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Found 7 results

  1. I have found propellers won't work when partially submerged. This put a stop on creating stock boats and aquatic rovers. Here is an experiment to demonstrate: Here, propellers have it going like no one's business But here, same set up, and you're quite literally dead in the water I hope this is an oversight and not intended. Sure, water propellers are slightly different, but it's not like an airplane prop would be useless. It would be great to see this patched, so we can build stock propeller powered watercraft, for Eve, Laythe, and just on Kerbin.
  2. So someone recently challenged me to make a replica of the Quinjet from the Marvel Cinematic Universe. It is a cargo VTOL aircraft with a similar purpose to Boeing's V-22 Osprey. I wanted to make my replica unique, so I decided to make some stock electric/jet powered propellors for the VTOL function. But I've never really delved into the world of stock propellers before. So I was wondering if any of you had any tips on building them, or which design would be most appropriate (are high TWR propellors even possible)? Preferably they need to be relatively low profile, although I acknowledge that I may have to lose some aesthetics for functionality. The design for the aircraft will probably use MK3 parts although I could switch to MK2 for lower mass. Any help/criticism is welcome!
  3. I thought this might interest a few of the propeller veterans Here's a highlight I exported from last nights stream: Craft file: https://www.dropbox.com/s/dun4pe5g1xu632d/! TR6-SemiCyclicGimbal I - LiftTest.craft?dl=0 This started out as a PM with @Azimech and after some interesting ideas from @luizopiloto regarding using klaws and some TWR calculating wizardry by @SumGuy and a few others who popped up in stream, I've come up with that I might call the most ridiculous advanced full stock propeller to date. There's two main factors being used in each engine: (1)The two klaws tucked inside the cargo bays, and (2)the six klaws holding each fan blade. The klaws in the bay are used to add some extra sway to the engine while still being able to hold 250+ tons. They act as a "gimbal" of sorts letting the engine move left/right and up/down but without rotating. The klaws connected to each fan blade let the blade pivot around freely. This lets each blade change it's pitch depending on where it is in the spin cycle, tilting up when it's at the bottom and down when it's at the top like a swash plate. Since klaws don't rotate the angle of each blade is kept the same.
  4. Apparently, use of electric motors allows you to design aircraft with contra-rotating propellers- as is demonstrated in these electric racing aircraft designs: I had no idea this was possible, and this massively changes the game in terms of electric vs. internal combustion aircraft. For one, with contra-rotating electric propellers it's easily possible to pack twice as much Thrust into a given airframe as with an ICE design, allowing for higher speeds (in racing designs) ot larger wings and more space/weight for batteries (in actual utilitarian planes). It's also possible to achieve a much higher ratio of propeller-area to Thrust with the same Thrust- allowing for better performance at higher altitudes (electric engines also operate better than ICE ones at higher altitudes, due to not requiring Oxygen..) I could easily imagine an Electric passenger aircraft being designed someday with 5 sets of contra-rating propellers (1 on the nose and 2 on each wing), each with 3-4 blades rotating in each direction with a rather large propeller diameter, being used to support very high-altitude flight with electric aircraft for the inherent advantages this provides (lower drag for a given speed, less turbulence, more glide time/distance in case of engine-failure). At high altitudes electric propellers eventually reach their maximum torque and rotation-speed, and start to consume less and less electrical power as the Thrust produced and air resistance to rotation starts to fall off with even greater gains in altitude. So, if you climbed high enough you could eventually reach the point where 10 contra-rotating propellers (5 sets of 2) with large diameter blades spans and 3-4 blades on each propeller only draws as much electrical power, and produces as much Thrust, as a single propeller at sea level. However at this altitude, Drag would be greatly reduced- meaning you could (and would need to in order to generate adequate Lift to maintain altitude) fly substantially faster than that amount of Thrust would allow you to fly at sea-level. Even accounting for decreasing Lift/Drag at higher speeds, you could still cover far more miles of distance per kilowatt-hour of electrical power consumed with a design optimized for high-altitude flight and cruising at high altitude... This would lead to substantially extended max range compared to electric planes with lower cruising-altitudes, and might (just barely) allow for practical electric Transatlantic flights on a large plane (larger planes encounter less parasitic drag relative to their volume, and have less mass dedicated to cockpit computers, landing gear, and pilots compared to their payload) with a substantial portion of volume (maybe 50% of the plane's internal space) dedicated to batteries, for instance... Other videos worth watching on the topics of electric aircraft and high-altitude flight: (Above: a general overview of efforts at small electric aircraft...) (Above: a video on the development of "Alice", a proposed 800 km range passenger aircraft by Eviation...) (Above: Airbus and Rolls Royce' efforts at developing Distributed Electric Propulsion for large passenger jetliners- with company estimates putting a rollout date of about 2030-2050, target of 2042)
  5. While using them, my craft started spinning, so naturally, I wondered if I rotated it a bit, I could slow it down with the spinning. I'd also like retractable propellers for drag reasons. So, does it work? I've seen airbrakes used as wings for cruise missiles, which means they are aerodynamic, so why not propellers?
  6. Hello All! I have decided to build a propeller plane. (shamelessly stealing the technology invented by MrNuclearTurkey) (Apparently the tech isn't his either. However, the prop I used was an exact copy from his tutorial) Not just any propeller plane, a stock propeller plane. And not just any stock propeller plane either; it has four propellers, and can drop bombs! The Electrical Ellen Mk VI A My finest creation here, as shown by my video: Anyway, if you want to download this thing, I have a link on dropbox here https://www.dropbox.com/s/7id7gt4kqtlhkun/AC Electrical Ellen VI A.craft?dl=0 Instructions: 1: Decouple all the propellers from the plane 2: Hold down Alt + E on the propellers on the right, make sure they're fully powered (as shown by the roll meter on the bottom left) 3: Repeat on the left side of the plane, but with Q instead of E 4: Decouple the plane from the "Rocket Stability Enhancer" (The Big Red Supports) 5: If done correctly, the plane should lift up on it's own when reaching 50+m/s ----------- Anyway, I'd like to see your propeller planes, big or small! Thanks for reading! Passenger and cargo versions of this planr coming soon! Hopefully, not in Valve Time like how I normally post.
  7. I've been studying up on propellers for personal research and possibly modelling my own for use in KSP mods. So for those that model or have modeled propellers, I'd like to know: How did you model them? Did you use any kind of software to get the blade geometry close to accurate, or did you just make it look close enough? I know Firespitter allows for motion blurring of the blades in rotation, but I've seen it on other props that I'm not sure use Firespitter; so if it's possible to blur the blades in the rotation without Firespitter, how can it be done?