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Found 12 results

  1. Hey all, I have been working behind the scenes a little bit with the help of @UomoCapra and a few others to create a Kerbal book series. Before officially announcing it and launching the series I wanted to put my little Kerbal feelers out to gauge interest and get any suggestions or ideas from forum users, specifically those of you who have discussed Kerbal stories or enjoyed the missions before (here's looking at you @STORMPILOTkerbalkind @million_lights @Just Jim @Rover 6428 ) The book series will be loosely based off of my (steam featured) Jeb's Life: A Kerbal Novel missions from Making History (you can find them here). The idea is that I will release a 20-40k word novella every 3-4 months complete with illustrations (think Diary of a Wimpy Kid, but with a few illustrations per chapter, not every page). Here's the catch-T2 is not looking to formally licence the IP to sell books, which means this is going to be a free fan-fiction project. I am a professional writer and have a publisher for my actual books who will help me with the editing and formatting. I plan on distributing the books here, on my website, and on social media as they are finished, hopefully in Epub format (which if any of you know is a universal digital format for easy reading). But they will need to be free and available to anyone and everyone. So unless there is quite a bit of interest, I can't justify starting the project. This will be a labor of love for KSP, and as such require my own time and money. I'm considering starting a Patreon page to help support the effort and allow me to have some breathing room when it comes to writing my actual Disparia novels. I'm also looking into producing actual printed copies of the book (again, for free) for those interested (though I'm still looking into whether or not I can do so). So before I jump in head first, I thought I would figuratively "Check my staging" for interest and suggestions. If anyone is interested in seeing this project proceed, please let me know (and for more info on my missions check those out, or see any of my past live streams or my actual, you know, books). I'm not posting links to that stuff here (because I don't know if I can). Safe to say you can find it if interested (or PM me). Cheers! ----------------------------------Here is an unedited glimpse at the first chapter if you're curious---------------------------------------------------- Chapter 1 The sky was most certainly blue—that overt fact had not escaped Jebbediah Kerman’s grasp. It was blue every day, unless it was raining or snowing. That it was blue was interesting. Why it was blue was more interesting. Try as he might, however, the eight-year-old Jeb could not find the answer. Every raised hand during his classroom studies was met with the same terse reply from Henrietta Able Kerman, Jeb’s second grade teacher: “Put your hand down and pay attention to the material!” Her voice grated and cracked on occasion, like a lifetime of hostility had broken her vocal chords but not her determination to see excitement in children doused and stomped into oblivion. So the answer to why it was blue would remain a mystery (at least for now). But that was fine. It wasn’t the blue sky that captivated young Jeb; it was the night sky. At night the blue vanished like a thin mist, like a curtain pulled away from the true sky. That sky was black. It was also shiny, colorful, active, and exciting. Every day during school Jeb would spend his time with his chin resting in his palms, his elbows on his desk, his eyes turned towards the window and up towards the sky. Sometimes it was sunny and the bright light of Kerbol would cause him to squint until his nose and brow were deeply furrowed. Sometimes it was cloudy and the abstract shapes would drift by, coalescing into imagined shapes, then pass quietly out of sight. Sometimes it would rain or snow and the deep layer of gray would block his view but not his imagination. There was much more to the world beyond the terrestrial one that he was familiar with. There had to be. Birds soared through the sky with ease, something no Kerbal had done before. Clouds drifted by seemingly weightless yet bound to a steady track through sky, guided along their invisible highway by an unseen hand. And what was beyond the mundane terrestrial world? Jeb didn’t know. Stars. Planets. Asteroids. Other floaty things. Astronomers and scientists had discovered, studied, catalogued, and reported on these objects for hundreds of years. Legends from dead civilizations mythologized the objects in the sky and incorporated them into their views and beliefs of the realms beyond daily reality. These objects were seen, studied, and incorporated into each culture. But they were not well understood. No Kerbal had left Kerbin’s surface for more than a few seconds, and when they had, it was usually because they fell off something and