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richfiles

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  1. Oh boy... They're multiplying, much like the DAC circuits that will control them! After putting YEARS into this project, I wanted the comfort of a spare... Last thing I want is to find the efforts of over half a decade go to waste cause the thing I bought in 2015 turned out to be busted. I have no way of testing any of this until I finish my synchro emulators. Having two simply offers me a safety margin. Biggest problem, these days, is free time. That's the deadly triangle of time and money vs labor... I can either have plenty of time, but no money, or no money, but plenty of time. Truth is, I'm terrible with time management. Heh... I need to spend less time wasting time, and make more efficient use of it. Had a whole weekend free, but blew it. I need to pick tasks and commit to those tasks. I need to finish building my main computer, I need to replace the chair in my living room, I need to finish my workshop computer, and I need to get back to work on the instrument panel.
  2. It's all shared above. Got these from a Case Tractor dealership. CNHI parts should be more or less available from any Case, New Holland, or International dealer. The switches are expensive, but not Honeywell expensive... One was just below $40 and the other was just under $60. Most of these dealerships can get parts from another if they dont have it. Alternatively, look for Concord Aerospace (they have an ebay presence) they produce NASA replica switches for cheaper than these. I just wanted to use a couple of them cause local source.
  3. That all depends if KSP 2 is as mod friendly as KSP is... Assuming the developer of the KSPSerialIO mod makes a KSP 2 version, and the data packet format remains the same, then I see no reason it shouldn't... I'm less trusting of Take Two. They have an abominable track record with handling mods. I have zero reservations with sticking to KSP if KSP 2's mod scene is whack.
  4. I bought the switches! Good Lord, these were terribly expensive, but I'll reserve the colored tab lever toggles for things like toggling my DC and AC busses on and off, for powering things like the meters and the FDAI. I'v3 actually been in touch with Concord Aerospace for sourcing some NASA style replica switches for the rest of the panel. I just kinda wanted these cause they were from the Tractor & Implement dealer where I live... They also had a locking toggle... It looked JUST like a NASA one... And cost the same too! Three digit price tag! Yikes... I passed at that price.
  5. And I got the job!!! Very excited to soon have a steady income again. The positive, is it should no longer be an issue to acquire parts. I do have less time available, sadly, but that's always the unfortunate trade off. On a positive note, I barely watch TV anymore, so there's less hours wasted on that! I also know for a fact (cause I've seen them in stock, with my own physical eyes), that a local farm implement dealer has two styles of tab lever type toggle switches, on hand, with either red or green plastic tab lever handles. I'll probably buy out their stock, and either paint them grey, or try to get the Concord switches and leave these colored for some special function. CNHI (Case New Holland Industrial) Is a manufacturer of agricultural machinery... tractors, harvesters, construction equipment, etc. If you see a red tractor or a blue tractor out in a field... good chance it's by this company. My dad was picking up parts and I tagged along that day. I sifted though all their switches in their parts drawers and found these. 1301521C1 is the red handled tab lever toggle switch, and 1301522C1 is the green handled tab lever toggle switch. These ARE still stupidly expensive, with one costing $30 a switch, and the other being $60. I don't know if it's an in production part, or NOS either, but it's a fallback if I fail to get the Concord switches in bulk. With real income back in play, I might even just inquire as to the cost of getting maybe 3 or 4 five switch gang panels, pre-made from them. That'd assuming they even communicate with me. I'm hoping any issues I had failing to get in touch just stemmed from lack of resources during lockdowns. Hopefully everything is going okay on their end now. Regardless, I at least have a fallback to rely on, if an expensive one...
