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jimmymcgoochie

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  1. jimmymcgoochie's post in How to make a new install of KSP was marked as the answer   
    It really is as simple as copy and pasting the whole KSP directory to make a second copy. But before starting anything, a few things to consider:
    Where did you get KSP from? It’s really easy to get different versions of KSP via Steam, but doing so via other platforms e.g. the KSP store might be a bit more difficult. For RO/RP-1 you want to use KSP 1.10.2, don’t use anything newer as they’re not yet compatible and you’ll have a lot of headaches with it (I know, I run my RP-1 game in 1.11…) Did you put mods into your only copy of KSP? If yes, copy the whole KSP folder and paste it somewhere else (desktop would do for now) to keep your existing modded game and saves safe. With that done, delete the original copy and reinstall a fresh copy of KSP 1.10.2, then make a copy of that right away and save that on your desktop too. Add all your RSS/RO/RP-1 mods to this new copy of 1.10.2, best done via CKAN. You should end up with two copies of KSP on your desktop- the original one with your current mods and saves in it and a new one with RSS/RO/RP-1 in it- and a plain stock copy which you can then use to create more copies of KSP in the future.
    It’s always a good idea to backup your saves separately before doing any mod installation or game copying, do that first and avoid the horror of losing your saves to corruption or just deleting something you shouldn’t have.
  2. jimmymcgoochie's post in How to make a new install of KSP was marked as the answer   
    It really is as simple as copy and pasting the whole KSP directory to make a second copy. But before starting anything, a few things to consider:
    Where did you get KSP from? It’s really easy to get different versions of KSP via Steam, but doing so via other platforms e.g. the KSP store might be a bit more difficult. For RO/RP-1 you want to use KSP 1.10.2, don’t use anything newer as they’re not yet compatible and you’ll have a lot of headaches with it (I know, I run my RP-1 game in 1.11…) Did you put mods into your only copy of KSP? If yes, copy the whole KSP folder and paste it somewhere else (desktop would do for now) to keep your existing modded game and saves safe. With that done, delete the original copy and reinstall a fresh copy of KSP 1.10.2, then make a copy of that right away and save that on your desktop too. Add all your RSS/RO/RP-1 mods to this new copy of 1.10.2, best done via CKAN. You should end up with two copies of KSP on your desktop- the original one with your current mods and saves in it and a new one with RSS/RO/RP-1 in it- and a plain stock copy which you can then use to create more copies of KSP in the future.
    It’s always a good idea to backup your saves separately before doing any mod installation or game copying, do that first and avoid the horror of losing your saves to corruption or just deleting something you shouldn’t have.
  3. jimmymcgoochie's post in How to make a new install of KSP was marked as the answer   
    It really is as simple as copy and pasting the whole KSP directory to make a second copy. But before starting anything, a few things to consider:
    Where did you get KSP from? It’s really easy to get different versions of KSP via Steam, but doing so via other platforms e.g. the KSP store might be a bit more difficult. For RO/RP-1 you want to use KSP 1.10.2, don’t use anything newer as they’re not yet compatible and you’ll have a lot of headaches with it (I know, I run my RP-1 game in 1.11…) Did you put mods into your only copy of KSP? If yes, copy the whole KSP folder and paste it somewhere else (desktop would do for now) to keep your existing modded game and saves safe. With that done, delete the original copy and reinstall a fresh copy of KSP 1.10.2, then make a copy of that right away and save that on your desktop too. Add all your RSS/RO/RP-1 mods to this new copy of 1.10.2, best done via CKAN. You should end up with two copies of KSP on your desktop- the original one with your current mods and saves in it and a new one with RSS/RO/RP-1 in it- and a plain stock copy which you can then use to create more copies of KSP in the future.
    It’s always a good idea to backup your saves separately before doing any mod installation or game copying, do that first and avoid the horror of losing your saves to corruption or just deleting something you shouldn’t have.
  4. jimmymcgoochie's post in landing gear INCREDIBLY bouncy was marked as the answer   
    Might be an issue with your landing gear suspension. Enable advanced tweakables, override the spring/damper settings and turn spring strength down on the wheels that are jumping.
