Hcube

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Everything posted by Hcube

  1. Monday, wednesday, thursday, friday, saturday, sunday. Did i miss anything ?
  2. it's not debris, it's something on the side of the barge
  3. il y a un début à tout ^^ bienvenue par contre la communauté française sur ce forum est quasi inexistante, tout le contenu ou presque est en anglais
  4. If they do put a dragon on mars by 2018 or maybe 2020, it will only be useful as a demonstrator of powered landing on mars... There's no way a dragon will be used for a manned trip to mars, so the "red dragon" is probably not so much of a big deal
  5. Every soyuz landing is hard, by definition The astronauts actually get paid to fly
  6. Just put it in water to measure its volume, and then, if there is enough muscle on it, it's usually safe to assume that the density is 1.
  7. Yeah i could see some very cool uses for this, if we were able to transfer data in unmanned vessels, it would be possible to do sample-recovery missions hayabusa-style, where only a small shielded part comes back, holding all the data. This could also work very well if we could store the data in the probe core like @pthigrivi suggested
  8. Yeah, a mini radial decoupler would be awesome. You know you can set the ejection force on any decoupler from 0 to 100%, right ?
  9. You misunderstood me. I'm not saying "if it's possible to do it for manoeuvers then it can be done as easily for ships" , i know it's only a vector magnitude. What i'm saying is that from a *gameplay* point of view it makes no sense to have this ∆v information without any way to know how much ∆v a ship has. Also @zarakon
  10. I don't understand how we can have a ∆v readout for manoeuver nodes and kspedia explaining what it is, and yet we can't know how much delta V our ship has. It makes literally no sense to me EDIT : i'm talking about a gameplay point of view. Not about technical doability of a ∆v-meter. Gameplay wise, i think that this situation is just like having the pricetag but being unable to look how much money you've got in your wallet
  11. ... I don't see the point of doing this anyway. The stage *did* destroy the deck
  12. I'm trying to quote @J.Random's quote here but it's not working and that quote up there won't go away... (That new forum though x_x ) Err...this comparaison is pretty much meaningless because it's not like the stage came down like a feather without any energy... It must have had A LOT of kinetic energy. The actual pressure equivalent was probably orders of magnitude higher than 22t/m²
  13. Obligatory "Jet fuel can't melt steel beams !" On a more serious note i agree 100% with that, there's no way the plume (even if it's pure O2 oxidizer) could melt the barge in one or two seconds... The stage probably simply hit the barge hard
  14. The A400M does crash during testing though (I know it's not relevant, no need to start a thread war about this, it's just funny)
  15. They'll never keep up to that schedule, it's way too much
  16. I'm really surprised that there's no way to relay signal from just the other side of the planet. Aren't there any antennas that can be used there ? Or a satellite network ? Pretty astonishing for me that they have to wait for the rotation of the earth to get that signal.
  17. Maybe because it's fueled w/ hypergolics, it doesn't need an umbilical, and so it was all simpler to do without any launch clamps ? Just guessing
  18. I'm afraid this is not true since the video on ROSCOSMOS's channel is in very good resolution
  19. God the quality of ESA's video is afwul. Seriously this is 2016 and one of ESA's most important missions, and the video is only 45 seconds long and in 240p... And then there's spaceX with 1080p stream even though it's a private company... This is pretty embarrassing
  20. Dang it, i have a (boooring) biotech class during the launch Looks cloudy anyway
  21. Apart from it's launch platform, the rocket itself is pretty much standard </annoying>
  22. This is interesting but again it's just a bunch of suppositions