  6. I have a metal sheet with an alodine coating (not quite the same as anodizing). I was gonna just mill out the openings for my "DSKY" indicators and readouts, and use that... It's so much more basic than the route you're going. That's actually really nice work! You really ought to consider starting a dedicated thread for your own build! It almost makes me wanna try 3D printing some manner of bezel and then painting it. Honestly though, I'd still be more inclined to mill a chunk of aluminum if I went that route... It'd be little difference than milling the alodined steel plate I had planned on using anyway. Whatever I do though, It can't be excessively thick, as my board wasn't designed with a lot of supported depth in mind. One small update... I'm applying for a new job. If I get it, the pay raise will be substantial. If all goes well, and I get it, I might make another go at trying to get in touch with Concord Aerospace on their switches. Lost touch with them in the middle of the 2020 mess, hopefully that doesn't happen this time...
  7. I should have done this YEARS ago... So, ten years ago, when I moved into my current apartment, I set up my workbench, and discovered it was WAY too low. Rather than take it apart to extend the legs, like I should have, I just took two different chairs, cobbled them together, and made a really low chair. It worked, for nearly 10 years... Thing is, the workbench was still way too low. I've always had issues with my back sitting at this thing. It was only 25 inches (63.5 cm) off the floor... The reason that this workbench was originally built to be so low, is It was originally used with a "proto-gamerchair" that I made in the late 1990s. Back when I was in college, I ended up scrapping a car, and saved the passenger seat out of it, and made a rather comfy computer chair from it. Had it for years, and I built my computer desk around that chair. I later also built this workbench around the same chair. After a decade or so, I removed the old seat, which had then worn out pretty badly, and replaced it with a newer car seat. When I moved to the apartment a decade ago, my computer desk and workbench were no longer adjacent in the same room... I could no longer just roll the chair between the two, and this required me to set up a different seating arrangement... It was not ideal... This year, I scrapped that car seat, and replaced the aging cushion of the replacement chair for the workbench. I've still not resolved the seating situation for my computer desk... Not that it exactly matters right now, with my computer still being dead... Thing is, I've not gotten much of anything done at my workbench lately, and I finally realized what the issue was... The new cushion... it was just enough added height, that the formerly borderline too low workbench was now harmfully too low! Every time I sat down to work, I'd be just in pain even 15 minutes in. Once I realized how bad this was, I knew what needed to be done... I jacked up my workbench, and installed leg extensions! The workbench now sits about 29 inches (73.6 cm) off the floor. It doesn't sound like much, but it really does make a huge difference! I borrowed a jack from a my father, and from a buddy of mine, and combined with my own car jack, I was able to lift the entire workbench, as it was, with all the equipment and tools left in place. I put the two smaller jacks on one side, and the larger one on the other side. With three jacks, I had three points of lift, and the workbench remained stable as could be throughout the entire process! It simply could not have gone smoother than it did, and I was so dumb for not just doing this years ago! My back already feels so much better! You can see the original height in this shot. I actually am tempted to try and get a new pair of car seats (probably find something from a junk yard someday)... Truth of the matter is, car seats are designed to be comfortable, even when sitting in them for long periods of time, and are made durable enough to last years. It's why I used my weird 1990s "gamerchair" for so long. I'm seeing a lot of comments that salvaged seats can be as little as $25-$100, and considering what commercial gamerchairs cost... and comparing the quality, this actually works well for me. I feel like if I find the right seat, I could really fine tune the overall ergonomics of this thing, and improve my comfort for long term build sessions. In addition to my workbench, I also have a desk in my workshop. This desk has been the universal "I'll deal with it later" space... And it has become terribly cluttered. Funny story... There was a box that sat on that desk since the first year I moved here... It was pushed back into the rear corner, and just sorta... took space. I finally cleared it out. Apparently it contained exactly one non local 1999-2000 phone book... That was it... I couldn't even be mad, cause it was so absurdly silly! One thing that has sat on the desk for years, pushed off to the side, was my Twentieth Anniversary Mac. It still boots up even! It's definitely in need of a recapping however, as the audio has developed a hum. Currently, it's configured with a PowerPC G3 CPU upgrade, 128 MB RAM, and the full TV/FM tuner/capture card. These old Macs had speakers supplied by BOSE, and sounded pretty decent. I mainly used to use this for playing music. I think it'd be fun restoring it... Dropping in an SSD and a network and USB card would make a world of difference. Networking can possibly be done with a USB network adapter, if I can't find the old Comm Slot II Ethernet card that this thing takes. I could also cannibalize the Comm Slot II card