  5. jimmymcgoochie's post in Really pinpoint landings was marked as the answer   
    Vertical construction while landed is a tricky thing to do, but not impossible- you'll need a lot of fuel to counter gravity and full RCS control for translation and the bigger the craft the more difficult it will be.
    If you can land on the Mun, you can hover over the surface. Point radial out from the probe core (you could try radial in using the docking port on the underside but that could get confusing very quickly) and apply just enough throttle that you hover at a steady altitude. Set your RCS thrusters to only fire for translation and not rotation (pitch/roll/yaw) by disabling those in the actuation toggles- I believe you need advanced tweakables enabled to have that option- and move carefully across the surface until you're hovering right on top of your target, then throttle down slightly and drop on top of the docking port. For a small probe it should be fairly easy; for a large base module or something similar it'll be a lot harder to do as your controls will be a lot more sluggish and you'll need a lot more fuel (and probably some proper engines too).
    Or you could try making a crane?
  6. jimmymcgoochie's post in Really pinpoint landings was marked as the answer   
    Vertical construction while landed is a tricky thing to do, but not impossible- you'll need a lot of fuel to counter gravity and full RCS control for translation and the bigger the craft the more difficult it will be.
    If you can land on the Mun, you can hover over the surface. Point radial out from the probe core (you could try radial in using the docking port on the underside but that could get confusing very quickly) and apply just enough throttle that you hover at a steady altitude. Set your RCS thrusters to only fire for translation and not rotation (pitch/roll/yaw) by disabling those in the actuation toggles- I believe you need advanced tweakables enabled to have that option- and move carefully across the surface until you're hovering right on top of your target, then throttle down slightly and drop on top of the docking port. For a small probe it should be fairly easy; for a large base module or something similar it'll be a lot harder to do as your controls will be a lot more sluggish and you'll need a lot more fuel (and probably some proper engines too).
    Or you could try making a crane?
  7. jimmymcgoochie's post in Really pinpoint landings was marked as the answer   
    Vertical construction while landed is a tricky thing to do, but not impossible- you'll need a lot of fuel to counter gravity and full RCS control for translation and the bigger the craft the more difficult it will be.
    If you can land on the Mun, you can hover over the surface. Point radial out from the probe core (you could try radial in using the docking port on the underside but that could get confusing very quickly) and apply just enough throttle that you hover at a steady altitude. Set your RCS thrusters to only fire for translation and not rotation (pitch/roll/yaw) by disabling those in the actuation toggles- I believe you need advanced tweakables enabled to have that option- and move carefully across the surface until you're hovering right on top of your target, then throttle down slightly and drop on top of the docking port. For a small probe it should be fairly easy; for a large base module or something similar it'll be a lot harder to do as your controls will be a lot more sluggish and you'll need a lot more fuel (and probably some proper engines too).
    Or you could try making a crane?
  8. jimmymcgoochie's post in How do I get RSS and RO on KSP - 1.12.2 ? was marked as the answer   
    Short answer, you don’t.
    Longer answer: Realism Overhaul and all the related mods aren’t updated past KSP 1.10, using them in a later version can cause unexpected problems (I know, I’ve been running RO and RP-1 in KSP 1.11 for a while now and it’s not something I’d recommend). You can easily downgrade your KSP version to 1.10.1 and use that for all your Realism needs, the additional game features from 1.11 and 1.12 aren’t that useful in RO/RP-1 and in many cases are a hindrance rather than a help- variable RCS thrusters and separate EVA jetpacks are just two of the problems I’ve had to deal with while running in 1.11(.1).
    If you’re new to KSP, I suggest trying a slightly upscaled solar system first before going up to RSS- some are made to be bigger (e.g. JNSQ which is 2.7x stock size) and many others can be rescaled using Sigma Dimensions and Rescale; there’s also quarter and half scale RSS, though they seem to be quite old and haven’t been updated in a while. Jumping straight from stock scale to RSS is a massive adjustment, but getting used to an intermediate scale system eases the transition a lot. Most stock parts and stock-balanced mods are balanced for a ~2.5x scaled system (I’ve heard it said that the original plan was to have the 3-Kerbal pod being 1 metre in diameter, but technical difficulties doing that meant they had to make it 2.5x larger and that might be why) so this scale is generally seen as the best one for stock parts.
