MinimumSky5

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About MinimumSky5

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    Sr. Spacecraft Engineer

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  1. MinimumSky5

    Virgin Galactic, Branson's space venture

    No, I get where they were meant to go, but look closely at the diagram, the artist has given that guy a second set of knees in his thighs, that bend backwards.
  2. MinimumSky5

    SpaceX Discussion Thread

    But, the XLR81 was a gas generator... https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/XLR81
  3. MinimumSky5

    Virgin Galactic, Branson's space venture

    I'm sorry, but what has happened to that guys legs? Artists, take note, plan your drawings before committing to them!
  4. MinimumSky5

    Most succesful launches in a single 24 period?

    Electron/VCLS1/This One's For Pickering?
  5. MinimumSky5

    SpaceX Discussion Thread

    The air force have requested a newly built booster, and demended that it is not recovered... because reasons. Let's hope that they were charged far beyond what is reasonable for this, it's so idiotic.
  6. MinimumSky5

    BFR concepts and ideas thread.

    True, but developing a tug of that design is also very expensive, and surely not worth the effort, if BFR is cheap to launch. But your right, I didn't explain myself there well.
  7. MinimumSky5

    SpaceX Discussion Thread

    Aside from being, admittantly, spectacular if they did that, what reason would they have to cool the booster that fast? They don't seem to have had issues with temperature recently, and thermal stress would be a very significant concern, as has been noted.
  8. MinimumSky5

    BFR concepts and ideas thread.

    The problem with these ideas is that the business plan for the BFR requires large launch cadences, to spread the lifetime cost of the system out. The idea of an ion powered lunar tug simply will not work, as SpaceX could launch many, many flights to the moon with a fleet of Starships in the same time as one ion powered Starship would take to get there. Also, the costs of developing such a module would be very large, even for SpaceX (who, to be fair, seem to be able to develop new systems very cheaply).
  9. MinimumSky5

    BFR concepts and ideas thread.

    That would take decades, or need a much, much more powerful power source than what BFR has available now. Would you want to fly in a BFR with a small nuclear reactor meters from your cabin?
  10. MinimumSky5

    Russian Launch and Mission Thread

    No thermal blankets necessary... I so want to see the insulation flapping around as the Soyuz undocks!
  11. MinimumSky5

    Which Launch?

    No, sorry, the RS-27's were derived from the H-1, the RS-68's were new newly built. My point was the Delta family does have a Saturn heritage, but that that heritage is now no longer flying.
  12. MinimumSky5

    Which Launch?

    There is a very tenuous link, in that the main engine of the Delta II was derived from the H-1, and the Delta II was developed into the Delta III, which was further developed into the Delta IV...
  13. MinimumSky5

    SpaceX Discussion Thread

    Not quite. The X-33 was going for a full on SSTO, and as a result they needed to be extremely lightweight to get to orbit. Composite fuel tanks were one of the ways to do this, but they could get a fuel tank that wouldn't crack when filled (I'm not entirely sure why the struggled). Without the composite fuel tank, it couldn't get any payload into orbit, so it was abandoned after being used to test some VTVL techniques.
  14. I've never understood the secrecy that CNSA have towards their launches. This is either thumbing their nose at the Americans, or simple national pride, or genuine curiosity (in descending order of likely hood) and in all three cases, there is no reason to hide what you are doing. We know the design of the rockets and where they are launched, so this secrecy helps no one.
  15. MinimumSky5

    SpaceX Discussion Thread

    Yeah, looking at those engines, I don't think that this booster will ever go to space, today or otherwise. I suspect that it'll get torn down, and then displayed at Hawthorn. Or, maybe they'll donate it to a museum? I bet many aerospace museum curators would give several limbs to have a flight proven F9 display, especially if its the first one to ever be displayed!