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Found 33 results

  1. First post here so sorry if I am posting this in the wrong place When ever I try and build single engine propeller aircraft it rolls to what ever direction the engine is spinning and I also notice that they tend to slowly pitch down on there own. My question is that is there a way to mitigate these issues?
  2. This post is to share some tips at improving the efficiency of turboshaft engines, driving propeller blades (airplanes) or rotor blades (helicopters). The concepts should apply equally to electric rotors driving propellers or heli-blades. I'm using 1.7.3, the electric rotors, turboshaft engines, and propeller/heli blades are new to stock KSP, so in later versions some of this info might become outdated. It's easy to focus on either the Turboshaft Engine, or the Prop/Heli blades when troubleshooting 'why doesn't my vessel work'. The reality is you need to look at both elements to make a functioning prop-airplane or helicopter. The engine produces torque, which spins a shaft. This is important, torque produces zero thrust. Add all the torque you want, it will not produce any thrust- until it is coupled to a lifting device, such as a propeller blade or heli blade. On the other hand, the prop/heli blade also produces no thrust unless it is moving. You can angle the blades any way you want, they will produce no thrust unless they are moving. The movement is provided by the Turboshaft Engine (or electric rotor). As of 1.7.3, the stock engines can rotate at a maximum rate of 460 rpm, which is evidently a Unity limitation. Adding torque will increase rotational speed (rpm) up to that limit of 460 rpm. What happens if you are already at 460 rpm, and increase torque? That's an important question. What happens (in 1.7.3) is you increase the Fuel Flow (or EC draw), but do not get any increase in rpm. Beyond 460 rpm, adding torque is simply wasting fuel. In the following examples, we're going to experiment with turboshaft engines. There are two variables we are going to adjust, and unfortunately they are on two different parts. One is the Torque of the Turboshaft Engine, the other is the Authority Limiter of the prop/heli blades. To make things easy, I like to assign these values to action groups. I assign Engine Torque to the Main Throttle, and the Blade Authority Limiter I assign to Translate Forward/Back (usually 'H' and 'N'). Okay, lets get started. Here's a turboshaft engine we're going to play with. It's in the 'propeller' configuration, but the idea is the same for helicopters. Ok, we have an engine built on a stand, let's play with it to see how Torque, Blade Authority, RPM, Fuel Flow, and Thrust are related. In the next spoiler window, I'll play with Torque and Blade Authority Limit, to see what happens to rpm and Fuel Flow. Keep in mind that Thrust is only dependent on rpm and blade angle. If my rpm and blade angle stay constant, but my Fuel Flow increases, I have not increased my thrust. I'm just wasting fuel at that point. So, one goal is to find the minimum Fuel Flow which will maintain a specific rpm at a specific blade angle. Here goes. In the next spoiler window, I'll demonstrate an actual aircraft, making adjustments to torque (and Prop Authority) to reduce fuel burn. Ideally I'd use a single-engine airplane to keep things simple. However, counter-acting the torque effects of a single-engine are difficult to design for, and fly efficiently. It's easier to just make a plane with two counter-rotating engines and propellers. Then, it flies quite easily just like a jet, with no nasty torque effects. The takeaway here is that to get the most out of the turboshaft engines and propeller or helicopter blades, you need to look at more than just the engine or just the blades. Both elements need to be adjusted for optimum performance. Ideally, you need to be able to adjust both Torque and Blade Authority Limit in flight, to adjust for varying conditions. Regarding efficiency, the big takeaway is that adding Torque beyond what is required to maintain rpm is just wasting fuel, and lots of it. As of 1.7.3, I believe the concept is the same for electric rotors driving propellers or heli blades- adding torque beyond what is required is only wasting EC.