from another machine I have, if it comes down to it. More importantly, I am clearing off the desk because I want a large open space to actually work on large things, such as the cases for my two PC builds, vintage calculators or computers, and of course, the Kerbal Instrument panel itself. The workbench was built at a time when my primary work was making cable harnesses and soldering circuit boards. Hobby wise, I was 99% working on tiny robots and again... more circuit boards. As a result, I designed the workbench to hold electronic test equipment on a middle an upper shelf, and the main shelf has extra lighting, but also only has 7.25 inches (18.5 cm) of vertical clearance beyond the first 12 inches (30 cm) of bench depth (the bench has double that depth, but the second shelf severely limits the available vertical height beyond the first 12 inches of surface depth). This means that as I've shifted to wanting to work on larger things, I don't actually have a good space to do so on. The side wings of the workbench are open, but they are not that large either. Clearing this desk will make a world of difference for my ability to do large projects. This was the other project occupying my time... I wanted a high resolution ultrawide monitor that I could slide and tilt and rotate to either be right in front of my face or out of the way. When I need to have schematics, diagrams, blueprints, parts lists, etc. right in my face while I work, without blocking the actual workbench below, I can slide it right in front of me. Other times, I want to be able to slide the whole thing off to the side and out of my way, for when I maybe want to have youtube videos or some kind of background content going, while I focus on my work. The monitor is made from a pair of iPad Retina LCD modules, and a pair of HDMI to LCD converter boards. They are mounted behind a polycarbonate panel in a simple frame made from U-channel aluminum. The total resolution is 4096x1536 (two 2048x1536 panels), and requires dual HDMI signals to drive. The tablet is my only working PC right now, and it only has one HDMI out, which is why only one side is lit at the moment. The overall display width is about 16 inches (40.6 cm), and 6 inches (15.25 cm) tall. The bezel adds an inch to both dimensions, so the overall dimensions are 17 inches (43.2 cm) wide and 7 inches (17.75 cm) tall. These dimensions are very compatible with my workbench, and permit me to see the work area without interference. I did add a ventilation grill later on, because I noticed some heat being trapped by the enclosure. It wasn't extreme, but it's still good to vent it. I picked up a cable chain and installed a pair of long HDMI cables and a cable to carry power. I also picked up a 12v switching power supply, which will be set up on the bench to provide power to both LCD modules in the monitor, as well as LED lighting upgrades that I plan to install. The old florescent lighting causes visible banding on the rolling shutter of my phone's camera, and it makes taking pictures of my work kind of a pain. Since the LEDs will be DC, there should be no flicker and thus no more banding in photos. I haven't installed this yet. The slide rail and the tilt/pivot were made from a closet door slide and a GoPro bicycle handlebar mount. Pretty simple, but it works! I found a local-ish supplier for Teflon washers, and used a combination of fender washers and the Teflon washers to create the slides. The screws securing the slide rails are flush, except for the two on the end, which act as stops. Honestly, it works quite well! When I install the power supply and the cable chain, I'm gonna pull this all apart and hard wire the power across both controller boards. That will permit me to plug in only one power connector and have both LCD modules power up. I'd also like to make an aluminum port plate to cover the bottom. I may paint the frame as well. The overall construction is just layers of plastic cut out from an old Gamestop poster hanger. All the cuts were just done with an X-Acto knife and a metal ruler. I just layered the different layers together, and held it all together with screws. This part was fun to cut out. I wanted to enclose the boards and the button panels, but leave space for the ports and connections. The area with the buttons needed to be thinner, so I cut out the diffuser from an old LCD TV to close off those spaces and cover the circuit boards, while leaving the buttons accessible. I used a hole punch (the kind used to punch holes in paper) to make the button holes. Added benefit, is the LEDs on the button boards shine through the diffuser. Whatever works, right! I needed to raise the back panel by two layers to clear the tallest parts on the converter PC boards. This project turned out exceptionally well! Honestly, I'm hoping that with all the improvements to my workspace, I can get back to actually making progress. Cash is still critically low, but I hope to at least try to work with what I have on hand, at least for the time being. I still have made no attempt to repair the broken Radar Altimeter, aside from just ordering the replacement motor. I have not finished the Vertical Velocity Meter, nor started on the ΔV Carriage Meter either... I haven't even started on the DAC boards, considering my PC is currently dead. I have to get some stuff done for work first, but then I want to focus on finishing setting up the desk workspace. My first priority will be to get my main and my workshop PCs built. New chairs are also a high priority. After that, I hope to get back onto the Kerbal Instrument panel, now with the added benefit of SPACE to work with!
