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Nuke

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Everything posted by Nuke

  1. if were talking the original trilogy, they were very consistent.
  2. star trek is a good example of setting the rules and sticking to them. there are even subtle starship design rules which have added a lot to the franchise and are responsible for some of the most beautiful spaceships ever made (heres looking at you d'deridex). of course more recent iterations of trek tend to ignore those rules or fail to interpret them correctly. magic mushroom drive being the most egregious sin. i think this was done so they could have faster ships than star wars, however the reason star wars has the fastest ships, is because no one bothered to figure out how long transit times should be. instead of having a rule of thumb (which star trek did) ships went as fast as the plot required. id rather sci-fi acknowledge that space is big and treat it accordingly.
  3. even the mars helicopter found second wind without an "essential to flight" sensor.
  4. i find its often more important that sci-fi be consistent. give the universe a set of rules to follow right away, and then stick to them like glue. they should make sense in the context of the universe in which they exist. if they align closely to irl physics, thats good too. but i dont think its required to make a good story. just remember that your audience tends to be nerds, and they will find every plothole you commit to paper or screen.
  5. i had a dream where i had a pet giant isopod named podrich.
  6. i stopped spelling things correctly when i lost faith in educational institutions.
  7. having ships with very large reactors, something like the iter tokamak, i think would solve this. there is likely a lower band for fusion, especially when using magnetic confinement. you require minimum reactor volumes on the order of meters due to scaling laws for the reactor design. these would both be very massive and would represent a lot of capitol. so it would be impractical to use these drives on missiles (barring long range planet killers, but thats a whole other can of worms). missiles might instead depend on chemical engines or beamed power thermal engines or a combination of both. two stage missiles where the first stage is beamed power, the firing ship gets these things up to intercept velocity with power from its own reactor. once out of range of its ship, it would rely on the chemical engine for the terminal phase. ships might fire swarms of these things to maximize the kill probability (this adds the interesting scenario where the ship is a sitting duck while launching swarms since its using energy required by its engine). you might also use gun-missile hybrid weapons using multistage guns or linear accelerators to get a lot of initial velocity for intercept. then use srb charges for the terminal phase (some spin stabilized asat weapons do this). these ships could use their engines while firing but would be more massive. this would be the option for npp as you have replaced a big fusion reactor with a giant pusher plate. the limit here is not velocity but the delta-v of the terminal phase. ships cannot outrun missiles, but they can out burn them. so battle is like a cheetah vs an impala. missiles can accelerate faster in their terminal phase, but its delta-v limited. a target can be thought of as an expanding radius. a target ship will engage in evasive maneuvers the second it detects incoming ordinance, and this radius will depend on how much space the ship can cover during the intercept phase, we can call this the evasion radius. so you fire your missiles in a pattern that enables it to cover as much of that radius as possible. the delta-v of the terminal phase limits how much space each missile can cover. each missile will have an assured destruction radius from the point where it exits the intercept phase, any target in that radius is effectively dead. combat doctrine would involve firing enough missiles so that their destruction radii (think of it as a sphere) completely fill the target's evasion radius sphere with enough overlap to deny survival. this is not always possible, you might not have enough ordinance or you might be too far and the the ship would have too much time to escape. you could have dialog like: "sir, firing solution is at 60% coverage with the full magazine, do i engage?" "negative, if we miss they could turn and swamp us". that could be interesting if you plan on having a lot of tactical dialogue. multiple ships can also converge their firing solutions for maximum kill probability but requires the light delay to be significantly short enough. use of stealth and concealment can add additional tactical flare. think you are in a 1v1 battle, fire your ordinance. then a ship pops out of a sensor shadow and unloads its missiles, while the target ship launches its missiles to fill the gaps. this makes sense if the things being fought over are immobile like big space colonies or planets/asteroids/moon systems. you could intentionally build in messy locations and hide corvettes among the space debris.
  8. pretty sure you can do something with the aerodynamics to keep that thing flying straight. also its spun up so that should help spin stabilize it.
  9. i think my solution is to dispense with the rest of the ship, put everything in the torus and either get rid of the hub or put your lander there endurance style. keeping things like engines and fuel tanks in spin gravity helps solve ullage issues. you might need to beef up the structural components though. but it seems like it would be a bit better than carrying bearings, motors and crew access tunnels (and all the airlocks and hatches involved). you can also put a big aeroshell on one side and use it for aerocapture maneuvers.
  10. just use windows file sharing. put all machines on the same workgroup and share whatever folders you need access to, be sure you give yourself permissions and log on with that account. you might also consider upgrading the os on the old computer, 7 would be a lot less fiddly than xp. i routinely share with my win7 3d printing rig and ive been able to get at it with windows versions all the way up to 11, ive also been able to talk to xp virtual machines this way. there are probibly tutorials on youtube or whatever that could explain it better than i could.
