pdf/1703.04166.pdf

I just wanted to link this but you already did so :-)

May i add: preliminary evaluation of the K2 data, not yet published.

I do not agree with the "169K is on the snow line" part. At least not H20 snow. 100K are missing if we ignore highly speculative atmospheres or other heating mechanisms that we don't know about.

Be it as it may: the star is between 3 and 8 billion years old. There is no reason to assume that the planets have not formed in place. But the system might get instable in the future (a billion of years), see original paper.

The E-ELT might be able to actually give images of the planets :-)

 

Edited by Green Baron
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On ‎3‎/‎3‎/‎2017 at 0:54 AM, 0111narwhalz said:

Problem is, there're no gas giants. Probably. I'd expect they would find a large body like a gas giant before a pile of little pebbles, but this is outside my range of (mediocre) expertise.

Red dwarf stars have very low likelihood for gas giants. This star has an unusally high metallicity, so rocky planets could be fairly likely.

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