  3. I'm creating a V-22 Osprey replica with the new robotic parts (incredibly original idea, I know). I am using the largest helicopter blades and the R7000 turboshaft engine. The vehicle lifts off fine, albeit with some help from vernor engines, but the second I enter it into "plane" mode the engines are massively too weak to propel it, capping at about 35m/s. The vehicle weighs 66,5 tonnes. Is there any way of improving the thrust/weight ratio without adding more rotor/jet engines? Why is it that they have enough power to lift the whole thing off the ground, but not to propel it? Since I'm new here and couldn't figure out how to insert images into my post, here's an imgur link: https://imgur.com/a/msRQ73z
  4. This is the new thread. The original thread can be found here. Advanced Jet Engine About Advanced Jet Engine gives jets, propellers, and rotors realistic performance in KSP. NathanKell's valiant efforts have made stock performance much more reasonable in recent versions of KSP, but it's still a very long way from realistic. AJE calculates performance for air-breathing engines based on real thermodynamics. Features Real-world jet engines AJE uses thermodynamic equations to calculate jet engine performance in flight. Real throttle Throttle is linked to fuel consumption instead of thrust. Afterburners, if installed on the engine, is turned on when throttle > 66% and off when throttle <= 66% Overheat. Like in real world, not all engines can tolerate the heat from air compression of hypersonic flight. This is affected by both mach number and throttle Inlet. Each engine requires a minimum inlet area (see right click menu in editor). Make sure you have enough inlet till you see "Inlet Area:100%" in flight. Each inlet has a TPR(total recovery pressure) that is dependent on Mach number and angle of attack. Avoid TPR loss by facing the inlet to the freestream. Download Download Latest Version from Github Also available on CKAN Troubleshooting If you are experiencing an issue, please read this topic, if you have not already, on how to get proper support. Incomplete support requests will not be processed. Most importantly, include logs. Source On Github Requirements Each release of AJE is intended to be run with a particular version of KSP. Please only use that version. If you have an earlier version of KSP AJE requires these mods to work. It will not function if they are missing or not installed properly. ModuleManager SolverEngines AJE does not explicitly depend on Ferram Aerospace Research but has not been tested without it, and you will probably think that your engines are very underpowered in stock aero. Recommendations Ferram Aerospace Research, as above. AJE might work without it, but it's not tested and you will probably not have much fun Real Fuels - if you're going to have realistic jet engines, why not use them with real world fuels? Mod Support AJE has configs to work with the following mods' engines: B9 Aerospace SXT (Lack's Stock Extension) Bahamuto Dynamics KAX (Kerbal Aircraft Expansion) AJE has configs for these mods, but the configs may not be up to date: Mark IV Spaceplane System AJE has configs for these mods, but the mods themselves haven't been updated in a while: Taverio's Pizza and Aerospace D12 Aerotech Retro Future Changelog License AJE is licensed under the GNU Lesser General Public License Version 2.0 AJE incorporates portions of NASA EngineSim; used according to NASA's license thereof with due credit. AJE incorporates portions of JSBSim by Jon S. Berndt, used in accordance with the LGPLv2 Authors @camlost @NathanKell @ferram4 @blowfish And all others who have submitted fixes and enhancements
  5. I have seen one other suggestion topic about this before and it was abruptly closed and not re-opened again. Really my question is why don't we have propellers yet and what might the chances of us getting them be? (And yes, I'm aware of mods, but I happen to like playing games stock)
  6. Disclaimer: English isn't my native language, I do my best. Clay Parts; no it's not about clay but its malleability. My idea is a completely revamp part system where your parts adapt to the shape, size, fonctionnality and visual you want. Less parts (even with a lot of mods), just highly configurable ones and configurations. ClayAddons will be a serie of standalone mod that interact with each other alot. This post is about discussing and defining the theoretical rules between each part and functionality. Ex: relation between size and thrust of an engine. As ClayAddons will contain alot of stuff we will go step by step. First one engine! How engine are handle by the mod (ClayEngine). Engines includes everything that allow movement, motion or implied motion ex electric generator. In fact the mod include no engine, but engine module or component (you can have multiple engine module in one part and module on a part can interact with module on other parts). Ex1: the propeller is a module, piston engine is another one. Ex2: combustion chamber is a module, tuyere (nozzle) is another one. Each module have a whole range of option ex: size, number of piston(piston engine), number of blades(propeller). Each module can have one or multiple virtual and physical nodes. Module node are port for linking modules with each other like electric plug. Nodes can be connected when module are placed inline or with various cable: electric cable, fuel line, shaft, cable(rope or metal cable), track(for wheel), chain, belt, pipes(yes pipes for air, water and ??????. So air intake need to be connected to engine using pipes.) Virtual nodes are for internal use only. Physical nodes will lead to the outside of the part of his module if not linked to anything else ex: exhaust, air intake. For physic ease all those internal logic will be simplified at vessel load. I need your help to define module their nodes and options. +Mass etc let focus even more---> Propeller engine + Piston engine Propeller component: core (nose cone): size, mass, drag, internals blades: number, size, drag, design, thrust ressource: torque, rotation, air, thrust, data Piston engine component: piston: number, size, configuration, mass, power ressource: electricity, gas(oxygen), gas(CO2), liquid fuel, torque, rotation, heat, data Gearbox: type(planetary, ....), mass, size ressource: torque, rotation Shaft: mass, size ressource: torque, rotation Those four element interact by torque and rotation For later
  7. Is there a way to make functioning, preferably electric, propeller engines in the stock game, without having them be a separate craft? I know of one youtuber who built a cool fan boat, but his design required stage separating the propeller assembly and controlling it as a separate craft. I'm looking for a way to propel an amphibious base on Eve's bodies of explodium, so jet engines are out of the question, and rockets would be extremely inefficient.
  8. Dunasoar is a twin engine airplane designed for Duna exploration. It can transport 5 kerbals, or it can be easily modified to run science gathering missions. Max speed is about 175 m/s. Plane uses modified version of my fairing prop engines powered by fuel cells, but if you don't like using the fuel cells you can replace them with RTG's. These engines are little bit bulkier than my usual fairing prop engines. But the best part about them is that I've finally managed to create a reliable mechanism, which uses the claw inside the engine nacelle, to re-dock the propeller to the plane. That way the plane can be used multiple times, and you don't have to worry about the engines falling apart if you leave physics range. Finally you can make a plane which you can use to explore all biomes on Duna or Eve. As usual when flying a plane on Duna trickiest parts are takeoff and landing so choose your landing area carefully. Here is a link to the craft file and instructions on how to fly plane.
