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[1.12.3] Bluedog Design Bureau - Stockalike Saturn, Apollo, and more! (v1.11.0 "вне" 22/Oct/2022)


CobaltWolf
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8 hours ago, GoldForest said:

Right, forgot about that. Cassic assumes a natural kerbin, right? So yeah. @BNSF1995 Definitely switch to PVG. 

this dudes issue exemplify why you should always have learned manual turns just in case automation fails you, you dont have to be amazing at it, but learn it well enough that you could probably salvage a situation where mecjeb refuses to cooperate at around 15k meters

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2 hours ago, CollectingSP said:

Quick question- I’m seeing DSCS and GPS sats on the wiki.

are these in the mod yet or are they kitbashed?

sorry, it’s been a while since I’ve kept up with the development.

edit- I see these are built with NFE and other parts. My bad.

And annoyingly I nuked that install before remembering to backup all the craft files, so now I have the great delight of doing them all again, hopefully better this time!

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1 minute ago, Friznit said:

And annoyingly I nuked that install before remembering to backup all the craft files, so now I have the great delight of doing them all again, hopefully better this time!

fitting profile picture for a person who nuked his install

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10 hours ago, GoldForest said:

The part with the RS-25s? 

Saturn IB interstage
Saturn S4B to adapter (Set to 3.75 I think)
SOCK engine mount (Part clipped up into the S4B adapter to make it look like it was naturally tapering somewhat)

thanks you answered my question

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12 hours ago, GoldForest said:

Right, forgot about that. Cassic assumes a natural kerbin, right? So yeah. @BNSF1995 Definitely switch to PVG. 

I just tried PVG and...

It worked. I managed to put a Saturn I with a BP Apollo into a 165x164 orbit at a 32.5 degree inclination. And best of all, it did so realistically without coasting to the circularization burn. Just burned the whole way up.

Thanks for the assistance!

Edited by BNSF1995
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3 hours ago, Friznit said:

That's what happens when @Pappystein catches you launching two Saturn C8 Nova rockets after quoting Wikipedia.

Gah!  They all conspire against me!    I don't get no respect!  I tell yah!

:P

26 minutes ago, BNSF1995 said:

I just tried PVG and...

It worked. I managed to put a Saturn I with a BP Apollo into a 165x164 orbit at a 32.5 degree inclination. And best of all, it did so realistically without coasting to the circularization burn. Just burned the whole way up.

Thanks for the assistance!

Awesome!   Welcome to orbiting the craziest Rocket NASA ever flew!.... Until the Ares X test

 

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On 2/2/2022 at 6:09 PM, CobaltWolf said:

I can't believe I actually made this extremely blursed part...

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are you going to make a texture variant for this to go with the shield variant for the shuttle style Kane command pod? 

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Apollo 19, Part 1: The Final Act:

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It is December, 1973. For the last four years, manned missions have departed for lunar space on an average of every six months. With each mission to the Moon's barren surface, the limits have been pushed, the standards have been raised, and the extent of our knowledge has been expanded. Some of the most incredible building projects in history have been organized just to see this program to completion, from the massive Vertical Assembly Building at Cape Canaveral, to the sprawling factories across the country used for construction of the great Saturn moon rockets and their payloads, to the global network of tracking stations to ensure a steady connection with the crew of a spacecraft thousands of times further away from home than any previous explorers. Manned lunar exploration itself has seen growth few had ever imagined during the eight landings. The ghostly black-and-white images of Apollo 11's single moonwalk have given way to crisp high-definition color television, controlled live by a technician on the ground, recording the astronauts of later landings as they traverse the picturesque landscapes of lunar mountains, collapsed lava tubes, and craters the size of small cities. The role of the third member of an Apollo crew, at first regarded as something of an afterthought or a necessary odd-man-out, has evolved into that of a unique lunar explorer in his own right, operating a ship with an entire suite of specialized scientific instruments for studying the Moon in ways that his comrades on the surface simply cannot. For all the magnificent advances of Apollo, however, it must come to an end eventually. Apollo 19 will be the last manned mission to the lunar surface for the foreseeable future. The plans prepared for American spaceflight in the 1970s and 1980s are much more limited in scale, focusing on long but frequent stays in low Earth orbit. At first, this goal is to be pursued through surplus Apollo hardware, consisting of the Skylab space station and the three Apollo spacecraft and boosters set aside for its crews. Soon, however, this will give way to two avenues of advancement; the first taking the form of purpose-built Apollo hardware such as the Block III command module and Saturn IC booster, the second coming later in as a reusable spacecraft known as the space shuttle. While the majority of NASA prepares itself for a decade of asceticism and frugality, however, a small but dedicated team of technicians, astronauts, flight controllers, and other specialists focus on ensuring that the final lunar landing embodies everything that Apollo was meant to represent...