  9. jimmymcgoochie's post in Lots of crafts in orbit was marked as the answer   
    Take a look at those 337 craft and think- what do you absolutely definitely need? Then delete everything else.
    Spent boosters? Delete them. Old probes and relays that have been replaced by newer models with better tech? Delete them. Junky space stations that were launched for contracts? You could delete those, or you could try bringing them back down to the surface and recovering them for a refund, stations tend to be more valuable than other crafts. Got old landers or rovers elsewhere that have served their purpose? Yup, delete those too.
    Keeping more than 50 craft on the go at once is likely to start creating performance problems even on a good PC, so try to design your launch rockets so they either run out of fuel while suborbital (periapsis <20km so they get auto-deleted) or with enough fuel and a control point (probe core) that they can deorbit themselves once they put the payload into orbit.
  10. jimmymcgoochie's post in Hello, I'm having trouble getting to a low Kerbol orbit, can anybody help? was marked as the answer   
    Make your probe as small and more importantly as light as possible. It might seem like you should cram as much fuel as possible on there, but the delta-V gains on that stage are often marginal and the extra weight will reduce the delta-V of your other stages and could end up reducing your total delta-V. You should also keep an eye on your TWR as a low TWR increases burn duration which can lead to cosine losses (due to burning in a direction that isn’t directly prograde/retrograde) that waste delta-V. After a lot of experimenting, I’ve found that if you want a payload mass below 7 tons (probe plus propulsion) or the cheapest mission possible, it’s better to use the Terrier than the NERV as you get more delta-V that way; however above 7 tons the NERV’s vastly higher ISP finally outweighs its much higher mass and you’ll get more delta-V from it than the Terrier. Both have the same thrust, the Terrier has a gimbal (so you need less powerful reaction wheels to keep it pointing the right way)  but the NERV has an alternator (can generate power when burning) but the NERV is much more expensive (10k funds versus under 400 for the Terrier) and is much further along the tech tree.  Work smart, not hard- burning retrograde at a very high apoapsis (somewhere beyond Jool’s orbit at least) is a lot more effective at reducing your periapsis because the orbital velocity out there is a lot less- removing 100m/s when you’re going at 1000m/s makes a lot more difference than when you’re going 10,000m/s. You could also try using a Jool gravity assist to lower your periapsis, getting some ‘free’ trajectory adjustment at the cost of requiring a pretty precise flyby to eject you solar retrograde from Jool’s SOI. edit: it turns out you can crash into the sun very easily with about 4km/s of delta-V in LKO- burn prograde until your apoapsis is at Jool's orbit, then when you reach apoapsis point retrograde and burn until your periapsis hits the sun- you can easily reverse your orbit and go solar retrograde this way.
  11. jimmymcgoochie's post in OPT was marked as the answer   
    That looks like a pretty serious issue, but we’ll need the full logs to try and diagnose the cause. Here’s how you find them:
    Did you by any chance download KSP through Steam, and then install mods into that Steam-controlled copy of KSP?
  12. jimmymcgoochie's post in Kerbal can't climb back into Kerbal X capsule was marked as the answer   
    That's just because KSP 1.11 added a feature to stop Kerbals climbing off the end of a ladder; I don't understand why this was added as it seems to be more of a hindrance than a help. You can disable that in the game settings, or just jetpack up to the hatch instead.
  13. jimmymcgoochie's post in Kerbal can't climb back into Kerbal X capsule was marked as the answer   
    That's just because KSP 1.11 added a feature to stop Kerbals climbing off the end of a ladder; I don't understand why this was added as it seems to be more of a hindrance than a help. You can disable that in the game settings, or just jetpack up to the hatch instead.
  14. jimmymcgoochie's post in KSP keeps crashing every time I try to launch the game was marked as the answer   
    Verify the files through Steam- right click KSP > Properties > local files > verify integrity of game files. The logs look OK to me, no exceptions thrown, but a few errors for custom flags early in the loading process so I'd take a look at those and consider removing them to see if that fixes things.