  9. Do you guys think that propeller engines should be added to KSP? Propellers would serve as precursors to Jet engines in Career mode. They would have less thrust, but would drain fuel slower. They would also be cheaper than other jet engines.
  10. I'm mostly asking for help in this thread. I'm currently trying to develop vehicles I can deploy permanently in the field to support a career mode colonization effort. This means I need to set up mining facilities, SSTOs, and small towns on every planet. Perhaps the most difficult planet to set up such a colony with reusable technologies on is Eve. Thanks to its dense atmosphere, simply using aircraft to fly at faster than driving speeds between bases is a compelling option. However, jet engines obviously don't work inside Eve's atmosphere. So, I have to resort to stock electric propellers (unless I want gas guzzling rocket planes that are mostly fuel, and need to land and refuel multiple times in one trip). My difficulty is prototyping a stock electric propeller with the specifications I want. I wanted to make one out of .625 meter parts, to push the size and mass limits of stock propellers (and then scale up from there for larger planes). This means using .625 reaction wheels, and possibly using .625 meter decouplers in some manner as the bearings. Next, the prop needs to be able to redock to the mothership, since propellers tend to break easily whenever the game loads or unloads a vehicle with a propeller. And finally, the propeller needs to be a sub-assembly with a docking port, so that I can change out a broken engine in the field if I need to. No sense in condemning an aircraft I went through the trouble of getting to Eve if all that broke is the propeller. Anyway, I haven't had too much luck, a whole lot of friction between parts, and the prop breaking free of the different kinds of bearings I've designed. So I thought I'd turn to the KSP community for tips or tricks on designing props that aren't just for show, but are actually useful and utilitarian. The ability to redock is probably the part I care most about. I also have the making history pack, so I have those parts to draw from for making props as well. The structural tubes might be useful for 1.25 meter props and up.
  11. After learning how to make propellers in stock KSP, I wondered if it was possible to make a solar-powered aircraft, like Solar Impulse or the NASA Helios. The problem is, all the propeller engine designs I've seen require the engine to be physically separate from the aircraft, preventing electricity from wing-mounted solar panels from reaching it. Is it possible to make a propeller engine that isn't physically separated from the aircraft, or somehow "beam" electricity into the engine? If not, are there any easy code fixes that can allow either of those things?
  12. Typically, as the thrust produced depends on the propeller used and the airspeed, propeller engine performance IRL is measured in horsepower or kilowatts. As stock propellers require a constant amount of electricity to run, we can find their in-game power consumption in units per second easily—in fact, by just looking at the Resource bars. However, there are 2 potential ways to convert this into real units: A solar panel of a certain area pointed ideally at Kerbol from Kerbin will produce a certain amount of charge per second. An in-game power-per-unit-area figure can be calculated from that. Compare that with Earth's 1361 W/m3 ideal power-per-unit-area figure. This will of course depend on the efficiency of the solar panels used, but assumptions can be made. More reliably, the Realism Overhaul mod suite has a conversion factor from units of electric charge to Watts in case a part specifies its power consumption that way. So, it should be possible to measure the power output of stock propeller engine. It should also be possible, though difficult, to measure the mechanical efficiency of the engine by taking into account the rotary's* moment of inertia, angular acceleration, and cruise angular velocity. Has anyone ever thought of this before? Regardless, if you have made a stock propeller aircraft, please post the power output of the planes and engines you've made, as well as preferably their masses. Posting mechanical efficiency would be really awesome. *Most KSP stock props are technically rotary engines.
  13. Introducing the LF (Light Flyer) 1, 'Bear'. It has space for six Kerbals, can fly for around 3 hours, has airbrakes and parachutes, can be fitted with landing gear or floats, and has a top speed of 281m/s, and only costs 15,000!
  14. Trying to work on Eve SSTO, realized that it's impossible. Although, in this process I got a single stage (stock) propeller plane with rockets equipped capable of orbit. It ascends to the edge of the stratosphere only with propellers, and get into orbit with rockets. Album https://imgur.com/a/Ux6qS will appear when post is submitted So propeller plane can get to stable orbit, if enough rocket engines and fuel are provided. Then, a new question arose. How far can a propeller plane go? Rules: 1. No cheating, No Alt+F12 cheats in flight. (Visible bits are allowed) + No mods with gameplay effects. (Again, visible mods are allowed) 2. Only rocket engines and stock propellers are allowed on the entire flight. No airbreathers, no infiniglides, no gyroscope drive, etc. 3. The plane should be able to take off and fly around fully-fueled with propeller-only. 4. Propellers should be able to be re-docked to the craft, to ensure the completeness of the craft on orbit after physics load. 5. It shouldn't take over an hour for a craft to get to orbit. 6. At least a kerbal should be on board. Score is the dv left on orbit. The destination of the plane can be noted on the leaderboard. Leaderboard: + All rocket engines allowed 1. @Reusables 3m/s 2. @Reusables 0m/s + Propeller-Nerv SSTO 1. @Reusables 3m/s + Propeller-Ion SSTO 1. + Propeller Passenger Plane (contains Mk3 Passenger Module) 1.