 

The landing site for Apollo's final mission is Hyginus Crater, a small but fascinating feature located in the region of the Moon known as Sinus Medii. Two features cause Hyginus to stand out to site planners and geologists: first, the sinuous rille which bisects the crater running roughly northwest to southeast, and second, the noticeable absence of a raised rim and rays of ejecta which would both be typical of an impact crater. Clearly, it was no asteroid that formed Hyginus, in fact the feature is much more like a caldera; the remnant of a magma chamber after it has been emptied out and collapsed during a volcanic event. For most of the Apollo program the search for evidence of lunar volcanism has been the primary motivator for landing site selection, and if scientists' suspicions about the Hyginus formation are correct, it could represent the holy grail of volcanic activity on the Moon, the perfect capstone to end Apollo's already stellar legacy.

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In spite of the dwindling Apollo program and the downsizing throughout NASA, the launch cadence at the Cape is unusually rapid. In addition to the regular commercial satellite launches on Delta and Atlas rockets and the military payloads on Titan III, both pads at LC-39 are occupied for the first time in history. While Apollo 19 finishes the last of its launch preparations at Pad 39B, the Skylab space station arrives at Pad 39A atop its own Saturn V for check-outs and dress rehearsals in preparation for its launch early next year. Those with a dryer sense of humor have noted that in this image of the last two first-generation Saturns there is enough potential energy to rival the Hiroshima atomic bomb. Not that anyone cares to find out...

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The launch date's position at the end of the year requires a night launch, the second of a Saturn V. Tens of thousands of spectators brave the chilly December weather, crowding the causeways at CCAFS and the shores of nearby Titusville and Cocoa Beach to see the final moonship lumber skyward on a tower of flame.

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Aside from the unusual hour of liftoff, the launch of Apollo 19 proceeds as smoothly as ever, rounding out the Saturn V's lunar launch history with a perfect record.

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Once safely through the Van Allen Belts, the command module Bonhomme Richard retrieves the lunar module Spirit and battens down for its three day flight to lunar orbit.

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Bonhomme Richard carries a unique SIM loadout, consisting of a mix of instruments from the previous two configurations. The mapping radar flown on Apollo 17 and 18 has been replaced with a more compact camera system allowing for more thorough ultraviolet and infrared imaging of the Moon, while the microwave and mass spectrometers flown on Apollo 15 and 16 have been reinstalled for the final flight. A trapped radiation detector has also been packaged in the SIM Bay, along with a radiation test package which will be collected via EVA at the mission's conclusion. An RPWS antenna has been included as well, although the experiment broke early into the flight and no meaningful data was retrieved from it. Apollo 19 will also perform the doppler tracking experiment from Apollo 18, although the antenna has been moved to a more optimized position on Bonhomme Richard's service module.

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One day after arriving in lunar orbit, Spirit undocks and prepares for Apollo's final descent to the Moon.

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The approach to Hyginus is almost stupidly simple compared to landing sites like Hadley Rille and Tsiolkovsky, and the LM touches down southeast of the crater as though it were child's play.

 

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For this final flight, the crew has brought the rover's GCTV assembly inside the LM with them, allowing the filming of the mission's first steps from outside the front hatch. Once on the surface, it will be mounted to the LRV and used as normal.

