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Temperature and atmosphere on Eve and Moho in 1.0


czokletmuss
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I heard that Eve now requires only 7-8 km/s of delta-v to get into LEO

Also, I wouldn't go anywhere near Moho with nuclear engines considering their tendency to explode in 1.0.

But on the other side going to Moho requires tons of delta-v that was previously accomplished with nuclear engines so I guess Jeb has some tests/exploration to do :D

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I went there and then reverted the mission. Kerbals do not die when they step outside.

Maximum temperature I've measured using a Kerbal and alt+F12 temperature menu was almost "430". If that is in Kelvins, then not much has changed. If it's in Celsius, then Eve is now like Venus. I will send an unmanned probe to check it out.

I did notice daily temperature fluctuations, some 20 degrees difference. I guess that's new.

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Here are the results of probe "Zdenka" (yeah, I know, hilarious).

1F7AE3D6646A77B32FB6C2ADB70099484A81B859

F356EF4B381D34A30D9BD46701C788AC8A0F69F9

I don't understand these values. It's too low for kelvin. If it's celsius, then we have ourselves a new Venus. But Commissioner Tadpole's measurement on Duna suggests it's kelvins. So why such low temperature (little over 50 °C) on Eve when earlier measurement with a Kerbal was "430" and we see the thermal menu and the thermometer are the same thing.

Pressure is similar to what wiki says about Eve. Kilopascals.

Edited by lajoswinkler
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I never really paid much attention to the temperature reading before but at least according to Commissioner Tadpole's screenshot the temperature has to be measured in degree's celsius. The kelvin scale does not use the term degrees, something is just 273 Kelvin and not 273 degree's kelvin and so would not get the little degree symbol to the right of the temperature shown.

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I never really paid much attention to the temperature reading before but at least according to Commissioner Tadpole's screenshot the temperature has to be measured in degree's celsius. The kelvin scale does not use the term degrees, something is just 273 Kelvin and not 273 degree's kelvin and so would not get little degree symbol to the right of the temperature shown.

So because of a typo you concluded Duna is hot as an oven when you're baking meat.

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Temperatures in KSP is in Kelvin.

Pressure, density and temperature change with night and day.

- - - Updated - - -

So, Duna at nighttime appears to be around -40 degrees celcius.

Even during daytime (was sun high in the sky/rising/setting?) at least from that screenshot, is ~51,6 degrees celcius.

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Yeah, I've seen the temperature changes, but I took both measurements when Kerbol was roughly in the zenith. Both Kerbal and the thermometer were in the same conditions. Kerbal got to 430. I can't explain this.

Could be something about heat radiation, convection and all that. The thermal system they implemented is a pretty advanced simulation.

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Yeah, I've seen the temperature changes, but I took both measurements when Kerbol was roughly in the zenith. Both Kerbal and the thermometer were in the same conditions. Kerbal got to 430. I can't explain this.

Maybe some people finally got their wish of having part(s) that randomly fail. Just no one expected SQUAD would decide to restrict the random failures to scientific instruments...

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Yeah, I've seen the temperature changes, but I took both measurements when Kerbol was roughly in the zenith. Both Kerbal and the thermometer were in the same conditions. Kerbal got to 430. I can't explain this.

Wait, there's a difference between what temperature the thermometer MEASURES, and the temperature of a Kerbal exposed to the sun. A Kerbals thermal mass is also higher than a thermometers for instance (and the service bay in the screenshot), so it takes him/her longer to cool off. If you did this following a landing, your kerbal would be heated a bit from the capsule.

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Take a look at the Temp Ext. value for those screenshots. If that's the external temperature of the item, then it matches much more closely with what the Kerbal experienced. I think the other Temp value is the overall temperature of the item.

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Wait, there's a difference between what temperature the thermometer MEASURES, and the temperature of a Kerbal exposed to the sun. A Kerbals thermal mass is also higher than a thermometers for instance (and the service bay in the screenshot), so it takes him/her longer to cool off. If you did this following a landing, your kerbal would be heated a bit from the capsule.

No, it was almost whole Eve's day after the landing because I was checking the daily temperature fluctuation, too.

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A thermometer's "temperature" is the temperature of that part. That temperature is based off convection with the atmosphere (if there is one), outgoing blackbody radiation, and incoming radiation (background radiation from space/the atmosphere, blackbody radiation from the body under you, solar flux, and reflected solar flux from the body under you). If the thermometer is attached to another part, that temperature is also modified by conduction.

Note that a lot of factors go into that--radiative area, area exposed to the sun, area exposed to the body under you (and that body's radiative temperature and emissivity, and albedo), distance from the sun and the sun's angle, etc.

All this means that any two parts, let alone a part and a kerbal, will have different resting temperatures even at the same instant in the same environment.

The "external temperature" reported is the mean temperature of the atmosphere at that location. It is not part-specific. It is 4K (background radiation temperature) when there is no atmosphere. And yes, are in Kelvin, and they do vary by latitude and sun angle.

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