  15. To start off, I would like to credit MajorJim as the original creator of the bearing. Klond and Azimech for developing the modification that uses RCS Balls. Big thanks again to Azimech for showing ways of optimizing the bearing to make it even better and even more reliable. ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ With that out the way, Here's the actual post. I apologize for not existing for so long, there's no reason for it, I was just too lazy to post again. I've made many planes (mostly with spinny propeller things) so today, the one I've picked out for today is... The DC-3 Dakota (AKA, the C-47 Skytrain) The DC-3 was an airliner developed in the 1930s and was developed from the earlier DC-2. The DC-3 turned out to be one of the most successful aircraft in the world. What makes it unique compared to most aircraft designed before WWII, the DC-3 is still in (limited) use. During WWII, the DC-3 was converted into a military transport called the C-47. It was considered one of the best transports during the war. The replica I've created is down below. _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Instructions and Download 1: As soon as the crafts spawns in, turn on the brake. 2: Decouple the propellers and turn on SAS afterward. 3: Switch to one of the propellers using the [ ] keys. 4: If the propeller selected is on the left, hold down ALT and E until the roll indicator in the bottom left has reached completely to the right. 5: If the propeller selected is on the right, hold down ALT and Q until the roll indicator in the bottom left has reached completely to the left. 6: Switch back to the main craft, and turn off the brakes as soon as the propellers are both spinning 7: If done correctly, the plane should start to move. On takeoff, the plane should take off on it's own if left alone with SAS on. 8: Have a nice flight. Try avoiding excess manouevers. Download (HERE) _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Thank you for reading! Sorry I've been away for a while. However, as a sorry gift for keeping you guys waiting, I have a bonus craft down below. Enjoy!
  16. I have a working stock propeller (following Squiddy's tutorial). It works properly and will fly, but when I switch from the propeller to the plane, the propeller's trim (alt+e) lock gets reset and it slows down. I have to keep switching back from the plane to the propeller to spin it up again. Does anyone know how to keep the propeller spinning when I switch vessels (keep trim lock on)? Sorry for the possibly confusing description of the problem, please ask if I need to clarify something.
  17. I've got a bit of a desire to get a Redbull air race type course set up in KSP. I know it's possible but I'm not sure exactly how to do it. Also, KAX is the only mod I know with a similar type engine but it's severely under-performing. Is there another mod with a better engine?
  18. The Mustang is a new Mk1 sized Turboprop fighter from KAe systems, it is being built to enter the Stock Turboprop DogFight challenge and may be selected by entities to fulfil the role of Airborne Combat Patrol and Homeland Defense. Mustang Prototype Download The Mustang prototype has been under development for quite a while. There were several technical challenges to be overcome. Today we are unveiling the prototype for review. This version is a test-bed for new technologies and will be worked on to increase speed, range and include armaments. It has a top speed currently of 60.5ms in level flight (don't be fooled by the navball, the wings are pitched so even though the nose is slightly down, the wings are level and maintaining altitude). It is as efficient as could be built although it is currently under-powered for military purposes. It uses two twin Juno KAe Mercator engines in a push/pull configuration. It is envisaged the production version will be equipped with the tri Juno Brigand engine. A lot of effort was put into making this aircraft AI controllable for the Stock Turboprop DogFight challenge, so it could not be finicky, or need special tricks to fly. As such it is remarkable easy to fly for a pilot, just stage (space), engage SAS (t), and full throttle (z). Pull up at about 40ms and it should lift smoothly off the tarmac, you don't even have to worry about tail prop strike. Landing is as straightforward as any other aircraft, though landing pitch of more than 10' may cause damage. Stall speed is below 30ms. Mustang Prototype - Top Speed You can eke slightly more speed out of it by deploying the rear blades. Mustang Prototype Development
  19. INTRODUCTION "Now I am become death, the destroyer of worlds." ~Nikolai N. Polikarpov after preliminary flight testing of the Po-2, circa June 1927 A.D. Well, so out of all the high performance, cutting edge propeller aircraft I could build, I've decided to recreate this. Speed of a caffeinated YF-12, maneuverability of a F-15S/MTD, firepower of an Iowa-class battleship. The true top tier airframe from a more civilized age. On a serious note, the Po-2 was initially designated U-2, and was created in late 20s in the USSR as a general-purpose aircraft. During the WWII it was usually used as a reconaissance aircraft, but low-level night bombing runs were also quite common, made especially famous by the 588th Night Bomber Regiment, composed of an all-woman pilot and ground crew complement. Suprisingly, the Po-2s combat usage did not end in 