were quickly reminded that when you lose contact with the ground there is only one direction you can travel—down. But knowing that they were there and understanding what exactly they were besides transient lights and objects in an untouchable ether were two different things. And try as Jeb might, pushing his brain muscles with all his effort until sweat pooled in his green, furrowed brow, he could not learn more about them through sheer willpower. He could not… “Jebbediah Kaldrin Kerman!” Ms. Able shouted. “Get back in your seat this instant!” Jeb shook the cloud of imagined images from his eyes and focused on the reality around him. He was standing at the back window in his classroom looking out on the blue sky and the feet of the towering Origin Mountains. The window looked west towards the mountains where the late morning sun had fully bathed the green, gray, and white mountains in intense light. “Sorry Ms. Able,” Jeb replied. Though he said sorry, that his eyes remained focused outside suggested his words and feelings were in conflict. “What do you think you’re doing this time?” Ms. Able asked. A few birds, dark against the brightening sky, darted back and forth playing or chasing each other. Watching them, Jeb answered, “I’m watching the birds.” He said it matter-of-fact as though it was justification for not paying attention. “Jebbediah, come here.” Ms. Able, who had been standing by the chalkboard writing words that related somewhat to anatomy, slammed the chalk into the rail beneath the board, cracking it in three pieces. She puffed out her bulging and prodigious chest, adjusted her floral dress, and took two steps towards the front of the class. Jeb, lingering for just another moment, turned and walked down the center aisle between the separated rows of desks and stopped in front of his teacher. Jeb was only eight years old but already he (and most the other students) were eye level with their teacher. Ms. Able was, using only slightly exaggerated descriptions, as wide as she was tall. Her pale green complexion always glistened from a layer of sweat cause by the massive exertion everything seemed to be for her. She wore only dresses out of necessity. The dresses were so large and required so much fabric it was a wonder there were any sheets or pillow cases to be found inside the city of Granite Heights, the city of 5,000 people in which Jeb lived. As Jeb neared the hulking mass of Ms. Able the sour smell of old dairy, her distinct aroma, met Jeb’s sensitive nose. He scrunched his nose up reflexively to keep any air from passing through his nostrils. “Yef Miv Abuh?” Jeb said, the words coming out stifled due to lack of airflow. “Stand in front of the chalk board,” She ordered. Jeb walked around his teacher and stood where commanded. “Flap your arms like a bird.” Jeb raised his arms obediently and was about to flap, but hesitated. “Flap my arms?” He was far enough away from the diaboloical smell of his teacher that he could breathe (and speak) normally. “Flap them!” Her grating voice raised a few octaves and her green face turned a bit brown as she blushed from the effort. Jeb nodded, his eyes opening wide. He began flapping his arms quickly up and down. After a few moments his face began reddening and he panted from the effort. The harder he worked the more the kids in his class began to giggle. By the time a bit of sweat began forming under his brow the giggles had evolved into outright laughter. “Enough!” Ms. Able shouted and at once Jeb stopped flapping and the children went quiet. “Did your feet leave the ground?” Jeb looked down at his feet, lifting one off the ground and inspecting the sole of his brown school-issued boots. They revealed nothing. “No,” Jeb answered. “Did you hit the ceiling?” she asked. Jeb looked up at the spackled ceiling that was distinctly lacking a head-shaped hole. “No.” “Did you do anything that could in any way remotely be construed as flying?” “What does construed mean?” “Did you fly! Did you fly at all!” Ms. Able’s face had turned from green to brown to red now. Jeb tried to take an instinctive step back but slammed into the chalkboard. “No,” Jeb answered. “Are you at all like a bird?” Jeb shook his head no. “Kerbals will never fly. Now sit back down in your seat and pay attention!” Ms. Able pointed vigorously towards Jeb’s seat at the back left of the room. As her arm came to a sudden stop the gelatinous bulges that made up her meaty arms did not, jiggling slightly for a few moments afterwards. Jeb trundled towards his desk, hanging his long green head low to avoid the stares of his classmates. The first few steps were met with complete silence. By the time he was halfway to his desk Ms. Able began moving about. Just as he sat down she pulled the projector screen from its tidy roll above the blackboard until it stretched towards the floor. Keeping an eye on Jeb and the other on the rest of the class, Ms. Able said, “As you know, students, today we begin