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The area around Hyginus bears much resemblance to the mare terrain at Tranquility Base and Surveyor Crater, with flat expanses and distant hills.

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While the LRV is deployed, the TV camera is temporarily mounted on a tripod to capture the procedure.

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It then assumes its normal place in front of the rover's passenger seat.

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With the rover unpacked and engaged, the crew begin to unpack the special equipment for their explorations, including the reference gnomon for allowing accurate color-calibration of developed photographs...

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...the Solar Wind Composition Experiment, designed to collect the sparse particles emitted by the sun on a foil sail for return to Earth...

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...and the Apollo Ultraviolet Telescope, which is to be deployed in the shadow of the lunar module to capture long-exposure photographs of the sky throughout the mission, such as the photograph seen below.

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Next, the crew begins erecting the ALSEP at a suitable location about one hundred meters southwest of the LM. This is the most diverse ALSEP yet flown to the lunar surface, with a number of unique experiments not performed on any prior landing, such as...

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...the Heat Flow Experiment, designed to measure the subsurface temperature of the lunar surface through two probes inserted via drill. Thankfully, this model seems to be wireless, otherwise one of the astronauts might trip over the power cord connecting the experiment to the central station.

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Additionally, the ALSEP features the Lunar Ejecta And Micrometeoroids Experiment, the Lunar Surface Magnetometer, and the Active Seismic Experiment, all of which draw their electrical power from a single RTG.

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It was at this point I realized (embarrassingly later than I should have) that the SWC and ultraviolet telescope counted as BG experiments and needed to be within range of a central station to work, so I moved them over here too. Realistically, however, these experiments were set up much closer to the LM. Literally unplayable.

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With the ALSEP activated, the astronauts return to the LM to raise the ninth and final American flag on the lunar surface.

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Following this, they embark on today's geological trek; a somewhat-freeform excursion around the mare to the south of the landing site. While not nearly as interesting as the crater and rille to the north, studying the mare with the enhanced capability that a J-mission affords will allow scientists to compare the findings of this mission to those of previous mare landings such as Apollo 12.

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After a two-hour traverse, the crew returns to Spirit to conclude their first EVA. Throughout the next two days, they will explore the crater and rille more closely, as their comrade in orbit continues his observations.

 

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7 hours ago, BNSF1995 said:

I just tried PVG and...

It worked. I managed to put a Saturn I with a BP Apollo into a 165x164 orbit at a 32.5 degree inclination. And best of all, it did so realistically without coasting to the circularization burn. Just burned the whole way up.

Thanks for the assistance!

He, don't thanks me, thank Zorg. He's the one that figured out you were using the wrong flight profile system.

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On 3/31/2022 at 12:43 AM, Invaderchaos said:

Might not have mentioned it here, but I actually have been planning to totally redo Atlas V/later centaur. Not sure when this is gonna start but I’ll likely be my next big project.


also, extremely WIP, but I’m making a shuttle-blanket inspired/modern style texture variant for the CM:

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no normals yet.

You know that AU roleplay I mentioned?

This has found a place in it. My idea is that, in 1981, NASA introduces a new fleet of reusable Apollo capsules. Among the new features is thermal tiles, to allow NASA to reuse the capsules. Eventually, this fleet of reusable capsules is comprised of eight capsules, each built and introduced into service as the stock of one-use capsules dwindles:

  • Columbia, introduced in 1981
  • Challenger, introduced in 1983
  • Discovery, introduced in 1984
  • Atlantis, introduced in 1985
  • Enterprise, introduced in 1987
  • Endeavor, introduced in 1992
  • Mayflower, introduced in 1995
  • Constitution, introduced in 2001

ColumbiaDiscovery, and Enterprise are exclusively used for Lunar flights in support of Altair Base and Space Station Artemis (a wet workshop Skylab), Challenger, Atlantis, and Endeavor are exclusively used for Earth orbital flights in both the Apollo program and whatever space station program NASA has going (when the reusable capsules were introduced, the program was the second-generation Skylab known as "Olympus", followed by Space Station Freedom in 1988 and the International Space Station in 2005), and Mayflower and Constitution are used exclusively by the Air Force and Department of Defense for a military program called Watchtower, which services military satellites, rotates crew to and from a classified military space station, and servicing the "Missile Shield" (AKA the Strategic Defense Initiative).

