pxi

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About pxi

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    Junior Rocket Scientist
  1. Retro Gaming and Emulators

    It's at this point you'd have to be a copyright lawyer to answer that, but I was under the impression that what you're referring to actually involves trademarks, not copyright.
  2. Retro Gaming and Emulators

    By rip i presume you mean download? Outside of cases where the rights holders have actually given permission for their stuff to be distributed (which has happened fairly frequently as some of the 'abandonware' groups have made considerable efforts to clear things in this regard) I really don't think this is the case. Copyright doesn't expire just because someone is not profiting off of something. And let's not pretend in an era of ebay and a healthy second-hand sales market that it's impossible to buy many of these games, it's more an issue that the rights-holder will not see any of that money.
  3. Retro Gaming and Emulators

    Agreed, depending on the console some of it can be done with as little as your standard cd/dvd drive. On the cart end, there are also options like the Retron 5 which allegedly can be modified to perform that function as well. edit: And even outside of the legality of the process, from a software preservation point of view there is good reason to encourage as many people to do it as possible, there are still previously-unknown revisions of games popping up regularly, and a huge swathe of games that have been dumped incorrectly. I've come across five Wii European titles in my collection that are listed as missing in the redump databases in the short time that I've been looking into it.
  4. Retro Gaming and Emulators

    Let's say N64 emulation in general is 'reasonable'. I personally find it good enough for the most part, others would disagree. The main issue imo is trying to replicate the N64's gamepad layout on a common (think xbox) controller - there's simply no way I've found to map those buttons in a way that feels good. The common consensus seems to be to map the yellow buttons to the right analog stick, but that really feels off to me, but it does seem to be the way a lot of people do it. How much this affects you will greatly depend on the game though. As an aside, you may run into claims about Project 64 containing malware. There was a kernel of truth to this at one point - the installer was bundled with adware once upon a time, but this is no longer the case. You will however start to notice a nag screen asking you to register the program after running it a few times. This is easily sorted by editing the configuration file, looking for a line that says 'run count' (or words to that effect) and setting the value to -1. The legality is reasonably straightforward. (Standard IANAL disclaimer applies.) Emulation in principle and individual emulators themselves are legal. This was established with the Sony vs Bleem lawsuit back in the 90's. Downloading stuff off the internet and using it on an emulator is not. There is no if and or but with that. It doesn't matter if you own the cart, you are not making a backup by downloading stuff off the internet. If you do own the cart or disk etc, you need to dump it yourself, which requires you to possess the means to do that, be it a rom dumper, modified console or whatever. There is no shortcut to this.
  5. Small point of order here: literally 99% of the sites where you'll find SNES (and other) roms are warez sites in all but the name. The reason you won't find Nintendo first-party games on a lot of them is that Nintendo occasionally (as happened recently) goes on a copyright takedown spree. Very little of what is available is true abandonware, you will find that for example SEGA still sell a huge amount of their back-catalogue through Steam, as well as other distribution methods like the virtual console. The same is true for a large amount of the Neo Geo and Atari librarys. Individual publishers like Namco and Taito frequently publish anthologies of their older games as well. You will find all of this freely available if you spend even a small amount of time looking online. The difference is that in general Nintendo seem to be the company most interested in actually enforcing their copyright.
  6. 2 Different Graphics Cards in One Computer

    You might want to have a look at this thread a quick web search threw up: https://forums.evga.com/GTX-780-and-Ti-for-SLI-m2153776.aspx The tl;dr is that the two cards likely wouldn't work in a SLI configuration (which is what I presume you mean by a bridge) unless they're of the same DEV number. As for DirextX12, I can't speak to that as I really don't know the ins and outs of it, but if it does allow you to use 2 different graphics cards outside of SLI, you'd still be limited to games that use DirectX12. Also you include cost of installation. You are aware that you'd be paying $40 to have someone unscrew a couple of screws, take the side off your computer, plug the card in, and re-assemble? Not my place to tell you how to spend your money, but it's a process that's easily doable by the end-user imo.
  7. Thread to complain bout stuff

    Wouldn't disagree with that either.
  8. Arcade Stuff

    Ok I'll grant you that. The question though is whether internally on the board Asteroids is actually rolling the score variable back to zero when the million hundred-thousand point threshold is passed. My suspicion would be that the score continues to increment, but the display is only showing the last six five digits. Consider my reasoning. 1 million 100,000 is not a significant number in computing like say 256 or 65536. There is no reason for the number to overflow because you are hitting a bit-length limit. For all intents and purposes, yes you can probably consider it to be an overflow condition, but I really doubt it has anything to do with the limitations of 8-bit programming.
  9. Arcade Stuff

    The high score wrapping back to 000000 when you hit a million points isn't a case of integer overflow afaik. An 8-bit number covers from 0-255. What you're seeing there is a case where they simply didn't include enough digits to show the score, likely because at the time such scores were thought to be impossible. You are correct about the Pac-Man Kill Screen though. Other examples of this can be seen in Donkey Kong, Galaga and Dig Dug.
  10. Arcade Stuff

    You need one (or more) of these: Model shown (Hori RAP V3-SA) is the one I have (actually I have 2, and I'm still kind of kicking myself that I didn't buy the other two that the local Gamestop were selling off cheap @ €40 each) all Sanwa parts internally which is what you'll find in the majority of Japanese cabs. For fighting games they do take a little getting used to when you're used to gamepads, but once you get it, there's no going back.
  11. Arcade Stuff

    There's plenty of copies uploaded to youtube, likely you can find one that isn't blocked. It's not a 100% accurate retelling of events from what I gather - some of the footage was edited in such a way as to ham up the antagonism between Steve Wiebe and Billy Mitchell - but it's an interesting glimpse into the culture nonetheless.
  12. Arcade Stuff

    Given that we're discussing Arcade Games, games arcades, high scores and the like, it occurred to me that some might be interested in the documentary "The King of Kong".
  13. Arcade Stuff

    umm... http://store.steampowered.com/app/465780/New_Retro_Arcade_Neon/
  14. Arcade Stuff

    I'm old enough to remember when arcades were actually arcades, and not 90% claw machines and coin pushers. It was rare that I had the cash to spend any significant time in them though. I don't really have the space for one but I'd love to get hold of a Capcom Z-back cabinet - basically the iconic Street Fighter 2 style cabinet for anyone that doesn't know - good looking and designed for day-to-day operation, board swapping etc. to be performed from the front. It's nice to see that barcades are now beginning to fill the gap left by traditional arcades, the overwhelming majority of the games are easilly available for play in various forms, but the cabinets themselves are pieces of computing history that needs preserving. People like John Jacobsen (http://www.youtube.com/user/blkdog7) are doing sterling work in that regard.
  15. Just got term'd on Roblox.

    From what I gather, he got banned from Roblox. This is made worse because as far as I can ascertain, his account had some sort of lifetime perk applied to it which seems to have been rather costly to get. All in all it's a lesson in why they don't hand the nuclear codes over to anyone who just wants to take a selfie with them.