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https://starlinerupdates.com/boeing-works-to-open-starliner-valves-determine-cause-of-valve-issues/

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Boeing Works to Open Starliner Valves, Determine Cause of Valve Issues

August 12, 2021

As Boeing teams continue to work around the clock to return functionality to a number of oxidizer valves on the CST-100 Starliner’s propulsion system, the company is simultaneously working with its NASA and Aerojet Rocketdyne partners to determine the cause of the valve issues discovered during prelaunch checks.

Nine of the previously affected 13 valves are now open and functioning normally after the application of electrical and thermal techniques to prompt and command them open. Similar techniques are now being applied to the four valves that remain closed.

“Over the past couple of days, our team has taken the necessary time to safely access and test the affected valves, and not let the launch window dictate our pace,” said John Vollmer, Starliner vice president and program manager.

The company will work with NASA and United Launch Alliance to confirm a new launch date when the spacecraft is ready.

 

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http://www.parabolicarc.com/2019/06/20/boeing-spacex-continue-work-technical-challenges-commercial-crew/

This is from 2 years ago referencing a GAO report from 2 years ago ^^^^

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The GAO report also includes additional details on a failure Boeing experienced with  in June 2018 resulted in a 12-month delay in its launch abort propulsion system testing.

During a test firing, four of the eight total valves in the four launch abort engines failed to close after a shutdown command was sent,” the report stated. “In response to this event, Boeing initiated an investigation to identify the root cause.

Seems troubling that they are still having valve issues.

Some of the recent problem apparently arose because of a harness getting wet per a NSF post (unsure on the actual source, but it tracks what I have heard about rain getting in from a cover that was not on right). Still, seems like a more complex issue than that if they have been working this issue for 2 years.

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Just now, tater said:

This will be delayed until they get the thing back in the barn, and figure out the root cause. Then they have to mesh with ULA and ISS scheduling.

Unless NASA does a lot of rescheduling to make this fit in, I'm now sure it will go after Lucy

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Seems like they have a decent candidate for problems.

42 minutes ago, Beccab said:

Unless NASA does a lot of rescheduling to make this fit in, I'm now sure it will go after Lucy

"Definitely after Lucy"

 

 

 

 

Moisture in vale was atmospheric moisture, not rain intrusion.

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On 8/13/2021 at 10:18 AM, tater said:

Seems like they have a decent candidate for problems.

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Vollmer: seeing some permeation of NTO into the seals of the valve creating corrosion and stiction.

 

O.K. I can imagine that this might not have been a problem if starliner hadn't spent the extra days on the launchpad while being fully fueled - this time. (If this actually is the problem etc.) But a spaceship that's supposed to stay in space for a few months before returning to Earth should have a fuel system that doesn't corrode that easily.

 

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Most of the brains have gone to SpaceX. Boeing is suffering.

I don't think that the problem is the availability of good engineers. But you have to allow them to do the job properly, which includes full scale testing, which in turn costs quite a bit of money...

Edited by Vanamonde
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On 8/14/2021 at 2:57 AM, AHHans said:

But a spaceship that's supposed to stay in space for a few months before returning to Earth should have a fuel system that doesn't corrode that easily.

They hope, there are no rains in space, cuz they fly above clouds.

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Most of the brains have gone to SpaceX. Boeing is suffering.

Previously...

Spoiler

0cbgmxoirsro64x3tb2qsgttax8.gif

 

Edited by Vanamonde
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25 minutes ago, kerbiloid said:

Previously...

  Reveal hidden contents

0cbgmxoirsro64x3tb2qsgttax8.gif

 

Wow, a test to destruction ended in destruction, who could have guessed? They have since redesigned the propulsion system, and flown how many operational missions? Meanwhile, Boeing stretched the definition of success on their pad abort when one of the engines cut off early and a parachute fell off. Then they called OFT-1 a success because it landed in one piece, and now they can't even launch a second flight that shouldn't have even been needed because of something that frankly should have been caught by now. 

There's something to be said about goalposts being moved and such, but Boeing is moving their goalposts in the opposite direction. They managed to go from a "mostly good" pad abort, to a failed orbital mission, to can't even launch. 

Edited by .50calBMG
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42 minutes ago, kerbiloid said:

They hope, there are no rains in space, cuz they fly above clouds.

Previously...

  Reveal hidden contents

0cbgmxoirsro64x3tb2qsgttax8.gif

 

How the <words I can't use> do you manage to consistently steer every discussion even remotely related into one of your 'spacex bad' arguments?

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2 minutes ago, OrdinaryKerman said:

How the <words I can't use> do you manage to consistently steer every discussion even remotely related into one of your 'spacex bad' arguments?

?
I even didn't started, do you read my quotes?

***

Of course, a wet Starliner is a shame, while the exploded wet Dragon is nothing special.

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Just now, kerbiloid said:

It was a normal post-flight ignition test, but the engine pipes appeared to be wet.

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Evidence shows that a leaking component allowed liquid oxidizer – nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) – to enter high-pressure helium tubes during ground processing. A slug of this NTO was driven through a helium check valve at high speed during rapid initialization of the launch escape system, resulting in structural failure within the check valve. The failure of the titanium component in a high-pressure NTO environment was sufficient to cause ignition of the check valve and led to an explosion.   (https://web.archive.org/web/20190718220856/https://www.spacex.com/news/2019/07/15/update-flight-abort-static-fire-anomaly-investigation)

It was a valve problem, but had nothing to do with water ingestion.

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SpaceX has already initiated several actions, such as eliminating any flow path within the launch escape system for liquid propellant to enter the gaseous pressurization system. Instead of check valves, which typically allow liquid to flow in only one direction, burst disks, which seal completely until opened by high pressure, will mitigate the risk entirely. Thorough testing and analysis of these mitigations has already begun in close coordination with NASA, and will be completed well in advance of future flights.

They already fixed it.

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2 minutes ago, OrdinaryKerman said:

It was a valve problem, but had nothing to do with water ingestion.

That time they wrote that the valve problem was caused by the contact with seawater.

2 minutes ago, OrdinaryKerman said:

They already fixed it.

And they will fix this.

***

We have Scott Manley about that

Spoiler

 

 

Edited by kerbiloid
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