our health and anatomy module. We will be covering the Kerbal body for the next two weeks. We will discuss your module project after the slide show.” Ms. Able walked down the wide aisle between the classroom (set wider than most classrooms on account of her impressive girth) and stopped near Jeb where the permanent slide projector was stationed on an old wooden platform. “No talking during the slide show. If you have a questions raise your hand and I will answer after we reach a stopping point.” She scanned the room for a moment. “Robert McDonald Kerman, please turn off the lights.” Bob McDonald, a wispy Kerbal with dark, intense eyes stood from his seat at the top right corner of the classroom and switched off the lights. A moment later the projector roared to life and a bright square of light filled the white projection screen at the front of the room. A distinct metallic thunk slightly preceded the first image on the board. Ms. Able then pressed the start button on the tape player and a peppy male voice whirred to life. “The Kerbal body,” The disembodied voice began. “A marvel and a wonder of natural engineering and home to all of your thoughts, feelings, and emotions.” On screen was a fuzzy picture of a dozen different Kerbals of varying ages, all of them, smiling as they stood for an informal portrait in what looked like a park or field. “Next Slide.” This voice was different than the narrator, deeper and with less emotion. Ms. Able clicked the projector and another image appeared. This one was a cartoonish rendering of the inside of a Kerbal’s head. “Kerbals are unique in the animal kingdom,” The narrator continued. “They might not be the fastest, strongest, or largest creatures on Kerbin, but they do have something no other animal can claim—a giant brain capable of complex, rational thought housed in a nearly impenetrable fortress of a skull.” There was a pause in the narration as a flourish of dissonant instruments played a bit of fanfare. Coming out of the recorder it sounded like animals being tortured. “A Kerbal is made up of bones, muscles, ligaments, skin, and about 20% chocolate pudding. In today’s presentation we will begin with the head, perhaps the most amazing part of any Kerbal. A Kerbal’s skull is the thickest of any animal on Kerbin. Inside the thick skull is a secondary layer of a spongey material known as Squidgy Puddo-formus. This combination of rigidity and sponginess protects them from high velocity reading impacts and full contact knitting disasters, things most Kerbals are prone to experience.” Jeb, as the recording continued, slowly lost interest and found his eyes wandering back towards the window. The sky was blue and bright, beautiful. His head might have been in the clouds, but his feet and amazing Kerbal brain were planted firmly on the ground.
  2. Dear fellow Kerbonauts! Let me present you a book (well, it's an E-book after all) what I wrote in the end of the end of the last year (2017), called It's actually a (more-or-less) simple story based on the Carrier mode of KSP from the first sounding rockets to the first Minmus landing. I discussed with @Darth Badie earlier, she agreed and supported me to do it. This book is completely free-of-charge, all credits to SQUAD. I'd like to ask you to read it, and if you like, leave me comments with your opinions, because sometimes in the future I'd like to write another KSP-themed book if the new EULA let me do it. Anyways, here is the link for the promo video I made for the book. The link of the book is in the description of the video. I hope you'll like it. Cheers!
  3. So recently I have been going through a yoshi phase. I had been playing yoshi's island for the past week, and an idea came to me. What if I wrote a book based on the game. With it being a diary that yoshi writes telling about what happens throughout the game, writing as I play. I had even thought of writing something referencing the game it's self (yoshi mentioning how someone in the distant future might make some sort of game based on the story). So my question is, do you think this would be something worth trying?
  4. There was a brief mention in an older thread about the Haynes manuals: I just received the Haynes "Soyuz Owners Workshop Manual" by David Baker, and all I can say is WOW! There's a fair amount of background through Vostok and Voskhod and the development of the "7K-OK" that became the Soyuz we know and love (and I finally understand why it was "7K-OK"), but then Baker really gets into the details. I don't know that I'll necessarily need to know the exact VHF frequencies the radio operates on (though Baker mentions them), but knowing that there's both a shortwave and a VHF system that are in use in recovery operations is interesting. There's enough general detail for non-techies and enough technical detail to satisfy all but the most hardcore. Great stuff. I have the "Gemini" manual on order next, and I have high hopes for it as well.
