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1.0 Delta V Maps and Atmospheric Charts


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Has anyone already published a revised delta-V map or atmospheric charts for 1.0?

Or for that matter, any of the following (h/t Kerbalproof):

I'd be happy to update this post as the new versions come in. Thanks to all the community members doing all the math and calculating so the rest of us can fly easier!

New resource to the list: Meithan's Engine Charts for 1.0.2

Edited by NASAHireMe
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Well, the actual delta-v for planetary transfers etc ahsn't changed that I am aware of. The only changes are in the ascent for bodies with an atmosphere.

Haven't heard/read of any updates yet but I'll link the m here if I do.

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Here's mine, updated some numbers for 1.0.2:

V4FHldK.png

And a more simplified version:

9EaaheT.png

An important disclaimer is that ascent delta-v varies significantly based on the size and shape of your rocket.

Edit: changed maps to provide a range

Edited by metaphor
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it costs more like 3600 delta v to get to orbit. Going skimpy on the first leg of your chart is doom for anyone who follows it.

I totally agree... especially for those that don't read disclaimers. ;p

Seriously, there's nothing you can do but estimate.

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Yep, Further more 70km is not really realistic because you're on the edge on the atmo. Your orbit must be perfect not to detgrade. 75km would be much realistic.

3500 should be a minimum and 3600 more reasonable for most ships

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On the subject, can anybody recommend a way to "land" a ship on another planet? I want to try several designs so I can get an estimate of dV needed but I don't want to go land a 200 ton craft on Duna, and then a small one, and a fat one, and a slim one... and... I tired HyperEdit "magic-landing" feature but didn't seem to work for me.

I also looked at Extra Planetary Launchpads but it didn't look like it would do what I wanted to do (ie, build ships fast and "cheaty").

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On the subject, can anybody recommend a way to "land" a ship on another planet? I want to try several designs so I can get an estimate of dV needed but I don't want to go land a 200 ton craft on Duna, and then a small one, and a fat one, and a slim one... and... I tired HyperEdit "magic-landing" feature but didn't seem to work for me.

I also looked at Extra Planetary Launchpads but it didn't look like it would do what I wanted to do (ie, build ships fast and "cheaty").

If HyperEdit doesn't do it for you try landing one ship on the planet and noting its coordinates and such in the persistence file. In theory if you copy those to another craft it should end up in the same spot.

As always, backup your save before editing.

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Here's mine, updated some numbers for 1.0:

http://i.imgur.com/9vVZMxq.png

And a more simplified version:

http://i.imgur.com/fKZE4NE.png

An important disclaimer is that ascent delta-v varies significantly based on the size and shape of your rocket.

Hi, can anyone tell me why is there a Delta V between the object's transfer and capture? (E.g. 80m/s between Mun transfer and Mun capture) Are they not the same? I've seen other simpler maps which doesn't have this component.

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The capture dV is the amount of effort you must spend to stay inside the SoI after reaching it. Try going to the Mun ingame. Once you have your intercept, if you do nothing at all, you will enter the SoI, fly through it, escape it again and return to Kerbin. The only way to prevent this is running your engines somewhere inside the Mun's SoI. The best point to do this is at the periapsis, and that periapsis should be as low as possible.

So those 80 m/s are what you need to burn at a low Mun periapsis after coming out of a typical Hohmann transfer in order to stop escaping the Mun again. This amount will result in a highly elliptical orbit, with the apoapsis just short of escaping. The dV map will then have a second figure for "Mun orbit" or "Mun circularization" or some other term like that (whatever the author wants to call it), which describes the dV cost necessary to turn that highly elliptical orbit into a low circular orbit around the Mun.

Other maps may simply sum this dV cost into something else for simplicity. For example, they may only give you a transfer cost, and then a low circular orbit cost that also includes the dV required for capturing.

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Problem is that delta-v to orbit is now very dependant on how you build your rocket. A super streamlined shape with less drag won't need as much m/s to hit LKO as a lumpy brick, so it's pretty hard to have a reliable figure for that stage.

Best advice would be to make sure all maps list a probable range of ascent delta-vs from each atmospheric body (e.g. Kerbin as 3200-3600), and make it clear to players that their rocket design really matters :)

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why not add a ~ to the dV figure of atmospheric bodies, and a disclaimer in the bottom right hand corner saying that the figure will vary by as much as (for example) 10% in either direction depending on the design of the rocket and the ascent profile?

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The capture dV is the amount of effort you must spend to stay inside the SoI after reaching it. Try going to the Mun ingame. Once you have your intercept, if you do nothing at all, you will enter the SoI, fly through it, escape it again and return to Kerbin. The only way to prevent this is running your engines somewhere inside the Mun's SoI. The best point to do this is at the periapsis, and that periapsis should be as low as possible.

So those 80 m/s are what you need to burn at a low Mun periapsis after coming out of a typical Hohmann transfer in order to stop escaping the Mun again. This amount will result in a highly elliptical orbit, with the apoapsis just short of escaping. The dV map will then have a second figure for "Mun orbit" or "Mun circularization" or some other term like that (whatever the author wants to call it), which describes the dV cost necessary to turn that highly elliptical orbit into a low circular orbit around the Mun.

Other maps may simply sum this dV cost into something else for simplicity. For example, they may only give you a transfer cost, and then a low circular orbit cost that also includes the dV required for capturing.

That is a great explanation, Thanks!

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Best advice would be to make sure all maps list a probable range of ascent delta-vs from each atmospheric body (e.g. Kerbin as 3200-3600), and make it clear to players that their rocket design really matters :)

Giving a range is a good idea.

Here's some new charts with a range of values:

V4FHldK.png

9EaaheT.png

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hey metaphor

thank you for your work.

At least for me it's invaluable, I always consult it, when building interstellar ships.

Until yesterday though I used the old one with Kerbin value of 4500 m/s and was sooo proud of myself for only for just needing about 4000 m/s... I thought I was a good Kerbalengineer and pilot, well, that's how you crush peoples dreams... ;.;

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