Steel

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About Steel

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  1. Steel

    Orbex thread

    One thing I will say is that it's so good to finally see opportunities like this spring up somewhere other than the US.
  2. For those who might be interested, ESA have just launched the second year of the "Space Explorations Masters" Challenge [1]. This is essentially an idea generator competition whereby you can submit you ideas to solve key problems in the space industry for a chance to have funding and collaboration opportunities with big industrial players in the sector. Seems like an interesting opportunity for any of you who might have some creative ideas lurking in the back of your mind. [1] http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Human_Spaceflight/Be_the_next_Space_Exploration_Master
  3. Electron degeracy pressure is a quantum effect as a result of the Pauli exclusion principal, rather than a fundamental force.
  4. Mass accretion which pushes the mass of a white dwarf over the Chandrasekhar limit. At this point the electron degeneracy pressure can no longer balance against gravity and it collapses.
  5. Depends on the type of supernova. The mechanisms that trigger then aren't that well understood, but they generally form from white dwarves or massive stars.
  6. Radiation pressure [1] in normal stars, or electron degeracy pressure [2] in white dwarves. [1] https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radiation_pressure [2] https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electron_degeneracy_pressure
  7. "Approximately 26 inches tall and roughly estimated to be around 1700 pieces. Designed to match the scale and asthetic quality of the Saturn V."
  8. Steel

    Hohmann Transfer

    Yes, that constant is actually dependent on the mass of the central body
  9. Steel

    SpaceX Discussion Thread

    I think we all already knew, but I guess Mr/Mrs J. Average member of the public has heard no official announcement on the subject from SpaceX since they announced they were going to do it.
  10. Steel

    NASA SLS/Orion/Payloads

    Well no, they'll just need to validate the heatshield again. I would imagine that the reentry data they collected on that flight will also have helped them make this change. This is a late program change no doubt, but ETF-1 will still have produced a wealth of data on all other aspects of the spaecraft
  11. I don't know if anyone has mentioned this yet, but I think everyone should read the excellent waitbutwhy article on AI from a couple of years back. It's a 2-parter and quite lengthy, but more than worth the time to read. Really thought provoking, certainly gave me (an AI advocate) reason to pause and think about some of the implications and dangers that many people seem to dismiss quite quickly.
  12. Steel

    Elon Musk and the NTSB

    Yes, but these improve survivability of a crash, they have absolutely no effect on how likely a crash is to happen to the vehicle That (I think) is the distinction @YNM was trying to draw. Manufacturers focus of safety features because that sell cars and improve drivability, however the chance that an accident happens to any given car is much more dependent on external factors. Therefore, it's a little silly to say that Teslas are safe based on their crashes per millions km, because that's mainly due to factors other than the car.
  13. You're quite right... Clearly my particle physics is a little rusty
  14. We actually understand the properties of antimatter quite well - it's surprisingly easy to find, it just doesn't stick around very long, but if you know where to look you can study it's properties. It obeys the laws of gravity the same as regular matter
  15. To quote Wikipedia (don't worry, I did check its source on this) "Antimatter may exist in relatively large amounts in far-away galaxies due to cosmic inflation in the primordial time of the universe. Antimatter galaxies, if they exist, are expected to have the same chemistry and absorption and emission spectra as normal-matter galaxies, and their astronomical objectswould be observationally identical, making them difficult to distinguish" This result just seems to add strength to that line of reasoning.