Jump to content

DunaManiac

Members
  • Posts

    1,213
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Reputation

1,940 Excellent

Profile Information

  • About me
    The Next Generation
  • Location
    I'd say that it's fairly likely that I'm on the Earth.

Recent Profile Visitors

8,487 profile views
  1. Took a little drive from my small Munar base to a probe that landed a year earlier to service it and deploy a drilling unit and seismometer. Its a 35 kilometer drive to the northeast. I encountered this arch completely by chance. Technically I found it when I landed the lander earlier, but I was dying to visit it.
  2. I've begun another mission using a mothership; Jewel 2, in order to construct a station in orbit around the Mun and land an outpost. It carries about 10 kerbals; 4 kerbals commanding the vessel and 6 kerbals to command the station which will be constructed in LMO. The mothership itself is not new, this is its third mission, or its first to the Mun. This also is the first mission where the entire payload was brought to the mothership through spaceplanes as opposed to rockets. The ship itself is rather flimsy because of the amount of girder segments which make up the solar arrays. Once orbital insertion is complete, the reconstruction of the station can commence with the tug I used After several orbits worth of time, the station itself was finally assembled. The next thing to do is to land the base. I'm aiming for the basin of a large crater to the south of a Munar arch found by an earlier lander. With the base on the ground, the skycrane returns to the station. And finally, the lander is deployed with the rover and 2 kerbals to spend the munar night together in the base before continuing operations. The mothership itself will remain in orbit for the next 55 days before it leaves as well.
  3. Encountered a lovely allignment involving 5 planets (Eve is not visible in this shot), the Mun, and even a comet (the dot closest to the sun) completely unexpectedly while performing a routine mission launching a satellite bound for Eve.
  4. In addition to the two probes, I've also sent two landers to Duna; the Duna General Landers 1 and 2. I aimed to launch them at the same time, like the DEPTH probes (which I actually got quite literally minutes apart), but they ended up arriving 20 days apart from one another. DGL1 is the only one to have arrived yet. The lander has been travelling with its spent nuclear stage, which doubles as a communications and power bus. The aeroshell itself has airbrakes and some engines mounted on trusses to help slow it down. ' Separation goes smoothly. We're aiming for a lowland region near the entrance to a canyon that may have once been a river, a region that would have been rich with life if it ever existed. Reentry is fairly slow, and we deploy our rockets in order to adjust our landing site. The aeroshell is detatched and the 3 drogue chutes deploy to further slow us down. The lander has its own propulsion system, and the upper equipment bus is separated, leaving the lander to descend on its own fuel. Touchdown is successful. The lander deploys its communication and camera tower, and its solar panels. The lander is chock full with scientific experiments, including a drill capable of drilling deeper for life. The containers contain some deployable science experiments in the hopes that future colonists will be able to open it and better study this region with the aid of the experiments. It also has a large data storage module for future kerbals to access. And the lander begins its lonely stay on the Red planet.
  5. My two probes, the Duna Exploration Probe and Topographical Heightmapper (DEPTH) 1 and 2 have been contiuning their operations in the Duna-Ike consortium.
  6. I also took a couple of shots from my two Duna Probes; DEPTH 1 and 2. I took a few exterior shots and some other captures using the Hullcam VDS cameras while on approach to Duna and around Duna. A shot of Duna from outside of Duna's SOI at extreme zoom. A false color image of the richest ore deposits of the northern poles by DEPTH 1. An image from a flyby of Ike by DEPTH 2. DEPTH 2 seen here on approach to Ike. A shot of a canyon from DEPTH 1. A shot from DEPTH 2. A view of Duna over Ike's north pole filtered through the faint haze surrounding Ike.
  7. Kerbal Construction Time actually adds a new dimension to the game. This seems counter-intuitive, how could adding time constraints possibly add anything to the game aside from realism? I've found that it fundamentally changes the way that you play the game, especially when combined with life-support mods. For one thing, it forces you to plan your missions, rather than launching willy-nilly as you would in stock, you design and launch in a much more methodical method. It makes you ask questions like, which launches should go where at what time? What launches can you fill in the meantime? It also means that your launches are more spaced-out, so you don't have to launch rockets one after another all the time, or wait long-stretches between windows. Secondly, I've found that it gives spaceplanes a new meaning in sandbox mode. The way that Kerbal Construction Time works, is that reusable vessels are stored, so they can be relaunched much faster than constructing a rocket. So, by constructing spaceplanes, you can have them shoulder the burden of resupply missions rather than diverting time from your main missions. You can also use them to peruse side projects independently of your main build queue.
  8. This is a snapshot of a mission to the mothership, Jewel 2, currently interred in LKO awaiting its next mission, using one my largest spaceplanes. The spaceplane was to deliver modules for a space station that Jewel 2 will deliver and assemble over the Mun, which can be seen on the right.
  9. Your suggestion does imply that, however. Jetpacks have both superior mobility and range than tethers do. So tethers imply that jetpacks are either unavailable or impractical. The latter case is true in real life, but none of these reasons are true in KSP, which are both extremely powerful and efficient compared to its real life counterpart. So as it stands, apart from helping out newbies, tethers are simply outclassed. Also, don't see how the scenario you shared supports the addition of tethers. If one is on a solar orbit there should be no reason that he or she is out of propellant, or even far away from his or her vessel. Tethers also can't assist in rescues either, as if a kerbal presumably has a missing or broken tether its useless, unless you're suggesting it can be fired like a harpoon.
  10. You can't get rid of jetpacks! What about all those hapless kerbals on the mun? What will they use to get back in the cabin? Ladders? Who's ever heard of those? Jokes aside, for me the biggest problem with eva is not that it's difficult to control, but that it's imprecise. A tether would not solve that problem. A better way to do it would be to make jet packs more precise so that you could suspend yourself in one place while using eva construction, or adding handrails on more parts by default.
  11. I've sent at least 1 manned mission and return from almost every planet and moon. I've sent incalculable amounts of missions to Mun and Minmus, with setting up bases and outposts of various sizes. I've sent several missions to Eve orbit and Gilly, but never have l actually attempted a landing there. I've sent numerous manned vessels to Duna and Ike. I've sent at least one manned mission to Dres, and I've sent a manned mission to but never returned from Eeloo. In the Jool system I've done a Jool 5. Even did a Moho mission with an absolute monster of a vessel.
  12. Ah, I see the problem.I believe they want you to go in a retrograde orbit. The only time that you will see an AN of 180 deg is when you are orbiting in the opposite direction as your target, such as if you are prograde and your target is moving in a retrograde orbit, and vice versa. So what you should have done is when you launched, you should have gone in the opposite direction as you ordinarily do, i.e towards the mountains rather than over the ocean. Since your inclination is alright, you should just change your orbit to a retrograde orbit, and you should be alright
  13. I've designed a probe with a functional scan platform and a small lander that'll be headed to Vall in the next 90 days. (Disregard the Decoupler.) The lander is mounted in that place because I have to stay within the strict 2.5 meter allowance of the cargo bay. It has all the scanning components one needs, including a camera.
  14. The explosions never happen because mass cannot be created or destroyed, therefore there cannot be any explosions on the non-existent pipes above you.
  15. A good old fashioned RUD. Hadn't had one of these in a while. This apocalyptic scene was caused while I was attempting to launch a small drone to Laythe, and I accidentally stage the fairings immediately after launch, which can be seen below.
×
×
  • Create New...