1945. Polikarpov biplanes were spotted over the Korean skies in the early 50s, mostly used as reconaissance and light bomber aircraft. Frankly, the USAF pilots reported the Po-2 to be notoriously hard to shoot down due to it's extremely low, sub-200kph top speed which sat below the stall speed of most US jet aircraft. Apart from combat use, the Po-2 has seen service among many airforces, serving as a trainer and utility aircraft in the miitary. It's 5 cylinder 100HP Shvestov M-11 radial engine was incredibly low-maintenance, making the Po-2 extremely well-suited for service in rough conditions. Albeit unarmed at first, later variants of this aircraft recieved a ShKAS machinegun as a rear turret and a small bombload of 250kg. FEATURES Not all that much in the way of features on this one due to it's small size. There are a few though: 1. Fully functional, spinning propeller, along with a semi-detailed Shvestov M-11 engine. 2. Flaps, toggleable with AG 1 3. Some nice little details, such as the gear assembly, the wing spars and the ShKAS MG in the back. 4. 1:1 scale, which is a feature considering how small the whole thing is! (only 8m long, that isn't much space to fit alot of detail in, really.) HOW TO FLY Due to it's relatively low-power engine, the Po-2 requires some special care while flying. Startup procedures are identical to all my other prop planes, namely: 1. Startup and takeoff Idle the throttle and engage brakes. SAS needs to be off. Stage the first stage. The ring securing the propeller in place will come off. Switch to the propeller with " ] ". Start up the propeller. Hold down ALT and either Q or E. Hold the key until the roll indicator in the bottom left corner of the screen will reach it's limit. Remember to have SAS disengaged in this stage if you want the propeller to work. SAS, along with neutralising set roll trim with ALT can be used to stop the propeller post-flight. Switch back to the main vessel, engage the SAS (although the craft is perfectly flyable without it of course) and disengage the brakes. After the propeller has started rotating sufficiently quickly you can add throttle and begin the takeoff. Allow the plane to gain speed. It will, albeit rather slowly. Wait until the plane hit's AT LEAST 21m/s, then you can ever so slightly apply elevator. Now is the hardest part of the whole flight: Manipulate the elevator and keep the plane level, so that your speed starts to increase. Once it's above approx. 30-35m/s you are fying safely. 2. Flight Turn gently and dont bank too much, since the rudder response is average at best, and if you find yourself low on speed (sub-20m/s) while banking, you might find yourself unable to level the plane out before it loses too much altitude. Watch the speed and keep it above 20-25m/s, preferably even higher. Under 20m/s the plane will stall out. Apply elevator delicately, don't bleed speed if not necessary, climb at a shallow angle. Watch out not to clip the propeller into the ground while landing. Here we have an entirely historical photo of a Po-2 carrying a RDS-37 thermonuclear bomb since, as we all know, the Po-2 was the backbone of Soviet strategic bomber force during the Cold War. Fly safe and enjoy. Feel free to leave suggestions on what i should build next. The plane is built out of 133 parts btw. All stock. DOWNLOAD LINK https://kerbalx.com/EvenFlow/Po-2 Updated on 24-07-2017, V1.0 CHANGELOG 1.0 - initial release
  20. I've decided to move up a war for planes to replicate (Don't worry, I'll still be doing some more WWI planes! ) and this was the result. It was my first time working with a custom cockpit, and I really hope it doesn't look like absolute trash . This replica was a lot more difficult to do than the previous two, so if quality is lacking, I apologise The plane in real life: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Now, before I show off my replica of the Zero, I'd first like to credit MajorJim for the revolutionary stock bearing technology he's developed. Without it, my planes would still be using jet engines to fly *Gasp* (Link Here) With that out of the way, here's the Mitsubishi A6M Zero! The A6M Zero was a naval fighter developed by the Japanese in World War II. It was brought early into the war and gained a legendary status of being a fantastic dogfighter. It was so fantastic that it's kill ration was 12 - 1. It was considered the finest fighter until 1943. The zero had manoueverability that was un-matched, even compared to the Spitfire. Unlike the allied fighters however, the Zero had a lack of armour. This saved on weight which caused it to have excellent range. I based the replica primarily off the A6M2 Zero. ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Pictures ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Top Speed: 52.3m/s (May vary with flight) Top Speed (In Dive): 70-80m/s (Depends on your bravery) Takeoff Speed: 19-20m/s Stall Speed: 12-18m/s ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Download and Instructions Since the instructions to fly this thing are literally the exact same as my Sopwith Camel, here's an extract to save me some time Just ignore the bit about being a twenty minuter, it ain't World War I anymore (Download here) ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Thanks for reading my post! I'll be returning to making World War I Planes soon I think, coming up next is a replica of the Fokker D1. Depending on how I feel.