  11. saw it on friday. i thought it was pretty good. dont think ive had that kind of experience at the theater for a very long time. lately ive been leaving the theater wishing id just spent my money on beer instead. this was not one of those movies. im actually shocked our little non profit 1-screen 1-movie a week theater at the highschool got it so fast. it normally takes us 3 months to get movies.
  12. i grew up with slasher flicks. back then nobody gave a rats left buttock if you let your 5 year olds watch "scary" movies. of course by the time i was 10 i was so desensitized to the horror genre that they were almost comedy at that point.
  13. seems like rent-an-engine was more an evolution of the trend to make secondary income on the sale of an engine to a company wanting to make a similar game. then came the games that seemed to exist only as a tech demo for the engine, with the engine sales being the primary motivation. that happened with every ut, q3a, doom3, crysis, etc. game engines like unity, which as far as i know was not made with any particular kind of game in mind, but built as more of a framework. i guess there is a business incentive to keep the game development out of house where you can focus on the never ending job of engine development and maintenance. its also good for long running f2p or subscription games where you need to have a long term upgrade path to keep the game compatible with ever changing hardware capabilities.
  14. ive done that twice and both times ended up limping for a week.
  15. healthcare is stupid. so stupid i would rather die of something preventable than put myself in their care. whats more, healthcare is evil. it likes to cast patients to the four winds for the myriads of diagnostic tests, book flights on monopolistic airlines that skimp on the legspace, put them and their mandatory escorts in shadey hotels, grant them food coupons that can only be claimed in a hospital cafeteria, rip off cab drivers with their voucher system so much that they refuse to service them, pump funds into some of the most opulent architecture i have ever seen, all so they can do a 20 minute test that comes up inconclusive. granted this wasnt my diagnostic, i was the escort. but it seriously has me questioning whether its a good idea to go to extreme measures to enable humans to live to ages > 50. also our town wants to spend 200 million on a new hospital when they cant even afford to put doctors and equipment into the hospital we got which are capable of doing basic 20 minute tests.
  16. didnt quite happen today. but i finally had to get out of town to take care of mom's diagnostic escort duty. the stupidity of the health care scheduling and the blatant ripping off of everyone involved will de discussed in the negative thread. but while we were in anchorage, i got to meet my new nephew. spent a few hours bouncing him on my knee until he leaked poo all over my pants. somehow i always get stuck with the members of my family who wear diapers.
  17. alaska still told by federal government that they cannot drill on the gargantuan, desolate, reindeer infested wasteland.
  18. so far all the science has been done with small scale centrifuges. having seen a carny do the humpty hump on the wall of a spun up graviton (an excellent piece of showmanship mind you) way back in the 90s. i think the whole large centrifuge concept has legs. its really just a matter of design optimization. i like the idea of the ring ship, like the endurance from interstellar. centrifuge has other benefits besides crew comfort. for example you can solve a lot of tank balancing and ullage concerns. its easier to move fuel around when it has a down. this is probibly not on the timetable for a mars mission though. i do think keeping a couple tethered starships at roughly mars gravity would help give the astronauts their mars legs. you don't want to get to mars and find your crew cant get out of their couches and are unable to do essential mission tasks. not to mention the second ship gives you some redundancy and perhaps some extra cargo capacity, more emergency consumables and the like. the mars mission can be the beta test for future centrifuge concepts and gives the astronauts some science experiments to do during the long trip.
  19. not if you have more than one cat. in that case both will become cluttered.
  20. pessimism and optimism are two sides of the same coin, a currency for the delusional. its a sign that you need to get a cat. my desk always has at least one cat on it.
  21. im not sure large counter torque wheels are even required anymore from building various large centrifuge ships in ksp. counter torque could be provided by rcs. once the centrifuge is spun you only need to counter any friction loss at the bearings (which can be very small with some bearing types) and losses from maneuvers. there is a point where the extra propellant requirements will make the high angular velocity rotor a viable alternative, but thats all a matter of the mission design. it may be just as viable to leave it at the space dock to save the mass. ive built some with rotors (usually an equipment bay with a motor and some ore tanks inside spinning at high rpm), some without and it can work either way.
  22. doing maneuvers on a rotating space craft is pretty straight forward mathematically. im pretty sure nasa already uses it on spin stabilized space probes. rcs thrusters perform differently while in a rotating frame. say you want to do a pitch moment, and you get a yaw instead. its sort of like how burning normal/antinormal rotates your orbital plane along the axis from where you perform the burn, to the center of the thing you are orbiting. and its pretty much the same thing, just replace gravity with structural binding and also are constrained to circular orbits by structure. there is some vector math for this kind of thing but it escapes my memory.
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