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Found 36 results

  1. Sorry if this question was posted before, couldnt find anything like this. I love Kerbalism, the real time simulation that calculates every ships resources, food, oxygen in the background. But I just cant play without RemoteTech. So my question: Is there anything I can do to make a system that work like the combination of the two mods above?
  2. Please can some one tell me what is wrong with this Stations please? And yes l did put them into RemoteTech Settings.cfg. Please tell me what is wrong with this.
  3. Hi all, I am really loving my career play-through this time through using remoteTech. I am running 63 mods currently, and the ones that apply to my questions are RemoteTech, Community Tech Tree, RealChute and Tantares, I believe. I set up 3 short range Sats at 2848400m for keosynchronous orbits. They each had an L-LG1 Low Gain antenna for their Omni range (4mm), and 3 Reflectron KR-7s (90mm) for transmission. It is my understanding, that the omnis should pick up the signal from the KSC, and the cone antennas will send the signal further. I aimed them each at the Mun, Minmus, and the Active Vessel. I then set up Sats around Mun and Minmus, with a single 4mm Omni, four 90mm cone antennas, and four 25mm cone antennas. The idea was, aim one 90mm each at the SR ComSats around Kerbin, one each for active vessel, and the 25mm's for aiming at each other (the other sats around Mun and Minmus, respectively). These were all set up in 500k orbits, polar and equatorial. Now, here is where I need advice: Are those designs sound? Are the orbits I chose, the right choice? Did I over or under engineer them? I ask, because when I send Scansats out, I still need three cone antennas in order to not lose connection, I can't get away with just omni's. I can send out flyby satellites with just omnis, but I tend to lose connection mid flight, and I ALWAYS lose connection before I can deploy chutes on my return to Kerbin, but Real Chute keeps my probes from dying. I have watched the "Remote Tech School" YouTube series by Grunfworks, but, I think I missed something. Does anyone have any advice? Thank you.
  4. Hi all, I am really loving my career play-through this time through using remoteTech. I am running 63 mods currently, and the ones that apply to my questions are RemoteTech, Community Tech Tree, RealChute and Tantares, I believe. I set up 3 short range Sats at 2848400m for keosynchronous orbits. They each had an L-LG1 Low Gain antenna for their Omni range (4mm), and 3 Reflectron KR-7s (90mm) for transmission. It is my understanding, that the omnis should pick up the signal from the KSC, and the cone antennas will send the signal further. I aimed them each at the Mun, Minmus, and the Active Vessel. I then set up Sats around Mun and Minmus, with a single 4mm Omni, four 90mm cone antennas, and four 25mm cone antennas. The idea was, aim one 90mm each at the SR ComSats around Kerbin, one each for active vessel, and the 25mm's for aiming at each other (the other sats around Mun and Minmus, respectively). These were all set up in 500k orbits, polar and equatorial. Now, here is where I need advice: Are those designs sound? Are the orbits I chose, the right choice? Did I over or under engineer them? I ask, because when I send Scansats out, I still need three cone antennas in order to not lose connection, I can't get away with just omni's. I can send out flyby satellites with just omnis, but I tend to lose connection mid flight, and I ALWAYS lose connection before I can deploy chutes on my return to Kerbin, but Real Chute keeps my probes from dying. I have watched the "Remote Tech School" YouTube series by Grunfworks, but, I think I missed something. Does anyone have any advice? Thank you.
  5. So I've got Remote Tech 1.6.9 installed and almost none of it shows up. I get the red dot for KSC, the four buttons in the corner of the map screen, and the added contracts but nothing else. No extra antennae, no signal connection lines, and no target cones. I've tried re-installing and removing all other mods but nothing seems to be working.
  6. Has anyone ever done a mission around the kerbin system using TAC, remote tech, Dangit and the parts available from Vens' stock revamp? I'm trying to think of spacecraft designs that would work and if anyone has already done so, could you be so kind as to share how you did it? Even missions to any other planet like Laythe, or Eeloo would be great. I'm also planning on using the parts from nuclear propulsion pulse rockets mod (Orion and Medusa) but haven't gotten around to using them yet. Here is a pic of my Interplanetary craft that I am currently using to push crew and cargo to their destinations, she just had her shakedown mission to Mun, performed a landing mission, and returned her crew back home safely:
  7. So this is my current relay system: Black dots are sats with Omni antennas (the blue lines are the omni connections) Red dots are long range sats (DTS-M1) the red lines are the connections of the longe range dishes/antennas Black dots with a small red dot means there is an omni antenna and a long range antenna. Any tips for me for a better connection, I have trouble knowing which dish should target what. Here is my future planned relay system: the purple line is a new satellite system: The reason I made the new relay sats closer to kerbin is because I dont have any long range connection if you set Kerbin as target (please correct me if Im wrong). so does this look like any good?