  21. Before I start talking about my plane, I have to credit Major Jim for designing the tech for the propellers. Without it, I'd still be using jet engines to power my planes (THE HORROR!) (Link Here) With that out the way, here's the.... Vickers Vimy Heavy Bomber! In case you don't exactly know what the Vickers Vimy is; the Vickers Vimy was a World War I era heavy bomber that was introduced pretty late into the war. It got used as late as 1933! It was also the first plane to cross the Atlantic Ocean non-stop and it was the first to travel from England to Australia! Here's the plane in real life: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ I bet you're itching to see my replica then. Well, here it is in KSP! ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Top Speed: 32.9m/s Top Speed (In Dive) 42m/s (and then the propellers break apart if gone past this speed) Part Count: 306 (Might not be too good on older computers) (Download Here) Instructions: 1: Decouple the propellers from the main ship and make sure you have SAS on the plane itself, but NOT the propellers. 2: Switch to a propeller 3: For the LEFT propeller, hold Alt + E until the roll bar at the bottom is maxxed out and is rotating at full speed. (Make sure SAS is off) 4: For the RIGHT propeller hold Alt + Q, and do the same thing as the last propeller 5: Decouple the Launch Stability Enhancer 6: Leave the plane be, and wait until 25-27m/s and the plane should lift of the ground itself (Provided SAS is turned on) 7: Have fun being a twenty minuter, or an ace! ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ I don't consider myself to be any good at making replicas, I'd appreciate some tips and critiques on the craft. (How it looks, how it flies, part count, etc.) Thanks for viewing my post/thread/thingy. I don't know what to call these. Sopwith Camel out now:
  22. INTRODUCTION Hey there again. After finishing building and tweaking the Wyvern which was my first attempt to create a single engine propeller airframe replica. Right away, I've started working on yet another one, this time recreating a weapon from an earlier decade, when the world was engulfed in conflict. The 190 was a German single-seat, single-engine fighter aircraft designed by Kurt Tank in the late 1930s and widely used during World War II. Along with its well-known counterpart, the Messerschmitt Bf 109, the Focke-Wulf 190 Würger became the backbone of the Luftwaffe's fighter force. The Dora version, unlike the earlier Anton and Friedrich, was powered by an inverted 12 cylinder Jumo 213A engine (which is quite in-detail modeled in this replica!) which was fit for better performance at higher altitudes. The inline engine brought some design changes, e.g. different exhaust pipes and the distinct lenghtened nose section. The Dora proved to be a formidable opponent to all Allied counterparts from 1944, but as with the majority of German arsenal in the later years of WWII it was troubled by being outnumbered and hard to maintain. Even the fearsome armament of 2x MG151 root-mounted 20mm cannons coupled with a pair of 13mm MG131s in the nose couldn't stop the oncoming onslaughts of B-17 bombers. Even although the plane itself didn't change the tide of the conflict, you can now take it to the skies yet again in KSP with this replica. It consists of little over 150 parts and has some neat features which make flying it out exceedingly fun compared to other craft. FEATURES Features of this aircraft are mostly all the standard stuff you see on my other replicas, coupled with the detailed engine interior. Just to name a few: 1. Functional flaps, activated with AG 1 2. Openable engine cowling which reveals a detailed replica of the inverted V12 Junkers Jumo 213A engine. (Toggle with AG 2) 3. Functional, spinning propeller which adds alot of immersion to the replica. 4. Correctly placed guns and antennae, alot of little details here and there. 5. Actually useful drop tank which gets drained before the rest of the tanks. Ditch it with staging. HOW TO FLY Pretty much the same things that apply to the Wyvern, apply here. The Fw-190D has a little bit less torque at low speeds, that is the only real difference. 1. Startup and takeoff Idle the throttle and engage brakes. SAS needs to be off. Stage the first stage. The ring securing the propeller in place will come off. Switch to the propeller with " ] ". Start up the propeller. Hold down ALT and either Q or E. Hold the key until the roll indicator in the bottom left corner of the screen will reach it's limit. Remember to have SAS disengaged in this stage if you want the propeller to work. SAS, along with neutralising set roll trim with ALT can be used to stop the propeller post-flight. Switch back to the main vessel, engage the SAS (although the craft is perfectly flyable without it of course) and disengage the brakes. After the propeller has started rotating sufficiently quickly you can add throttle and begin the takeoff. The plane will take off by itself after reaching approx 65m/s. Tailwheel and rudder can be used to counter the torque generated by the engine which can be felt while the plane is low on speed (this also applies to real life propeller engines) 2. Flight Flying the Dora is rather easy. The plane is stable at any speeds above it's stall speed (which sits at about 50m/s), will reach speeds of up to 145m/s (and over 220m/s in a dive), and the fuel will last for a while. The drop tank is expended first, after it runs dry you can jettison it with staging. Turning is safe at any speed within it's flight envelope, but due to compression not being modelled it will lose speed in high speed turns rather quickly. Mild turns are advised if you are planning to keep your speed up. Just like in real life, roll rate of this plane gets rather sluggish when your speed is too low. Keep an eye on your speed during tight turns to prevent stalling. Optimal climb can be achieved at approx 90m/s TAS at most altitudes. 3. Landing To drop your speed quickly, feel free to pop the flaps. Get your speed down to about 70m/s, retract the gear and lower the throttle. Watch out not to come in nose-first, since this could damage your propeller. Engage brakes after touchdown, use the tailwheel to taxi into a desirable position. Engine can be turned off with methods described in "Pre-flight procedures and startup" section. I really think this is one of the better replicas I've created. I hope you will enjoy flying it as much as I did during all the testing. DOWNLOAD LINK https://kerbalx.com/EvenFlow/Fw-190D-9 Updated on 22-07-2017, V1.0 CHANGELOG 1.0 - initial release