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18 hours ago, Galileo chiu said:

oh, can we have a craft file just for the launch vehicle?

https://www.dropbox.com/s/dh6orscnm4avlq5/Apollo Saturn Side Shuttle.rar?dl=0

There are three different saves:

Apollo - Saturn Side Shuttle w_ Launch pad requires:
BDB's latest Dev branch
SOCK
Restock
Cormorant
Modular Launch Pads

Apollo - Saturn Side Shuttle w_o Launch pad 'n cormorant srb sep boosters requires:
BDB's latest dev branch
SOCK
Restock

Apollo - Saturn Side Shuttle w_o Launch pad requires:
BDB's latest dev branch
SOCK
Restock

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19 hours ago, GoldForest said:

Can we get a screenshot of your gamedata folder and BDB folder? 

Appreciate the interest. As weird as it seems to me, I've narrowed this down to being a conflict with another mod(s). I have two installs right now with binary identical copies of BDB, B9, and CRP, same KSP version. The SIV-B IU works on one, but not the other.  At some point I'll muster the motivation to narrow down the differences between these installs - there are lots of parts. 

In the meantime, just out of curiosity, do you have Harmony installed?

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14 hours ago, chaos113 said:

are you going to make a texture variant for this to go with the shield variant for the shuttle style Kane command pod? 

Invader asked me about the texture for the feetshield so I assume yes

 

17 minutes ago, guest10985 said:

Hello,

I'm having trouble installing the  latest dev branch. Every time I boot up ksp MM gets 3 errors(all from bdb). Can anyone help  

What errors? That's not a lot of information to go on.

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1 hour ago, OrbitalManeuvers said:

Appreciate the interest. As weird as it seems to me, I've narrowed this down to being a conflict with another mod(s). I have two installs right now with binary identical copies of BDB, B9, and CRP, same KSP version. The SIV-B IU works on one, but not the other.  At some point I'll muster the motivation to narrow down the differences between these installs - there are lots of parts. 

In the meantime, just out of curiosity, do you have Harmony installed?

Idk, kind of have forgotten all the mods I have installed. My main ksp save is on my laptop and I don't feel like getting it out right now. 

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On 4/1/2022 at 1:29 AM, Invaderchaos said:

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v1.10.0 "тролл"

New Content and Features
- Pioneer Venus (finally)

As LATAMer, i'd take that announce like it was... BUT, when can we have Pioneer Venus on our installs?! :P

Edited by Yuriy Istochnikov
grammar
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6 minutes ago, CobaltWolf said:

Invader asked me about the texture for the feetshield so I assume yes

 

What errors? That's not a lot of information to go on.

MM is saying, "1 error related to GameData/Bluedog_DB/Parts/Apollo/Paint/BP/paint.cfg,  1 error related to GameData/Bluedog_DB/Parts/Apollo/Paint/Skylab/paint.cfg, 1 error related to GameData/Bluedog_DB/Parts/Apollo/Paint/White/paint/cfg"

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@Zorg

If you don't mind me asking I have a question regarding the Skylab revamp development.

Would it be possible to eventually add a part switch that allows each of the workshops to switch between the orbital and interplanetary shielding?

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58 minutes ago, 1124max said:

@Zorg

If you don't mind me asking I have a question regarding the Skylab revamp development.

Would it be possible to eventually add a part switch that allows each of the workshops to switch between the orbital and interplanetary shielding?

er let me think about that.

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1 hour ago, guest10985 said:

MM is saying, "1 error related to GameData/Bluedog_DB/Parts/Apollo/Paint/BP/paint.cfg,  1 error related to GameData/Bluedog_DB/Parts/Apollo/Paint/Skylab/paint.cfg, 1 error related to GameData/Bluedog_DB/Parts/Apollo/Paint/White/paint/cfg"

Seconded. I am also getting these errors when I upgraded yesterday.

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