  8. So... Regarding that power transformer for my apartment swallowed by the Earth. As mentioned last month, when it collapsed, it seems to have caused a massive power surge. In the month that's passed since, I'm finding out that not only was my computer damaged, but other things, such as lights too. Half the lights in my apartment have either failed, or are currently flickering like they're getting ready to fail. Man, that surge was DEVASTATING to my electronics... On a positive note, parts at work are finally showing up again, but only one of the two big customers (that I personally build things for) has orders out right now. The other has been kinda quiet lately... Man, I need these orders... It's just so bad right now! Needless to say... The Kerbal Instrument Panel project is stalled out, cause I just don't have cash right now...
  9. I'm actually not a fan of traditional joysticks, in the sense of wrist operated control. I'm more of a fingertip control type. For me, the industrial joysticks will be far more comfortable to use for long play sessions, and more precise. I've recently considered that adding a gel pad to the bottom edge might also greatly enhance the comfort level. It's my one big "I don't need this to be 1:1 with NASA" contention. Regarding the computer dying... that's the main power transformer for my apartment. It was not hit by a truck... The foundation deteriorated from poor maintenance, and the ground literally swallowed up the transformer. When it collapsed, it cause a massive power surge. In the month that's passed since, I'm finding not only was my computer damaged, but other things, such as lights. Half the lights in my apartment have either failed, or are flickering and appear ready to fail. That surge was DEVASTATING to my electronics...
  10. Still alive, dead broke. Just still incredibly frustrated at everything going on right now... Oh yeah, and my computer got fried when the above incident occurred. I now am still alive, dead broke, and without my main computer!?!? I just... I can't even right now. At this point, I don't even know what even even is. My brain just completely blanks when trying think how to move forward again... How does this even happen!? God, I hate being broke... I hate my computer and my projects breaking.
  11. My only guess is time and deterioration... And maybe that downspout behind it caused erosion over time? Who knows. Now I need to find some kind of old obsolete Mac, so I can make the installer for the new computer... To make a new Hackintosh, you need a working Mac OS machine to create the installer. If I can find something like an old MacBook or iMac or an ancient Mac Mini, that'd be perfect. Of course... Being broke, thanks to parts shortages and shipping delays... and no work, I'm just up a creek with no paddle...
  12. Well, you sure don't see that every day... Apartment lost half it's power... one of the two phases of the split phase feed went out. In the US, residential power is generally delivered as 240 volts with a center neutral. Higher power devices such as ovens, clothes dryers, etc. will get the full 240 volts. Common wall outlets and lighting are fed from one phase or the other phase, to neutral, providing 120 volts. The city was pretty quick to fix it. Problem is, when the power failed, it also killed my computer.
  13. My ear looks like I just got it pierced... I didn't... It's just a very sore bump that appeared yesterday... Ow... Still dealing with low hours and parts shortages... I hate being this broke...
