Spaceception

How will kids learn the names of over 100 planets?

40 posts in this topic

On 03.03.2017 at 10:27 PM, Spaceception said:

Learning the names of 111 (112 if Planet 9 exists) planets, how would kids learn the names of them?

Just learning the Ancient Greek mythology they will learn even yet unknown ones. Plus 10-20 of non-Greek names.

On 03.03.2017 at 11:21 PM, LordFerret said:

There are over 100 countries in this world (196 at last count, or 195 if you exclude Taiwan). Can you name all of them?

Of course, except 5..10 of them like "(...) and (...) Islands".

P.S.
They can define Pluto as "honorary planet".

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1 hour ago, ProtoJeb21 said:

I am a Pluto supporter.

We're done here, I can't speak with your kind!

I see what you mean, but there would still be too many bodies that'd fit in that definition than I'd be comfortable with. Aren't there a few bodies in the kuiper belt even bigger than Pluto?

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Posted (edited)

Design a collectable card game in which each planet gets its own card. Problem solved.

Seriously - kids can memorise vast quantities of complete gibberish if it isn't something they're told they have to do. For example, I swear my 8 year old nephew knows the name, special attacks and probably parentage, notable battles and personal life story of every Pokémon out there.

Edited by KSK
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Kids can learn the name of... How many is it nowadays? 500 Pokémons... 200 League of Legends Characters, hundreds of Minecraft recipes...
112 planets is nothing for them. :P

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The ancients may have had the same idea! "Jupiter" is the lightning-slinging star of innumerable mythological sexual adventures. Of course it probably helps when you can see them in the sky.

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10 hours ago, KSK said:

Design a collectable card game in which each planet gets its own card. Problem solved.

And bottle caps. Gather 100 and gain a trip. (...)-Cola - the way to infinity!

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On ‎3‎/‎3‎/‎2017 at 2:27 PM, LetsGoToMars! said:

It will doubtlessly be that +2 bonus points question on the 2024 science final. Of course, there is no guarantee that will happen, as making the definition of "planet" so broad would make the term meaningless. There is an immense difference between these planetoids, and "real" planets. 

 

 

Under the same logic the definition of asteroid is too broad, considering it has everything from bodies in hydrostatic equilibrium hundreds of kilometers across to bodies the size of a fist... Is "asteroid" meaningless? Why should "planet" be any different? Heck, "moon" is just as meaningless as "asteroid", why should "planet" be special?

Of course, that's not an argument for changing the definition, but saying that it would be too broad as to be meaningless isn't a good argument against it, as a planet could be defined as a body in hydrostatic equilibrium (perhaps disregarding its status as orbiting another planet, as double planets are a possibility), which would have more meaning than "asteroid" and "moon," as it would distinguish a planet from other objects to a larger degree than both of those terms. So, we can either make Ceres not an asteroid, and change the definition of "asteroid" and "moon" to be more meaningful while adding special categories for moons and asteroids in hydrostatic equilibrium, or we just leave the mess where it is.

"Body in hydrostatic equilibrium but is not fusing elements at its core" is a mouthful, so we could just shorten it to planet... or come up with something new entirely that includes planets and dwarf planets.

 

On to the topic at hand:

Considering there are kids who memorize dozens, or even more, digits of Pi, I don't think it's all that hard to just memorize them, if the kid wanted to. But it probably wouldn't be that big of a deal in science class at all. We don't memorize the names of all of the moons of Jupiter or Saturn, so...?

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12 hours ago, Bill Phil said:

Considering there are kids who memorize dozens, or even more, digits of Pi

Those are outliners.

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(Chinese children are laughing, reading this thread. 100 names... Try to learn thousands of hieroglyphs.)

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Posted (edited)

around 50 000 ideo-picto-phonogram as far as i know ... japanese are little player only 2000 kenji and 75x 2 syllabic alphabet (jk watashi wa baka desu), then come the vocal disambiguation xDr

Edited by WinkAllKerb''

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The solar system comprises the Sun, Jupiter, and miscellaneous debris.

There. Easy to remember.

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Quote
  • Max Persistent Debris
    • Sets the max number of debris-class objects that can exist at the same time. Higher numbers mean more work for the CPU. Ranges from 0 to unlimited. Min:0, Max:Unlimited.
    • Default: 250

 

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On ‎3‎/‎6‎/‎2017 at 0:12 PM, munlander1 said:

Those are outliners.

Considering that many students are required to memorize quite a few different things of various lengths, it's very possible for the majority to memorize a large number of... well, almost anything. They memorize thousands of words due to simply knowing how to speak/write/read English.

The reason those kids are outliers is because students are only required to learn a few digits of Pi by the curriculum. But many students have to memorize many other things, otherwise they simply wouldn't pass their finals. Everything from vocab words to grammar rules to formulas to what happened in 1066 and much more. Heck, history finals have a boat load of names, people, places, battles, and dates. Yet many kids are able to pass those tests.

They're outliers in the sense that they have chosen to memorize those digits. Not so much in their capability (unless they memorize hundreds...) to memorize them.

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Posted (edited)

memorizing abstract or concrete ^^ et memo trick & memo teknik and training to this or that

Edited by WinkAllKerb''

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On 04/03/2017 at 11:24 PM, Nuke said:

why are schools still teaching kids to memorize long lists of trivial data? seriously this stuff is only useful when jeopardy comes on.

Is that not true for pretty much anything beyond the Moon?

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