  8. So, yet again I've been busy making relay systems around Kerbin and the Mün. This is my current situation: http://postimg.org/image/ygt4n4vhd/ Inner 4 satellites (Solidarity): Each have 1 Comm 16 (omni) (for low kerbin orbits) At 500 km Outer 3 satellites (Serenity): Each have 3 DTS-M1 (first dish): 1 pointed towards the next satellite in the link 1 pointed towards the previous satellite in the link 1 pointed to 'Current Vessel' At 2500 Km On to the Mün: http://postimg.org/image/rovbarb0f/ Inner 3 satellites (Orb of the Night): Each have a Comm 16 (covers to whole surface for landing) At 300 Km Outer 2 satellites (Day of Night): Each have 3 DTS-M1 and 1 Comm 16 1 DTS-M1 comm for every "Serenity" satellite though there is no link back it seems to work fine with connecting all the "Orb of the Night" satellites (is this because of the target on the "Current Vessel" at the "Serenity" satellites?) 1 Comm 16 for the "Orb of the Night" satellites At 500 Km So which Comms and how many do I need for an unmanned mission to the Mün? Also where should my dishes be pointed at on my Mün lander?
  9. How do I calculate the degrees my satellite will change in its orbit? For instance, let's say that I have a satellite at a perfect geostationary orbit. I want to set it up at 0o 0' 0" N 150o 0' 0" W. It is currently at 0o 0' 0" N 95o 0' 0" E. I know that a lower orbit travels faster, and it will take less time to go to 150o W if i get to a lower orbit than if i go to a higher one. I lower my perigee so the orbital period is 20 minute less than synchronous. How many degrees will I shift each orbit, relative to my starting point, and what is the formula used to calculate this?
  10. I run a heavily modded game (on Ubuntu Gnome 64bit), lots of part mods, RemoteTech, USI Life Support (USI-LS), KCT (Kerbal Construction Time). A partial list of the mods that I use can be found in the spoiler (there are a lot of mods that don't have version files). And the list of mods that have Parts directories. Good enough to start. I've been playing KSP long enough that I find early career mode boring, so I always give myself 15 million funds and 5000 science at the start so that I can upgrade most buildings and get moderately deep into the tech tree. That also means that I use MechJeb2 (MJ) for anything repetitive (that I've done a few dozen times) such as launches, rendevous, setting up transfers, and sometimes docking. As with all careers, the first contract is to launch a vessel. I load Jeb into a pod, strap him to a Flea, and off he goes! Now back to the normal career tactics. Since I use a life support mod (USI-LS), putting kerbals into orbit comes with maintenance cost of keeping them supplied and happy. So I prefer to go with unmanned vessels as much as possible at the start. When starting with RemoteTech in KSP 1.0.5, the first trick is to get your starting network up and running. There is even a contract pack (Contract Configurator addon) which rewards you for doing so. My preference is to put up four satellites with DTS-M1 (500km) and Comm-16 (2.5Mm) antennas around Kerbin at 451km (60 minutes). The second launch should happen just about when the first satellite passes overhead at 451km. Maybe a little bit afterwards. In general, when putting up those first satellites, I burn upwards at a steep angle (only 30-40 degrees off of vertical) until I get an Ap around 450km, then circularize at Ap. Later on, I worry about getting the four satellites spread out around the equator at 90 degree intervals. After that I focus on getting survey satellites into orbit around Kerbin (polar orbits), Mun and Minmus. These also serve as local communications satellites for those SOIs with DTS-M1 antennas linking between Kerbin-Mun and Kerbin-Minmus. Since I have both DMagic and SCANSat installed, I have lots of sensors that need to be deployed at various altitudes around the moons of Kerbin. One particular survey satellite is of note, and that is the one that holds both the Magnetometer Boom experiment and the RPWS (Radio and Plasma Wave Science) experiment. Both are from DMagic and you will get repeatable contracts for putting a satellite into a highly inclined (polar) orbit with a large eccentricity for a long period (tens of days). So for every moon / planet in the Kerbol system, you should plan on having a Mag/RPWS satellite in an polar elliptical orbit. Put them up, leave them there. When you get a new experiment to measure the magnetic field, you take one set of readings at high orbit and one at low orbit and transmit them back to start the timer. It makes for a source of easy money during your career.