  5. Hi, As a bachelor Thesis, a friend and I, would like to build a small hybrid rocket engine, that's why I'm looking for some literature that would describe: rocket nozzle theory, thermochemistry of different propellant, thermodynamic, and speaks about the different propulsion method, and of course speaks about hybrid rocket engine. I found the "Rocket Propulsion Elements" by Stutton and Biblarz, but since it cost 200$ in my country, I would like to be sure that it's the best alternative possible. Thanks in advance.
  6. Hello, fellow scifi lovers! I'm back again with another science fiction book. This one is called FLY HIGHER, it's a book about a younger boy who starts his own little space program with the intentions of leaving Earth but runs into several roadblocks along the way. A full conversation about it between me and @Spaceception, author of other awesome scifi books such as The Void and The Children Between Worlds, can be found here: http://forum.kerbalspaceprogram.com/index.php?/profile/164377-the-raging-sandwich/&status=3130&type=status Also, you may have seen parts of my first book (WIP) Outpost, a scifi story (not necessarily a novel) about a crew going on an intergalactic journey searching for a planet with life. It can be found here: http://forum.kerbalspaceprogram.com/index.php?/topic/143762-my-book-outpost/#comment-2675169 So what do you think? Post any thoughts or ideas down below.
  7. So you might have seen one of my previous posts in Science and Spaceflight "Designing a Galaxy." Even though that forum is still open, I've already gotten started on the book as you might know. I'll be posting all the chapters I create here as I create them. Keep in mind these are just the rough drafts! Tell me what you think! Prologue:
  8. As I said on another thread, I'll be writing a book about World War 3 and posting the chapters here. As I'm working on two other books, I won't be posting as much here. Stay tuned!
  9. Hello! I was wondering if it was a good idea to write a book about KSP. I really would like to hear your thoughts and suggestions about this. Thanks!
  10. Im user of a social webpage for readers called wattpad, where you can post your own stories. I post a story based on space called "Eisntein's cage" (on Spanish, sorry), but i felt a bit dissapointed when i saw that other "science-fiction stories" (firtsly and mots hated by me: the zombie's ones) got more famous than mine and more quickly, when i knew that my story (here's coming my egotistical mind) were better. After that, i had that conversation with myself: "If the readers want zombies, should i give them zombies?" "No, dani, you can't, you hate that topic. You cant do it" "I hate the zombies stories of other people, but what about if i do my own story? Made a story that doesnt seem a zombie-like story, but that has them, and also had space, and all the pother things that made my stories mine". "It could work. Now, think. If you dont want a copy of other work. You need a diferent scenario." "A distant planet, with a little human colony" "Okey, it should be enough. Think about the disease that changes the people into zombies, think about the zombies. They cant be normal zombies, they should be special." "The Disease would be a virus of high complexity. The colonists would call it "Güestia"". the zombies wont be zombies, they will be "Heralds"". "Now you need to mantain the story as you write others. You need spaceships. You need an explanation about spaceships, you need and explanation about the entire colony." And after many thoughts, and a longer conversation, the base of my story appeared. Its short for now (i still writting, but it isnt the first time that i wrote an entire chapter, i read it and i say "it sint good" and i delete it. But im progressing. If you are interested on read it, here's the link: (If you speak spanish, theres also a link to the spanish version here) https://www.wattpad.com/story/63567731-taranis-english-version Also, i will be posting the chapters here, so the ksp community didnt need a wattpad account to see it.
  11. Just found that this book/document is available online: http://www.nuclearweaponarchive.org/Library/DocumentArchive/524871.pdf Super interesting. Its about the history of underground nuclear testing. Found it whilst trying to find the lowdown on the hypervelocity "manhole cover" story that we've all heard.
  12. This is really off topic, but I thought at least one person on these forum's can help me, and it's the best one ever BTW. This book was very new around 2009, it's a story about a kid who lives in a world where paper doesn't exist, where it rains acid. His grandfather or an elder of his told him of a land where there is colourful landscapes and clean waters, a place where he can find his parents near by and also paper, they go on a journey through the wasteland and travel through a Pipe which goes all the way to this city, on the way I think the grandfather dies and he continues on, and finds his parents, there is a small patch of land that doesn't get rained on by acid, but the character continues on to this city and meets the princes, etc, she says that he can stay, but he said he needs to get back, he returns to the home town and gets onto the abandoned typewriter and writes the story which was just read. If anyone knows this story please tell me!