  15. jimmymcgoochie's post in In the Kerbalisim mod what does turning on lifetime radiation do? was marked as the answer   
    With lifetime radiation turned on, if Jeb goes up and gets 50% radiation exposure on a mission before landing on Kerbin and recovering him, he'll start the next mission at 50% radiation; with lifetime radiation turned off, he'll start at 0%. I assume that the lifetime radiation on setting is for more "realistic" gameplay, and would probably suit those who don't want to use the "magic" active shield and the radiation detox unit in the Hitchhiker, both of which substantially reduce radiation exposure on long voyages.
    Either way, radiation is the single biggest threat to any crew with Kerbalism installed, but a few little tricks can make a really big difference:
    Make the propulsion section of your interplanetary ship (the engines and fuel tanks) at least one size bigger than the crew section- so if you're using Hitchhikers and MPLs for your crew, make the fuel tanks at least 3.75m wide- and point the engines straight at the sun; the fuel tanks will act as very effective radiation shielding, completely blocking solar radiation as long as the crew modules are completely concealed by it. This is the only way to survive frequent solar storms. Shielding is averaged across the entire ship so having one module heavily shielded as a radiation shelter doesn't actually work; divide it up evenly or according to weight distribution or ease of launch/construction if you like. Passive shielding is heavy but effective against high radiation levels, active shields work better against background radiation and require power to operate but are a bit lighter. For going to Duna, a couple of active shields and pointing away from the sun will be enough to prevent any radiation exposure at all, but it's always a good idea to have some passive shielding in case your active shields fail or you blunder into a planetary radiation belt. The radiation detox unit (RDU) is an upgrade for the Hitchhiker that can actively heal your crew's radiation exposure, using oxygen and power to do so. It's unlocked late in the tech tree and is very slow, so don't rely on it as your only means of defence against radiation exposure; it can only work for one crew member at a time per Hitchhiker too and uses quite a lot of power, but it can make the difference between life and death. Do not- repeat DO NOT- try and gravity assist your way into Jool orbit. Just don't. Jool's radiation belts are insanely powerful and the outer belt will kill you in mere days even with maximum radiation shielding on every module; the inner belt will fry you in mere minutes.
  16. jimmymcgoochie's post in Excessive planet glow ? (RSS/StockVisualEnhancements) was marked as the answer   
    There’s your answer. Try using RSSVE, or EVO if your PC is up to the task:
    https://github.com/KSP-RO/RSSVE
    or
     
  17. jimmymcgoochie's post in Excessive planet glow ? (RSS/StockVisualEnhancements) was marked as the answer   
    There’s your answer. Try using RSSVE, or EVO if your PC is up to the task:
    https://github.com/KSP-RO/RSSVE
    or
     
  18. jimmymcgoochie's post in Excessive planet glow ? (RSS/StockVisualEnhancements) was marked as the answer   
    There’s your answer. Try using RSSVE, or EVO if your PC is up to the task:
    https://github.com/KSP-RO/RSSVE
    or
     
  19. jimmymcgoochie's post in Help! A weird overlay is on my screen! was marked as the answer   
    I’ve had the same thing happen to me, it made landing on Laythe rather tricky when I could barely tell which was the real plane and which was the glitch.
    Try rolling back to the second newest version of scatterer, the latest version seems a bit buggy and downgrading might solve the problem.
  20. jimmymcgoochie's post in Can deployed science experiments be picked up again after deployment? was marked as the answer   
    Yes, you can pick them up- just right click them then click "pick up". You can only do this if the Kerbal you are controlling has the room in their inventory- they need a space for it to go and the volume/mass for it to fit. If you pick it up when it's half way through an experiment, for example because you've levelled up a scientist and can get a faster data collection rate, it doesn't mean you'll get more than the maximum science cap- if the experiment produces 100 science in total and you've transmitted 40%, picking up and re-deploying will probably generate another 100% data but you'll only get another 60 science points for it.
    The data needs to be transmitted back to be received, so packing a deployed dish can be useful for more distant targets; it's fairly powerful, but if you're going further than Duna you'll probably need relays to boost the signal back to Kerbin. There's nothing to stop you from landing a probe beside the deployed science setup with a big relay dish though, just bear in mind that you still need an unblocked line of sight to Kerbin so there'll be times when you can't send data back- relays will fix that as they do for any other mission.
