MinimumSky5

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About MinimumSky5

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  1. Pivoting back to B1048... I've been wondering why the legs were removed, and I've just had a thought: Is this the booster for the in flight abort test? Given that one of the big changes recently in the first stages was mods to make retraction of the legs easier, and there aren't that many solidly scheduled launches coming up, I can't see why they'd rush to get the legs off, unless the next flight doesn't need them.
  2. Its really quite shocking to compare this to the equivalent plans from NASA, which just seam to amount to 'Let's land someone on the moon, then maybe we'll make use of lunar ice.' That's a very good goal, but without being slotted into a larger overall plan like this, it's kind of pointless.
  3. I know that we rightly mocked the bad camera views in one of they Cygnus livestreams, but i think that Boeing just took that award. Here comes abort engine cutoff -- Nope That pitch up manoeuvre looks cool -- Nope This is a really interesting parachute system --- Nope Well, at least we get to see the service module crash -- Nope Also, i do believe that they had a parachute failure on one of the mains, I thought that there were meant to be three mains?
  4. I'll bet you $53 million that it doesn't launch on Wednesday.
  5. How long would it take for Starship to get to Saturn? AFAIK, it would be multiple years.
  6. Ars did an interview with Musk after the press event, and they expanded on a couple of points: https://arstechnica.com/features/2019/09/after-starship-unveiling-mars-seems-a-little-closer/ The big one for me is that SpaceX has learnt a lot about life support from working on Crew Dragon, and Elon is at least dimly aware that a full regenerative system is needed for Mars transfers.
  7. Q.How do you envision the further development of the launchsite? A. More buildings.
  8. Here's some videos of Falcon 1 and Grasshopper, doing their thing! (Audience claps in appreciation) Wasn't that cool? Let's see our new toy fly! (Audience screams in terror, and rapidly stops being biology and becomes physics) Also, RIP Starman, you will forever be in our hearts!
  9. Gagarin's Start is being abandoned? *flashbacks to Eyes Turned Skyward* Lets hope that this is only a temporary lull in activity.
  10. @DDE Do you have a link to a write up on this? I've always been told that Venus has a very low rate of crustal recycling due to a very low level of water in the aesthenosphere, which means that Venus's upper mantle is too viscous to support proper plate tectonics. Venus's geothermal (Cytheriothermal?) heat load has nowhere to go without plate tectonics, so it just builds up in the upper mantle until almost the entire crust breaks up and gets covered in lava. This has always been seen as Venus's default state since its creation, so I wonder what new analyses has lead them to this?
  11. It would be great if just once, I was able to remember when these rockets launch. Japanese rocket launches are very rare, and there is only one more Kounotori launch scheduled.
  12. Maybe they'll have something like Falcon 9's landing gear, with three legs alternating with the fins? That fin doesn't look like it has any form of leg inside.
  13. The lander was doing some very odd somersaults on the live telemetry, so I think that it was either a computer issue, or an engine failure.
  14. Yeah, they're not trying to increase the stochiometric rating of the engine up to the exact figure, that would lower the Isp and make the engine even more of a technical marvel (for no benefit).
  15. It might still be quite bad. Winds and storm surges tend are worst on the northern edge of hurricanes, as the hurricanes motion adds to the local wind velocity.