  23. INTRODUCTION After returning to KSP after a lengthy hiatus and watching a few videos on propeller-driven aircraft in KSP I've decided to start off with something ambitious. The Tu-95, or "Bear" (NATO callsign assigned to the Tu-95) is a long range strategic bomber designed by the USSR in the early 50s to provide the Soviet Air Force with a bomber capable of reaching targets overseas without refueling. They achieved this feat through the use of extremely efficient Kuznetsov NK-12 turboprop engines. Being the most powerful propeller-driven aircraft to ever take it to the skies the Tu-95 boasted a respectable bombload comparable with it's US counterpart - the B-52. The famous nose refueling probe first appeared on the K version of the aircraft which extended it's already impressive range even further from 10000km to over 14500km with support from aerial tankers. This immense operational range caused the Bear to become a feared weapon among the US airmen who were often sortied to intercept the bombers conducting operations in proximity of US airspace. FEATURES This KSP version comes with a range of functions to make flying this leviathan a unique experience. -Four stock propeller turboprop engines. I've decided to resort to propellers being there for mostly visual purposes. Turbines serve as the main source of thrust for the plane. Working on the bearings (Credits to Squiddy for the idea!) for a few hours was worth it in my view - watching the engines spin up individually is a magical experience. They operate incredibly smoothly. Instructions on operating the engines will be included further down. -Clean bomb bay capable of housing various ordnance up to 1.25m radius. -RDS-37 Thermonuclear bomb replica in the bomb bay -Functional, historically correct flaps. -Detailed engine nacelles - no aesthetic tradeoffs from using the propeller mechanism. -Correctly placed gear! As much as i loved winged's Bear i saw a while ago on the forums his landing gear placement, necessary due to Bear's long and heavy tail section was bugging me for a long time. He was a great inspiration in making this replica too. -Relatively rigid, wobble-proof construction -Near-historical specifications: Length: 40.3m (46.2m historically) Wingspan: 43.3m (50m historically) Height: 10m (11.1m historically) Weight: ~88t dry (90t historically) Top speed: ~215m/s (227m/s historically) Partcount: 488 HOW TO FLY ACTION GROUPS BRAKES (B) - Engages brakes ACTION GROUP 1 - Toggle turbines ACTION GROUP 2 - Toggle flaps ACTION GROUP 3 - Toggle landing lights ACTION GROUP 4 - Toggle bomb bay door GEAR (G) - Toggle main gear " [ " AND " ] " - Toggle between propeller controls and aircraft controls PRE-FLIGHT AND STARTUP -Decrease throttle to zero and preferably engage brakes to prevent plane from rolling down the runway -Engage stage 1 to spool up the turbines -Engage stage 2 to release bearings, SAS should be disengaged at this point -Begin the engine startup procedure. Switch to the first propeller by pressing " ] " twice -Hold Alt key and press down on Q or E key (preferably Q for left engines and E for right engines) -You will see the roll indicator in the bottom left corner of the screen slowly move to the side -Wait until the indicator hits the limit of the roll gauge, the propeller should start up. -Move onto the next engine by pressing " ] " twice. Repeat steps until all engines are started up. -You are now standing on the runway at idle thrust, engines running. Time to go flying. TAKEOFF AND FLIGHT -Switch back to the plane controls with " ] " key, release the brakes, thrust idle. -Engage the SAS preferably for an easier takeoff run, although the craft is mostly passively stable on the runway and in the air. -You can deploy flaps with " 2 " for extra immersion, although KSP physics limit their effectiveness. -Throttle up to max power, let engines spool up and start rolling. -Let the aircraft gain speed. For the Tu-95 V1 is at ~70m/s and preferable V2 is at ~90-95m/s -Apply elevator until positive rate, retract gear and flaps. -Wait for the plane to gain some speed for maneuvering, approx 120/s allows you to maneuver safely without risking a stall. FLIGHT CHARACTERISTICS This craft handles as you would expect from a heavy strategic bomber, although it's maneuverability is by no means frustrating. SAS helps with stability so it is advised to utilize it for the duration of the flight. It has plenty of wing area and is designed to be naturally stable during flight so unless you try something stupid the plane should not cause you problems. Landing with flaps allows for higher AoA during approach, advisable landing speed is ~105m/s. SHUTDOWN -Engine shutdown is possible via two different ways after coming to a full stop at the runway 1. Switch to each engine control and engage SAS to stop the propeller 2. Use the Alt trim to revert trim back to it's neutral position, the propeller will come to a stop shortly afterwards. I really hope that you will have as much fun flying this thing as I had designing it. Enjoy! DOWNLOAD LINK https://kerbalx.com/EvenFlow/Tu-95K Updated on 22-07-2017, V1.1 CHANGELOG 1.0 - initial release 1.1 - changes to some minor details, e.g. positioning of the anti-shock bodies on the horizontal stabilizers, added a replica of the RDS-37 thermonuclear bomb into the bomb bay, revamped the page of the craft as a part of a major overhaul.