  11. This has probably come up before; It's a fairly obvious use of the KSP UI, so I'm probably not the first one to stumble across it. But it provides a way to set up a simple, equidistant satellite array, using just the KSP User interface, without having to calculate orbital periods. As I understand it, the typical method for, say, spacing four satellites in a circular orbit is to do the following. Launch all four satellites on a single bus vehicle, reach the desired circular orbit, and circularize. Release the first Satellite. Based on the period of the original orbit, calculate the semimajor axis of a new orbit that has ¾ the period of the original orbit (5/4 also works, but we'll use ¾ for the example) and burn to put your bus in that orbit. Go around that orbit once. When you return to your starting point, recircularize. Assuming you used the ¾ period orbit, you will now be at a point 90° ahead of the original satellite. Release the second Satellite. Repeat steps 3 through 6 for the other two satellites, then head home. What we'll be doing here is eliminating any of the calculation of step 3: As long as your initial orbit is circular, you can use KSP's maneuver node and close-approach UI to evenly space out your satellites, without calculating delta-V, and without calculating the details of your phasing orbit. To do this, we have to come to realize two things; KSP's Close-approach markers are /always/ shown based on your presumed orbit after the last maneuver node on your path. By right-clicking on a Maneuver node, it will pop up a pair of buttons marked - and + that allow you to advance or retract a node one orbit at a time. What this allows us to do is the following: Deploy First Satellite and Target it. Create Node 1 to Roughly Estimate Phasing Orbit. Create Node 2 at 0.0 m/s for manipulating Closest Approach. Use Node 2 to Advance the Phasing Orbit. Fine-Tune Node 1 to refine the close-approach. Execute Node 1, Phase, and Recircularize. So here's an example, beginning to set up a four-satellite constellation using the above method. 1. Deploying the first Satellite Once the spacecraft reaches its target circular orbit, deploy the first satellite. It is then necessary to set the first satellite as a target in the KSP UI, so its close-approach markers can be used. 2. Create Maneuver Node 1 Create a maneuver node far enough in the future that you are comfortable manipulating it without catching up to it. I believe the one I've created here is about 10 minutes ahead of my spacecraft. Adjust the PRO and RETRO handles on the maneuver node to create a phasing orbit that has /approximately/ the phasing you want. It's fine if it's a rough approximation, because we're going to refine it later. 3. Create Maneuver Node 2 (0.0 m/s) Now create a second maneuver node further along the path of the phasing orbit. This maneuver node will have a 0.0 m/s value, and will be used to help refine Maneuver Node 1. 4. Use Maneuver Node 2 to advance the Closest Approach After placing Node 2, the Close-Approach Markers in the UI will show the closest approach after one orbit. Activate Node 2, then right-click on it to bring up the Orbit-advance buttons. (Upper-left image). Since we're doing 90° spacing, We'll want to click on the advance button three more times (Upper Right, Lower left, and Lower right) to show the spacing after four rounds of the phasing orbit. 5. Fine-Tune Node 1 to refine the Close Approach Now go back to Node 1 and adjust its Prograde and Retrograde handles to fine-tune the close approach. By doing this, we're adjusting the period of the phasing orbit to get it closer to ¾ the period of the target orbit. Once the markers match up, you're golden. 6. Execute Node 1 and Phase. Now you're ready. You can kill Node 2 now if you so desire; it's still at 0.0 m/s. Execute node 1 to enter the phasing orbit, go around once, and re-circularize when you reach the starting position. Once done, things look like this: The red and green lines solid lines are actually generated by the AntennaRange mod, here, they also serve to highlight the final positions of the Bus (where the green line crosses) and the fisrst satellite (where the red line crosses.). The bus is now 90° ahead of the target. You may now deploy Satellite 2, and repeat. And that's basically the method there. Note that I haven't checked the periapse or apoapse altitudes of the phasing orbits, everything was just done with the maneuver node UI. This method can similarly be used to space any number of satellites; If I'd needed to space five satellites, after placing Node 2, I'd crank it forward four more orbits in step 3. For Six, I'd need to crank Node 2 forward five more orbits, and so on. This method will also work if the phasing orbit is /larger/ than the target orbit; If I'd done the method above with a larger phasing orbit, I'd wind up putting the second satellite 90° behind the target. It also has its utility for Rendezvous; Make your orbit cross the target orbit. Place Node 1 where your orbit crosses the target orbit. Pull prograde or retrograde to spend as little delta-V as you feel comfortable using, and use node 2 to crank the intercept forward orbits until the close-approach markers are close enough, then go back to adjust Node 1's Prograde and Retrograde handles. Execute Node 1. On the orbit where Node 2 now exists, you'll have your close-approach. Hopefully, this has been helpful. Any questions?