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Matuchkin

Weirdest question I have ever asked...

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Posted (edited)

Given a rocket tall enough, with just enough structural stability and gyroscopes, will it be possible to djent with said rocket?

Edited by Matuchkin

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Does not "djent" refer to a particular tone produced on a guitar? What would that have to do with a rocket? :confused:

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Djent? Watchatalkingaboot.

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Posted (edited)

2 hours ago, LordFerret said:

Does not "djent" refer to a particular tone produced on a guitar? What would that have to do with a rocket? :confused:

I mean, having the rocket wobble enough that it creates said tone.

Image result for ksp wobbly rocket gif

 

Edited by Matuchkin
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Oh, you mean a rocket guitar?

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1 minute ago, Bill Phil said:

Oh, you mean a rocket guitar?

Sure, I guess.

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The answer to your question can be nothing but "Yes!", considering the definition of the word "enough".

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Posted (edited)

Simply put, yes, rockets can have harmonic resonance similar to that of hitting a wine glass and causing it to creating a 'hum'. The Saturn V in fact actually encountered this issue twice during launches.

Complicated answer; the vibrations are from the rocket engines of the rocket that at a high enough intensity could cause the structure to "vibrate". This was a focal point in one of Nikola Tesla's machines (Tesla's Oscillator) that would move a piston back and forth at a set speed against the structure of a building to cause it to shake and that at the right speed (frequency) it could (in theory) cause a building to collapse.

This same issue was noticed in the build of the Saturn V due to it's engine power and tall size. This was known as "pogo oscillation" and was the result of the combustion's frequency and escape through the rocket nozzle and could cause severe structural damage to the vehicle. This was best noted in Apollo 6 (unmanned flight of the Saturn V) where the oscillations were so great they damaged the second stage S-II engines and caused them to shutdown prematurely and also damaged the J-2 (third stage) engine to the point it was unable to fire making the mission a near failure (but a complete success as far as data). The issue returned during the ill fated Apollo 13 mission and is the cause for the early inboard shutdown of the second stage center engine (the oscillations were likely not the cause of the mission's later SM explosion).

To combat this NASA added "throats" and filters through the rocket nozzle to limit the fluctuations in the combustion and minimize the chance of pogo oscillations occurring. It should be noted this was done before Apollo 13's mission but to no effect in that one particular instance.

However as to the sound aspect of your question; the answer is no. This is sadly because the frequency would be below that of the audible spectrum for humans. However this doesn't mean you cannot hear the sounds this causes such as the rumbling of objects attached or within such an object. Just not the oscillation itself. Granted in the case of a rocket; even if it was within the audible spectrum, it'd still be a challenge to hear considering the volume of the Saturn V is 220db, a volume that won't just deafen you, but likely kill you and do very much worse.

Edited by ZooNamedGames
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Good. I'm making a new djent-metal band, this will come in handy. :P

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