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[1.12.3] Bluedog Design Bureau - Stockalike Saturn, Apollo, and more! (v1.10.3 "Луна" 17/June/2022)


CobaltWolf
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Just a heads up to anyone who may notice, the Mariner 2/Mariner 10 real names have been from to ‘Wayfarer’ to ‘Argo’ (the name of Mariner in Coatl) in anticipation of the upcoming Mariner 3-5 parts and some other stuff in the works. The ‘Wayfarer’ name will be reserved for Voyager when I get to those parts in the future.

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29 minutes ago, Invaderchaos said:

Just a heads up to anyone who may notice, the Mariner 2/Mariner 10 real names have been from to ‘Wayfarer’ to ‘Argo’ (the name of Mariner in Coatl) in anticipation of the upcoming Mariner 3-5 parts and some other stuff in the works. The ‘Wayfarer’ name will be reserved for Voyager when I get to those parts in the future.

Is the BDB x Coatl partnership official? :P

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33 minutes ago, Beccab said:

The real Voyager or the cancelled Mars Voyager?

I’m referring to the real Voyager. I think we plan on doing the later at some point, but it will not be me who does it

7 minutes ago, Entr8899 said:

Is the BDB x Coatl partnership official? :P

We have some collaboration planned. Details are to be revealed later.

Edited by Invaderchaos
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1 hour ago, Invaderchaos said:

I’m referring to the real Voyager. I think we plan on doing the later at some point, but it will not be me who does it

We have some collaboration planned. Details are to be revealed later.

This is exciting, a bdb style voyager probe is sure to be amazing! the two voyager probes have been drifting through space for 40 years now, and we still have contact! these two probes were designed to last 5 years at most I believe. 

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1 minute ago, TheLoneOne said:

This is exciting, a bdb style voyager probe is sure to be amazing! the two voyager probes have been drifting through space for 40 years now, and we still have contact! these two probes were designed to last 5 years at most I believe. 

Sadly last I heard those 2 probes are dying. To be fair they lasted 40 years which is a remarkable feat.

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3 hours ago, MikoYurei said:

Wery good-looking lv! I also build the Saturn-Shuttle, but using CA parts, not SOCKscreenshot1324.png

nice! only reason I don't use CA is because the textures are less detailed but that launcher looks great!

Just now, Pudgemountain said:

Sadly last I heard those 2 probes are dying. To be fair they lasted 40 years which is a remarkable feat.

they might have till 2030 tho. thats when the rtgs will be too weak for coms power

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18 minutes ago, Pudgemountain said:

Sadly last I heard those 2 probes are dying. To be fair they lasted 40 years which is a remarkable feat.

There were a bunch of inaccurate articles going around recently. As power drops instruments are slowly powered down. Its a continuous process and the Voyagers are still estimated to keep going with active comms till around 2030 iirc. Someone wrote an article after hearing something was being powered down and as is typical these days most articles regurgitate other news instead of checking things themselves.

Edited by Zorg
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43 minutes ago, Zorg said:

There were a bunch of inaccurate articles going around recently. As power drops instruments are slowly powered down. Its a continuous process and the Voyagers are still estimated to keep going with active comms till around 2030 iirc. Someone wrote an article after hearing something was being powered down and as is typical these days most articles regurgitate other news instead of checking things themselves.

zorg would you argue that  the voyger probes were the best probes design reliability wise ever produced? (given the conditions they are subjected to and the time its been)

 

Edited by TheLoneOne
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8 minutes ago, TheLoneOne said:

zorg would you argue that  the voyger probes were the best probes design reliability wise ever produced? (given the conditions they are subjected to and the time its been)

 

I'm not the probe expert here but its hard to argue otherwise right? Nothing else has quite proven itself in those kind of conditions for so long.

Edited by Zorg
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2 minutes ago, Zorg said:

I'm not the probe expert here but its hard to argue otherwise right? Nothing else has quite proven itself in those kind of conditions for so long.

makes me almost want to see a mission with a dedicated interstellar probe where they use like a bunch of ion engines as a kick stage launched on an sls,  but alas that would be too expensive probably for them to want to do.

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1 hour ago, Transformatron said:

Did a fresh install and the Saturn I works now, but I was exploring the new craft files, why does MLV-V/4-260 have random S-IVB tanks on the SRBs?

I read somewhere (probably the original study) that they put fuel tanks on the SRBs to help lessen the load on the core tanks; I'd assume you'd put a fuel line between the SRB to the core and it will use up the liquid fuel in the SRB before/at booster separation.

ED: Astronautix link about it, which mentions liquid fuel tanks on SRBs http://www.astronautix.com/s/saturnv4-260.html

Edited by bigyihsuan
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3 hours ago, TheLoneOne said:

zorg would you argue that  the voyger probes were the best probes design reliability wise ever produced? (given the conditions they are subjected to and the time its been)

 

Pioneer 6, 7, 8 (launched in 65, 66, and 67 respectively) were still in a partial operational state in the late 90's and Pioneer 6 had successful telemetry contact in 2000. 6 held the record for the oldest operating probe untill beaten by voyager 2 in 2012, with contact with those 3 probes (9 was unable to be contacted in 87) believed to still be possible, but none being attempted.