  14. Just feeling incredibly frustrated lately... My replacement motor arrived for the damaged tape meter for my Kerbal Instrument Panel project. I haven't lifted a finger to work on it in ages. I've been busy with work, busy dealing with family tragedies, busy helping my mother prepare for a guest (I'm happy about the latter, but it still has taken time, and is tinged with the unfortunate reality of having only one visitor vs two)... I just feel spent lately, and I have nothing to show for my efforts, besides a really satisfying sewing room setup at my mother's place. I'm getting no where... Work is being held back due to the parts shortages, and the only work I still have doesn't pay me very well for my time. I feel like I've been busy as ever, but I have nothing to show for it, personally or income wise. Even when I do have time for the controller project, I'm stuck right now, cause I can't even afford parts to move forward with it. The things I can do, I just haven't had the energy for... Everything else has just been overwhelming, and it has severely impacted on my overall focus. I'm tired of being broke. I'm tired of being sick and tired all the time... Tired of my smoke machine and my car being the same machine. Tired of feeding that beast oil and gasoline. Tired of the economy and the atrocious news of the world and everything that having to look out the window or turn on the TV entails... Is it too much to just want things to go well for a change? At least the sewing room turned out really nice!
  15. Heh... I think I'll pass on that... I did help a friend install a not quite so large massager chair motor onto a car seat pulled from a car I scrapped We mounted the seat to a frame, along with a racing wheel and pedals, and wired it into his PS1 controller, way back in the late 90s. So, despite parts shortages, shipping delays, and logistics nightmares, my replacement motor for the tape meter just arrived, against all odds... Unfortunately, I've simply been dealing with way too much to even have a chance to look at it... Work is tied up in a product that doesn't have the best return on my time, and we are suffering from parts shortages on better paying work. Unfortunately, this means I'm struggling to just pay bills, much less blow money on parts. Work on the controller has been at a stand still. There was a recent family loss, along with planning for a family visit, so I've been helping my mother out with things too. Rearranged and moved things around at her place to set up her sewing room in a different space, to free up a bedroom for her guest. Honestly, I'm very satisfied with the setup. She likes it, and even her cat likes the new changes. Amazing, right! I'm happy things are coming together elsewhere, but it is unrelated to the controller, unless I ask her to sew me an instrument panel cover! For me... Things have been slow, and they've been a struggle. If things don't pick up, I will definitely need to find a second job, just to get by. In the meanwhile, I'm sitting here frustrated that things are still not getting done. I'm still around, haven't gone anywhere. I'm just so tied up and so broke right now.
  16. https://www.aliexpress.com/item/4000143910873.html While not a perfect drop in, they do offer both analog and digital versions. This is what I'm using on my currently very damaged Radar Altimeter Tape Meter, as well as what I plan to use for my Delta V Carriage Meter. My only complaint about them, is the cost per unit. they feel kinda spendy, but when you realize they incorporate hall sensor, interface, shaft, bearing, and housing into one standard unit... It's kinda worth it. No idea if this is suited to your application or not, but it's ideal for my application. Good luck with your project, whatever it is you're working on.
  17. No, no, no, no, no... Oh man... It's worse than I thought. The electrical tab on the motor easily popped out, letting the motor turn again. That actually unbound the motor, but it still won't run smooth unless all the hardware is loosened, because of how warped everything is... Now that the motor spins... I can see that repair was pointless, the shaft is bent, and it feeds into the tightest bearing stack of the whole assembly. Motor might spin, but the gearbox output shaft is unusable. As annoying as this is, its just a shipment from China to replace it... The real issue though, is the PRIMARY REEL DRUM has a deformed tooth, and it now snags the tape itself. This is literally the worst possible scenario... This is actual damage to the tape feed mechanism itself. I can try to file it, but if that fails to fix the issue, I'm not really sure what to do. I might be forced to part out my backup unit. This is literally the worst case outcome. It's nearly a complete rebuild from scratch at this point, if I end up having to do that! I'm so mad right now... I've been busy with work, so I haven't had time to sit down and work with this. I wanted to get back to my vertical velocity meter and actually finish that, since it's so close to done (which I will probably do before this, cause I'm so frustrated and dang it, I need that dopamine high of actually completing something, vs being sent back to stage 0)... This is yet another setback to starting the Synchro Emulator DAC boards or starting the Delta V Carriage Meter mechanism... I just... I haven't felt this defeated by a setback in a long time... I put 7 months into building this assembly, and it took just a second to destroy it. I hate this so much...
