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krashkart

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Posts posted by krashkart

  1. when i try to open parachute calculator it says it isn't a proper win32 application :/

    cziken20, this might help you out in the meantime:

    Straight up, the equation is this:

    d = √(8 * m * g / (Pi * v² * Cd * 1.223 * p * c))

    where:

    d is the diameter each parachute you will use will need to be (m)

    m is the total mass of your craft (kg)

    g is the gravitational acceleration of the planet (m/s²)

    v² is your wanted landing speed squared (m/s)

    Cd is the drag coefficient of the material you are using

    p is atmospheric pressure where you are landing (atm)

    c is the number of chutes you will be using

    So for example, landing a 4.5t mk1-2 pod with a parachute at 6m/s on Kerbin with three nylon parachutes would give this:

    d = √(8 * 4500 * 9.81 / (Pi * 6² * 1 * 1.223 * 1 * 3)) ~ 29.1m That would mean each parachute would have a diameter of about 30m :)

  2. Straight up, the equation is this:

    d = √(8 * m * g / (Pi * v² * Cd * 1.223 * p * c))

    where:

    d is the diameter each parachute you will use will need to be (m)

    m is the total mass of your craft (kg)

    g is the gravitational acceleration of the planet (m/s²)

    v² is your wanted landing speed squared (m/s)

    Cd is the drag coefficient of the material you are using

    p is atmospheric pressure where you are landing (atm)

    c is the number of chutes you will be using

    So for example, landing a 4.5t mk1-2 pod with a parachute at 6m/s on Kerbin with three nylon parachutes would give this:

    d = √(8 * 4500 * 9.81 / (Pi * 6² * 1 * 1.223 * 1 * 3)) ~ 29.1m That would mean each parachute would have a diameter of about 30m :)

    Thank you! :)

  3. I've been using the interstage adapters to change how my rockets look by covering up the stock fuel tanks. I was trying to make something Juno-1-esque here. Dwhgr3Cl.png?1 Everything's covered in fairings except the payload. What's nice about this is that you can get other sizes apart from the standard 0.625, 1.25, 2.5 metres.
    Nice! I'm inspired to fiddle around with the interstages and see what I can come up with. :) Edit: Does anyone else get a little bit of lag when they use these fairings? I seemed to get a little bit after I added an interstage/fairings under the second stage of one of my rockets. It's no big deal, just wondering.
  4. It does fit 2.5m parts, but it looks best on 5m parts. Very well done, btw. Looks beautiful and still runs great on this outdated workhorse computer. I rarely put anything into orbit that weighs more than 15-20 tons, and after running a couple of quick test flights earlier today I think the F-1 may be able to power an SSTO capable of lifting same. Will have to do some more testing once I reinstall the 5m LFTs from whichever addon they are in. :D

  5. Oh sweet Gemini, at long last I have found you!

    A simple upgrade of KSP and an updated Novapunch, was all it took to steal you away from me.

    For months I was lost, and my heart so wept for thee... ;.;

    Uh... something something........ lalala doo-bee-doo wah-waah? :blush:

    Thank you, frizzank. Glad to see that Gemini is still alive and kicking. :)

  6. Put all the satellites you're going to release on the same vehicle. Then you have two options: give each satellite propulsion individually, or use only the main vehicle and give it extra fuel.

    If you take the first approach, but your vehicle in an orbit with an orbital period that is a fraction of the orbit you want. Your apoapsis should be at geosynchronous altitude. For example, a geosynchronous orbit has an orbital period of 6 hours. If you get into an orbit of 2/3rds that (4 hours), you'll move 1/3rds of a geosynchronous orbit ahead every full orbit you make. Release one satellite at your apoapsis and have it burn prograde until its in a geosynchronous orbit. Wait for the transport vehicle to make a full orbit, then have it release another satellite, and have that satellite burn until it reaches geosynchronous orbit. It should be precisely 1/3rds of an orbit away from the previous satellite. Do the same thing for the last satellite. Use Kerbal Engineer to be able to see your orbital period; you can fine-tune it to a margin of error of about 0.4 seconds.

    The second approach is similar to the first. But first you go to into an a geosynchronous altitude and release satellite number #1. Then your transport vehicle goes into the 2/3rds orbit, makes a full orbit, and burns to get back into a geosynchronous orbit, where it releases the second satellite. Repeat for the third satellite. This means you don't have to add any propulsion to the individual satellites, but you'll have to bring more fuel.

    Thank you for your help, Kimberly. Much appreciated. :)

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