35 posts in this topic

27 minutes ago, tater said:

Every 'tater I have in the pantry sprouts. 

Life finds a way...

 

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For some reason, I've always pictured having a garden in my home in the future. My grandmother, on my mother's side (well, on my dad's side too, but my mom's mom's is way bigger), even into her 90's now, I believe, has an enormous garden and she still keeps animals. By herself. She's a pretty incredible lady.

Anything I should know before starting a garden? Like a gardening 101 thing?

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@Tex, I have no idea what I'm doing, I just plant stuff and I see what grows. Some things I have thrive on a sort of benign neglect (rosemary, for example---mine is already flowering and covered with bees, and it briefly snowed yesterday (it was shorts weather the day before---but that's life in the mountains).

Edited by tater
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27 minutes ago, tater said:

@Tex, I have no idea what I'm doing, I just plant stuff and I see what grows. Some things I have thrive on a sort of benign neglect (rosemary, for example---mine is already flowering and covered with bees, and it briefly snowed yesterday (it was shorts weather the day before---but that's life in the mountains).

I know mountain weather all too well.

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If you want stuff that grows when neglected, try mint. We have a raised box in my backyard that's overrun by the stuff.

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We tried an aquaponics setup once. You know, pump fish poop water through a shallow tray full of rocks and plants. It worked well for things like lettuce and basil.

Then we introduced a bit of mint.

Shortly thereafter, nothing but mint was left. Its roots clogged the rocks and the drain. We tried to pull all the plants out, but they kept growing back from the tiny nodules we couldn't get. Eventually it started suffering from rot, so we ripped all the lava rock out and hosed the tray down.
Never again...

Also, we planted morning glories near our shed. After cultivating them for a few seasons, we stopped bothering with them. It wasn't until several seasons later that we stopped seeing their seedlings. Maybe we just have good soil, or maybe they're just hard to kill.

A word of advice: If you have a grapevine, do not, under any circumstances, plant a rosemary beside it. The rosemary will invade and kill the grapevine.

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My mint has not taken over, and I actually want it to for tea and mojitos, lol. Along with some food I cook with mint. Oregano fills that role here, I have to give away large, shovel sized clumps of plant to people. My thyme spreads, but needs to be cut back in winter or it dies in the middle (like the chamisa bushes I hack down to nothing every year that end up the size of a VW by October).

Herbs are a good place to start I think, as you can eat them, but you only need a small crop to be successful in that regard, and the bees like the flowers when they get to that point (my friend keeps bees, nd he got me to bump up the flowers around the house).

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I had a "garden" back when my grandmother was alive. It was a few cheap pots from store. We grew mint, oregano, and dill. Within two years, the mint took over the oregano side of the pot, and the dill had its own pot, which grew very well,  and  didn't die until last year.

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I get all my seeds from these guys.  Lots of heirloom varieties with long histories of being grown in the US.  Real funky stuff too.

http://www.rareseeds.com/

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I live in a high-rise, so gardens aren't really a thing. Instead, all 'gardening' (for lack of a better term) is performed in flower pots on the household's main balcony. Inefficient? Yes. Amateur? Definitely. Does it work? Absolutely.

A variety of plants are grown on the balcony, most of which are purely decorative flowers. Round here, sweet potato slips are a delicacy, which is one of the (edible) plants grown in our 'garden'. Mint is another, along with various other vegetables.

No pics for now. Hopefully I will be able to obtain some SoonTM.

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