  21. jimmymcgoochie's post in all parts missing (solved) was marked as the answer   
    Here's one possible cause: you're putting mods in the KSP controlled by Steam. This is A BAD IDEA. Steam interferes a lot, deleting stuff that it thinks shouldn't be there- including when you add mods. The great thing about KSP is that you can copy it as many times as you like, have multiple copies on different versions of the game with different mods in each, so you can easily avoid this problem.
    Try the following:
    Copy your save game (KSP/saves/your save name) and keep that somewhere else- desktop would do; Completely uninstall KSP through Steam, delete everything; Reinstall KSP through Steam, then verify the game files (right-click KSP > Properties > Local Files > verify files); Run KSP to make sure everything shows up as expected; Assuming it works properly, copy the entire KSP folder out of steamapps/common and paste it somewhere else outside of Steam's control- again desktop would do; Install the mods into that new copy, where Steam can't mess them up, and copy your save game into it too. Keep the Steam version of KSP completely stock, no mods whatsoever, so it can collect game version updates when they are released, while your copies with mods don't get updates that could break mod compatibility.
  22. jimmymcgoochie's post in Astronomers Visual Pack not working. was marked as the answer   
    That folder structure is wrong.
    First of all, you have a GameData inside your GameData which is wrong- if a mod provides a GameData folder, you need to put the contents of that into your KSP GameData folder (or merge the two GameData folders when looking at the root KSP directory).
    Secondly, AvP.v4.1 isn't right either, that looks like you've downloaded AVP v4.1 from e.g. curseforge and then dumped the download straight into GameData. You should always check the contents of your downloads and put the right folders into KSP/GameData or it won't work. I suspect if you open that folder up you'll find either a GameData folder, or one called AVP and possibly ModuleManager too; put those into KSP/GameData and delete the unnecessary folders. Likewise for Parallax.1.2.3 and scatterer.0.0.0723
    Third, you don't need BoulderCo- that's the default EVE config and will conflict with AVP's configs once you have them installed correctly.
    To install AVP in KSP 1.11.2 through CKAN, click Settings > Compatible KSP Versions and then select everything from 1.8 to 1.11, you should then be able to install AVP using CKAN- but first you'll need to delete the EVE, AVP, scatterer and module manager you have in there already. You can also install Parallax, DOE, waterfall and more this way.
  23. jimmymcgoochie's post in Do Relay Satellites Need Power to Relay Science ? was marked as the answer   
    No, you don’t need to worry about powering the relays and the transmission speed of their relay dishes isn’t a factor either (some mods change this, but stock KSP doesn’t care). I think the only thing that matters is signal strength as reduced signal means less science from your transmissions, but I don’t know if that’s actually true or not.
  24. jimmymcgoochie's post in Do Relay Satellites Need Power to Relay Science ? was marked as the answer   
    No, you don’t need to worry about powering the relays and the transmission speed of their relay dishes isn’t a factor either (some mods change this, but stock KSP doesn’t care). I think the only thing that matters is signal strength as reduced signal means less science from your transmissions, but I don’t know if that’s actually true or not.
  25. jimmymcgoochie's post in Rover blocked on Mun was marked as the answer   
    Does that satellite have a relay dish on it, or just a normal antenna? As the names suggest, direct type antennae can only transmit a signal to something else- Kerbin or another craft- but relay dishes can also receive a signal from another craft and then forward it on. Orbiting the Mun, a relay with a few HG-5 deployable dishes would be sufficient, but further out you’ll need the RA-class fixed dishes.
    A good relay network will not only prevent loss of signal and loss of control but also means your individual rovers, landers etc. only need small direct antennae to reach the relays above, rather than carrying a big, heavy one to communicate all the way back to Kerbin. I suggest you build a simple relay with either a few HG-5s or a single RA-2 and put several of those in orbit around the Mun (and Minmus too) to ensure that you get complete coverage of the surface: put them in sets of 3 in a high polar orbit, regularly spaced, so they can communicate with each other and will cover almost every part of the Mun/Minmus’ surface.
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