1 hour ago, Transformatron said:

Did a fresh install and the Saturn I works now, but I was exploring the new craft files, why does MLV-V/4-260 have random S-IVB tanks on the SRBs?unknown.png

MLV V /4-260 was designed with cross-feed in mind with main engines and strapons lit at launch and auxiliary fuel tanks drained at SRB separation (the fairing is hammerheaded which is why it looks weird). the S-IVB tanks are about the right size and serve as a suitable stand-in, but should be set to liquid fuel and oxidizer with fuel level adjusted to match burn time.

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Edited by Jcking
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6 hours ago, Zorg said:

I'm not the probe expert here but its hard to argue otherwise right? Nothing else has quite proven itself in those kind of conditions for so long.

There's Opportunity on Mars that comes close. Built for a 3 month mission, lasted 15 years. Of course, can't really compare the two. One is on a planet, the other is in space, but length wise, they both gave us amazing journeys. 

3 hours ago, JustDark said:

 

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Where'd you get those folding back SLA panels with the solar panels? :o

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Skylab 5 Part 2:

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Thirty days into Skylab 5's mission, the two mission specialists exit the station for what would be the station's longest EVA to date. In addition to routine servicing of the Apollo Telescope Mount, the astronauts would install a series of external fixtures to the station in preparation for its mothballing following their mission's end. Most of these pieces to be worked on had arrived with the AARDV, either stored inside the pressurized cargo space or attached via external racks.

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The first task of the spacewalk was a familiar one: retrieving the last of the film cassettes from the ATM. Some film was still unused by this point, but to prevent it from degrading over the course of the station's decommissioning it would be returned to Earth all the same.

Also note the special headlamps worn by the crewmembers here. Having also been carried to the station onboard Aardvark 2, they are seeing use for the first time due to the extended length of this EVA. Improved versions are being developed for use with the Shuttle and its EMU spacesuit.

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With the ATM emptied and secured for its hibernation, the astronauts turn to the next task at hand. Among the pieces to be installed on the station, three will be easily visible on the exterior. The first is a remotely-controlled television camera and illuminator, to be used for observing the station's exterior in the absence of crew as well as to record future EVAs from the station. For this dual purpose it it position near the station airlock where it can view spacewalkers entering and leaving the station.

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The second piece on the list is actually a pair of radio transponders, intended to guide in future unmanned vehicles approaching the station. While not strictly necessary for the station's preservation, the system will enable future Aardvarks to perform more efficient and reliable rendezvous and approaches, as well as direct servicing tugs like the TRS being developed for interim orbital boosting. One antenna is attached to each side of the Multiple Docking Adapter.

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The final addition for today is an array of batteries intended to bolster Skylab's electrical system and provide insurance should any of its current electrical fixtures fail. This is only a short term solution, however, and the station's power generation will eventually have to be expanded outright if Skylab is to continue to see service into the 1980s. These batteries are attached to the zenith of the MDA, underneath the ATM structure.

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With the newly installed television camera operating, the crew move on to smaller repairs and installations around the MDA and airlock module. Any unexpected degradation in hardware which cannot be immediately addressed is catalogued and worked into the Skylab 6 mission itinerary.

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Altogether the EVA lasts some two hours, leaving both participants exhausted. The final ten days aboard the station will be much slower, however, and the astronauts aboard will have plenty of time to enjoy their stay as the last occupants of Skylab for the near future.

 

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One day before the crew's return, Aardvark 2 is unberthed and deorbited. It reenters the atmosphere and burns up over the Pacific Ocean hours later.

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Before leaving the crew photographs the inside of the station, mostly to prove that they did clean up after themselves, despite whatever the next crew to visit might claim.

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After undocking, the crew will spend a day in free flight, testing the Apollo Block III hardware and assessing its ability to operate independently of a station after an extended stay on orbit. Compared to the last forty days aboard, however, the crew find themselves with little to do and soon resort to photographing the Earth for leisure.

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Reentry occurred as planned until shortly before landing, when the crew was inadvertently exposed to toxic hydrazine fumes caused by unignited RCS propellant venting from the command module and being sucked in by a cabin air intake. Although some anti-capsule proponents in Houston were quick to denounce the incident as proof of the inadequacy of the aging Apollo hardware, it was soon determined to be the result of human error. The crew had accidentally left the RCS on after parachute deployment, and were exposed to the exhaust fumes as the cabin drew in outside air. The crew and spacecraft were retrieved by the USS New Orleans and transported to Hawaii. The astronauts were hospitalized for two weeks in Honolulu, but soon made a full recovery.

 

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5 hours ago, Transformatron said:

Did a fresh install and the Saturn I works now, but I was exploring the new craft files, why does MLV-V/4-260 have random S-IVB tanks on the SRBs?unknown.png

Sort-of.   The AJ-260 is too short to reach the upper interestage of the S-IC stage... and the 3x AJ-260 would burn to long making the S-IC stage nearly superfluous.  So instead, they used the 2x AJ-260 length (the long length we have in BDB) and added an addendum LFO tank on top of it to create the structural connection to the structural top of the S-IC... and provide a little more fuel and thus burn time to the S-IC stage.

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