KG3

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About KG3

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    Spacecraft Engineer

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  1. Has anyone ever tried to depict a sunrise from the surface of a neutron star? I know it would be difficult to stand on the surface of a neutron star and there are a bunch of reasons why there aren't many stories that take place on neutron stars so there probably isn't any reason to visualize this like they did with the black hole in the movie Interstellar. I realize the neutron star would have to be rotating very slowly (for a neutron star) and the "sun" would be orbiting around it instead of vice versa and at a distance where it wasn't dumping its outer surface onto the neutron star because that would just be a nuisance.
  2. Could one of these rods be used to sample the interior of a comet or asteroid? I know that the Deep Impact spacecraft used a 372 kilogram cooper impactor to make a 150 meter wide crater on comet Temple 1. Could an 11 ton tungsten rod travel straight through a comet for reasons of science?
  3. Thanks for passing the article along! It does seem that getting carbon from the atmosphere has got to be easier than digging it out of the ground. Why isn't this talked about more and how much is being invested in research? It sounds like a very logical step.
  4. Biofuel could but plant based fuel takes up a lot of land. For instance, forests get cut down and replaced with palm oil plantations. Yes, a few years ago it sounded like they were really onto something! They were saying that they would be able to turn CO2, water and light into a useful carbohydrate and do it much more efficiently than plant based photosynthesis. I haven't heard anything about this recently. What would happen if there was an efficient way to take carbon out of the atmosphere instead of digging it out of the ground and 7 billion people adopted this technology overnight?
  5. Does anybody know the current status of artificial photosynthesis? A researcher named Paul Alivisatos who is affiliated with Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and works with nanotechnology was saying back in 2012 that they were close to a breakthrough in artificial photosynthesis. I can't seem to find anything more recent about progress in this field. I know Alivisatos is still working because he received the 2019 Welch Award in chemistry. Did they hit a roadblock or does "close to a breakthrough" mean I need to be more patient?
  6. Yes, although I wouldn't use it directly on the zombies. Putting felled trees in the path of oncoming zombies is a great strategy. Zombies would have a difficult time navigating through the crowns of the trees and get impaled on branches and stuck in crotches. If you can find a thorny tree such as Black Locust or Hawthorn all the better.
  7. So what would your rocket nozzle look like if you were trying to take off from the surface of Venus?
  8. In the prequel Caprica you find that the Cylons programming is based on the consciousness of a surly teenage girl.
  9. What happens when a single antiproton hits an atom? I'm assuming it only takes out a single proton's worth of mass from that atom. Does it simply change the atom's atomic number and create a different element or does it cause some sort of fission reaction, blowing the atom to pieces? Is it possible to get a bigger bang for your antimatter buck by using single antiprotons with a fissionable element?
  10. Is there any way to tell the difference between a proton that was created by the big bang billions of years ago and a proton that was created very recently like minutes ago in a particle accelerator?
  11. I believe I've read an article about this somewhere recently. Yes there could but to keep the water from boiling away at the surface (I'm assuming you meant liquid water) the planet would need to be massive enough that the water at the core would be compressed into a form of ice.
  12. Explosive Bolts, I saw recently that the Saturn rockets used retractable hold downs to keep the rocket on the launch pad while the engines powered up but the Space Shuttle used explosive bolts. What are explosive bolts? I've heard of them before but don't know anything about them. I imagine a technician with a torque wrench very carefully tightening a nut, hoping he doesn't loose any fingers! Are they anything like the bolts I might see at a hardware store?