  18. The Kraken really seems to have done a number on this piece... Man, it is SO warped... Honestly, I don't think there's a single straight plate left in the whole entire mechanism. I don't think I can straighten the plates out well enough to not still cause binding in the bearings... I hate to say this, but I think I may have to start entirely from scratch with these plates... I think I'm looking at scrap metal here...
  19. I dropped my Radar Altimeter Tape Meter assembly, one of the more complex parts for my Kerbal Instrument Panel... Shirt sleeve snagged it and yeeted it towards the floor. It's badly warped, all the mechanisms are bound, the motor itself is damaged, and it's going to take complete disassembly, and replacement of probably half the hardware to get it up and operating again. It's BAD... Not unrepairable, but a LOT of work to fix. It took nearly the entire sum whole of 2020 to design, order and receive parts for, and build this assembly... April till October. I'm mad... All the work I put into the device below... and it's ded now... (Downloadable Imgur link) https://imgur.com/a/8drH6V6.mp4 ***EDIT*** Oh man... It's worse than I thought. Was able to do a quick fix for the motor, but now that the motor spins... I can see that repair was pointless, the shaft is bent, Even worse though, is the TAPE FEED DRUM has a deformed tooth, and it now snags the tape itself. This is literally worst possible scenario... This is actual damage to the tape feed mechanism itself. I don't even know what to do anymore...
  20. Small update, one I am not happy to make... The Radar Altimeter Tape Meter experienced some unexpected lithobraking, and is now non-functional. Shirt sleeve caught a corner and yeeted it right off the shelf where I had it stored. The mechanism is completely bound up, and worse... One of the gearmotor leads appears jammed half WAY into the motor. I get nothing but high current draw when trying to power it. It's completely busted right now. The good news, is most of the warping appears to be the screws and standoffs holding the sandwiched layers of the mechanism together. If I take it all apart, pound the aluminum sheets flat again, and replace any bent hardware, it should be unbound again. As for the motor, rather than order a replacement from China, which will take forever, I'll just disassemble the gearbox from the motor, and as long as no teeth are broken, I should be able to replace the motor from one of the other ratio gearmotors I ordered (remember that I ordered the wrong ratio motor, initially, so I have a spare motor). Even if it is likely recoverable, it still sucks. I had only a limited supply of those standoffs, leftover from my old job, and if I have to replace warped ones, it could cost a bit to order them, as the local hardware store has a limited stock. That, and It's always annoying to have something that's otherwise finished, be set back so severely. Grrr... I'm mad...
  21. Hmm... an idea... Adjusting tongue to most optimal angle for creative thought... So, the Navball is obviously the star of this show, and has been highlighted lately by my working on the power supply for it, and soon the controller for it. For the longest time, mounting it, along with what sits around it had always been in flux until very recently. I'm now quite sold on the current position and the current order of instruments, with the current bezel configuration including three rate of rotation meters and the velocity readout. One issue has been the fact that due to the angle of the front instrument panel, the rear of the Navball housing, and by extension, the tape meter, was likely going to stick out below the plane of the bottom panel, and require a "pan" to enclose. I was fine with this fact. One area of concern was what cutting slots for the rate of rotation bargraph PC boards would do to the overall strength of the Instrument panel. The Navball is the heaviest of all my individual instruments, and was designed to be supported from the front bezel. I was trying to find ways not to slot the panel surrounding where the Navball would mount, but now I think I might have an entirely different strategy for mounting. If I cut a "U" shaped channel in the instrument panel plate surrounding the Navball, and bend it inward, the Navball will have a flatter facing front (which doesn't matter much as the whole ball is round), and this will leave a full gap both at the bottom and on either side of the Navball. If I use a pair of brackets to secure the bottom of the Navball to the front panel to preserve the gap at the bottom while reintroducing rigidity, then I'll have a gap all the way around to support rate meters on both sides, and below the Navball... I can create a bezel that has a much shallower angle, and let the bottom rate of rotation meter sit at an angle that transitions well between the horizontal control panel and the near vertical instrument panel. It buys me vertical room, which makes mounting the velocity readout easier. It also allows a much more shallow mounting angle, and could help reduce the depth of the pan required to close off the hardware on the bottom panel. Reworking the tape meter only involves re-drilling 6 holes, where the belt frame mounts to the main housing of the tape feed assembly. Those holes simply determine the angle the two assemblies sit against one another, at the point where they both attach together. Hopefully you can imagine it... No time to do a sketch up of it. At the moment, I have circuit boards to solder for work again (Thank goodness)! I've not had regular work since October, thanks to the stupid parts shortage, and the bank account has gotten pretty low. I'll be doing more brainstorming than building for the next two weeks, at least. Man, I'm just glad to have work again!