  24. INTRODUCTION Hi everyone. Ever since I've created my replica of the Soviet Tu-95K bomber with stock parts I have been thinking about taking the idea of stock propeller plane replicas further. And after a few months of hiatus, here is the fruit of this ambitious plan. This is one of the very few replicas of this magnificent superprop attack plane from the 50s in KSP, and, as far as I am aware, the only one created with solely vanilla parts. The propeller has some limited functionality in terms of actually propelling the plane, but is mostly here for the looks. The majority of power is provided by the exhaust pipes on the sides of the airplane which isn't that much of a stretch in terms of realism. The real Wyvern also gained some additional thrust from it's turbine exhaust, so it's just the matter of scale and proportion here. This replica doesn't only approximate the real deal's looks and proportions, but also comes very close in terms of performance even in stock aerodynamics model. PERFORMANCE Here are some stats gained from preliminary testing. Real life performance figures are marked in red. Top speed: 604km/h vs 616km/h Rate of climb: Varies with altitude, approx. 15-16m/s loaded with fuel vs 11m/s stated on Wikipedia (Couldn't access historical sheets but i am pretty sure it is higher than that especially at low altitude) Loaded weight: 10.975kg vs 11.113kg (This is MTOW for the real Wyvern so the loaded weight is probably even more accurate) Turn time was hard to judge correctly, partly due to unclear testing circumstances and partly due to the fact that KSP does not model compression correctly, thus making planes vastly overperform at high speed turns. At mid to low speeds in range of 280 to 360km/h the craft turns pretty much as you would expect from an 11 ton attack aircraft. In short - it will not pull 20Gs at 80m/s. FEATURES I've tried to model the most vital features of the real aircraft into this replica. The Wyvern S4 comes with: 1. Correctly distributed and modeled flaps, activated via Action Group 1 2. Openable engine cowling which allows the pilot to take a look into the engine, which apart from it's mechanism is semi-realistically detailed with some shenanigans. It is toggleable via Action Group 2 3. Retractable tailhook for carrier landings. It's not like you will be performing many of those in KSP though sadly. Activated through Action Group 3 4. Functional, spinning, fully stock propeller assembly. The instructions on how to get it to work properly are attached further below. 5. Plenty of little details such as correctly placed antennas, Hispano cannon props in the wings etc. HOW TO FLY: 1. Pre-flight procedures and startup Before taking this turboprop cow to the skies there are some things you need to do. Idle the throttle and engage brakes. SAS needs to be off. Stage the first stage. The ring securing the propeller in place will come off and your control will be redirected to the propeller. Start up the propeller. Hold down ALT and either Q or E. Hold the key until the roll indicator in the bottom left corner of the screen will reach it's limit. Remember to have SAS disengaged in this stage if you want the propeller to work. SAS, along with neutralising set roll trim with ALT can be used to stop the propeller post-flight. Switch back to the main vessel, engage the SAS (although the craft is perfectly flyable without it of course) and disengage the brakes. After the propeller has started rotating sufficiently quickly you can add throttle and begin the takeoff. The plane will take off by itself after reaching approx 60m/s. Tailwheel and rudder can be used to counter the torque generated by the engine which can be felt while the plane is low on speed (this also applies to real life propeller engines) 2. Flight Flying the Wyvern is very easy. The plane is stable at any speeds above it's stall speed (which sits at about 40m/s), will reach speeds of up to 170m/s (and over 230m/s in a dive), and the fuel will last for ages. The drop tanks are expended first, after they run dry you can jettison them with staging. Turning is safe at any speed in it's flight envelope, but due to compression not being modelled it will lose speed in high speed turns rather quickly. Mild turns are advised if you are planning to keep your speed up. Just like in real life, roll rate of this plane gets rather sluggish when your speed is too low. Keep an eye on your speed during tight turns to prevent stalling. Optimal climb can be achieved at approx 80m/s TAS at most altitudes. 3. Landing Landing the Wyvern is relatively easy due to it's low stall speed and flaps doubling as very effective airbrakes. To drop your speed quickly, feel free to pop the flaps. Get your speed down to about 70m/s, retract the gear and lower the throttle. Watch out not to come in nose-first, since this could damage your propeller. Engage brakes after touchdown, use the tailwheel to taxi into a desirable position. Engine can be turned off with methods described in "Pre-flight procedures and startup" section. Creating this plane was a great experience. I hope you will enjoy flying it as much as I've enjoyed building it. DOWNLOAD LINK https://kerbalx.com/EvenFlow/Wyvern-S4 Updated on 22-07-2017, V1.2 CHANGELOG: 1.0 - Inital release 1.1 - Minor tweak to the bottom part of the cowling which made the propeller assembly spontaneously detach when jumping to the craft from more than 250m, wing strake is now attached to the wing itself which prevents it from clipping awkwardly while pulling high-G maneuvers. 1.2 - Tweaks done to the page itself, part of a revamp of all of my noteworthy older creations Here's a little preview GIF too, as requested.