  22. Always be careful around garage door springs... If it's still under tension, and anything looks even remotely off, I'd bail and get a professional who actually knows garage doors. Those springs are normally under enough tension to potentially end a person's free ride on spaceship Earth... Do not take them lightly! They're wound with enough force to basically lift a small wall up and over your head, and they take so much of the brunt of the force, that a teeny little motor and a plastic gear can handle lifting and lowering this "small wall" for however many decades your opener lasted. Another thing to be weary of, is that a disturbing number of modern openers are appearing with "smart" features that are merely ways to lock you into a subscription model, just to operate the dumb thing. Always read the fine print. Corporations in recent years have been getting very greedy over IoT style subscription plans, and are tacking them wherever they can for those added revenue streams.
  23. I spent a little more for entirely enclosed absolute position sensors with a bearing mounted shaft and a fully assembled and closed housing. These are exactly what you have, but with a digitally derived analog output, instead of a serial interface. 0-360° outputs 0-5 volts. Three axes absolute positions can be driven by just 3 signal wires and 2 power wires. They are light weight, have an integrated bearing and shaft, and could be utilized to potentially simplify the overall design, vs trying to mount an open PC board and a loose magnet. I do love these Absolute Position Sensors. They really are a game changer! I do certainly hope you are still pursuing this project. It has great potential, and I feel like you were getting much closer to a working solution for the project. Shortcuts like preassembled absolute position sensors and using PC boards as mounting plates could very much streamline the project. I wish you good luck and good progress. Also hope you're doing well... You've not logged in since last summer.
  24. Ah, me too! Still ate ramen for a month to afford it! I've mentioned before, it was originally part of an Israeli F-4 Phantom flight trainer. I think people were reluctant to buy it, due to it being international shipping, possibly. I spent $70 something in shipping costs alone... Honestly, it was well worth it though. I've never seen one go for as cheap in the years since I originally snagged mine. I took the gamble, mainly because it was pulled form a working simulator, simply because it was being retired... The F-4 is a very old jet, after all! Honestly, three axis navballs are just very rare on ebay. They don't pop up very often, and if they are flight rated, they'll generally be over a grand. Mine was rated for simulator use only, so it sold for way cheaper. It's amazing how many 2 axis balls are out there. They really do clutter up the search results, and it makes finding a good 3 axis ball very tedious. 2 axis balls are less useful for space applications, where orientation can easily be situated in all three axes. The two axis units also can be misleading too... If they utilize an integrated gyroscope that is vacuum or electrically driven, then the indicator is 100% useless. If it is a remote sending unit... that is a remotely oriented gyroscope sends signals to control the two axes, then it can still potentially be used... Displaying pitch and roll is typical for commercial and small aircraft, along with having a heading indicator display yaw separately. For space applications, one could have toggles to toggle yaw and pitch, or yaw and roll on a pair of such indicators, but it's universally less intuitive for space operations than a unified three axis navball. That's why I've been so determined to get it up and functioning!
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