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[1.12.5] Bluedog Design Bureau - Stockalike Saturn, Apollo, and more! (v1.12.0 "Песок" 13/Jan/2023)


CobaltWolf
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43 minutes ago, Pappystein said:

Sorry for the double quote.  But something popped into my head about the "Triple Layer Mylar"     the D.1A also has that I believe.      Remember D.1A and D.1T were supposed to be identical except for the jettisonable insulation in the case of D.1A as it was not under a PLF.

D.1 (the first generation Centaur) Did NOT have this insulation.

I do recall seeing D1T having additional MLI insulation somewhere but I cant find the source. Not a 100% sure though. Perhaps it meant in addition to D1 only

40 minutes ago, OrbitalManeuvers said:

Maybe everyone already knows what this is but me, but here goes ... is this "just" solar panels? Is there another source of EC generation? Is there EC storage?

Its just solar panels. Im going to configure the structure with large EC storage and maybe a probe core.

14 minutes ago, pTrevTrevs said:

Are those APAS-75 docking ports? Would that system have been used if the shuttle were flying missions involving docking earlier, or would a new system have been developed like was done for Shuttle-Mir and ISS?

Yes its APAS 75. The assumption at the time was that the APAS 75 would be the androgynous port of the future. As it turned out it ended up being APAS 89 but its reasonable to assume APAS 75 would have been a usable option if things had moved ahead earlier following its success in ASTP.

Here's a closer look at the adaptor module im taking inspiration from. A similar thing is also there in the first picture in my previous post also with APAS 75. We're not going to have the telescoping sections and rotating ports etc since thats not really practical without robotics and I dont want to get into all of that for a docking node.

Image

Edited by Zorg
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1 hour ago, pTrevTrevs said:

Are those APAS-75 docking ports? Would that system have been used if the shuttle were flying missions involving docking earlier, or would a new system have been developed like was done for Shuttle-Mir and ISS?

APAS-75 Ports appear in the illustrations, as well as in various proposed space stations and IPP stuff at the time. However it seems to me that they were more representative or an option for an androgynous docking port, and that the Shuttle or these other vehicles would have used an entirely different design as several are depicted with an entirely new design in conjunction and with APAS-75.

Edited by Jcking
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10 hours ago, bjornadri said:

hey it's me again, sorry for being bothersome and i don't know if this is a known bug, but the periscope on the hermes capsule is automatically opening on selecting the capsule, with no button to close it in the right-click menu. thanks in advance!

Do you have the Comfortable Landing mod installed? I tried it once and had that exact problem. I uninstalled CL and it went away. I really don’t think this is a BDB problem. 
 

@CobaltWolf, FYI here.

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Which of the BDB ALSEP experiments correspond to the real experiments? Some of them are obvious but a few are not (e.g. the "Advanced Gravioli Detector"). In particular, I'm not sure what corresponds to the Cold Cathode Gauge Experiment, the Lunar Atmosphere Compositon Experiment, the Lunar Seismic Profiling Experiment, and the Passive Seismic Experiment Package.

Edited by septemberWaves
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Skylab 2: We Fix Anything!

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May, 1974: After a month of delays the Skylab 2 mission is finally given the green-light under a revised mission schedule. Rather than the 30-day mission originally planned prior to the accident, Skylab 2 will now perform a 20-day stay aboard the station performing repairs and running checkouts on the systems, in addition to demonstrating the experiment techniques which will be used by later flights. For the first time since 1968, a Saturn IB soars into the sky, the first one to launch from Kennedy Space Center. Commanding this mission is Melcas Kerman, veteran of both the Gemini 10/Centaur-MOL and the Apollo 12 flights. Uniquely experienced with both long-duration spaceflight and the Apollo hardware from these two flights, he is unquestionably the best-suited astronaut to lead this mission. Centaur-MOL was an extremely primitive station compared to Skylab, lacking such amenities as a shower, toilet, or individual sleeping quarters, as well as requiring its crew to enter the station via a treacherous spacewalk from their Gemini capsule to a crude inflatable airlock. Nevertheless, it allowed the Gemini 10 flight to remain in orbit for thirty days; a record which has remained unbroken and unchallenged, until Skylab, that is...

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The crew reports that, compared to the Saturn V, the first-stage flight of the Saturn IB is astonishingly smooth, with fewer G's and less vibration.

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Tracking cameras follow the vehicle as it ascends into orbit, following a much steeper trajectory than the Saturn V.

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The spacecraft separates from its S-IVB second stage shortly after reaching orbit, however the stationkeeping and maneuver exercises which has been planned were vetoed by the mission commander, citing concern over the spacecraft's limited free-flight consumables and the urgency of reaching the station before its damage causes any more problems.

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After some two days of chasing Skylab, the retrofitted Apollo CSM comes within visual range of the station and the crew activate their video cameras to record the docking.

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After a fly-around and inspection the astronauts abandon the idea of pulling the stuck solar wing free with a pole, fearing that such a move might make the situation worse, and instead soft-dock to Skylab's forward drogue to consider their options. After some time, they agree on a new plan...

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First, the crew enters the station wearing their pressure suits to protect against the high temperatures and the toxic gasses released by them. Opening the scientific airlock, they then push an improvised sunshield fashioned from a collapsible parasol through to allow a safe and comfortable environment inside the orbital workshop. This procedure was developed after the stricken station was imaged by a [REDACTED] satellite, which provided engineers with an accurate assessment of the station's damaged exterior and showed that the airlock was still free of debris. Unfortunately, this meant that the scientific airlock would be unusable for the duration of the station's life.

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Over the next two weeks, the crew would progressively activate the station's systems, performing what experiments they could given the power shortage and adapting to life in space. Just as the Apollo Command Module itself offered its crews a great improvement in living space over the cramped Gemini capsule, so too did the cavernous Skylab OWS offer its inhabitants an unprecedented workspace. With three stories of workshop space, plus the docking module and Apollo CSM, the Skylab astronauts enjoyed a uniquely unobstructed experience of life in zero-G.

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Nearly two weeks into the mission, two of the three crewmembers perform the first spacewalk from the station, venturing outside to untangle the remaining solar wing. This spacewalk was the primary reason for the launch delays, requiring weeks of practice in Huntsville's neutral buoyancy simulator. After a nerve-wracking experience in which the solar panel flung itself outward upon being released and nearly threw the astronauts into the void, Skylab's power crisis was at last resolved. 

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During a second EVA the following week the mission's science specialist performed the first film retrieval from the Apollo Telescope Mount, scaling the ladder along its side to reach the film magazine on the top of the structure while a second astronaut assisted from below.

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At the end of twenty days, the crew departed the station, carrying a bounty of material samples and film canisters for analysis back on the ground. Skylab is successfully placed into a standby configuration, prepared for its next crew to arrive in a few weeks' time...

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57 minutes ago, septemberWaves said:

Which of the BDB ALSEP experiments correspond to the real experiments? Some of them are obvious but a few are not (e.g. the "Advanced Gravioli Detector"). In particular, I'm not sure what corresponds to the Cold Cathode Gauge Experiment, the Lunar Atmosphere Compositon Experiment, the Lunar Seismic Profiling Experiment, and the Passive Seismic Experiment Package.

While I haven’t checked all of them, the Passive Seismic Experiment is covered by the BG one (with the exception of the EASEP version which is included with the mod)

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8 hours ago, Pappystein said:

Sorry for the double quote.  But something popped into my head about the "Triple Layer Mylar"     the D.1A also has that I believe.      Remember D.1A and D.1T were supposed to be identical except for the jettisonable insulation in the case of D.1A as it was not under a PLF.

7 hours ago, Zorg said:

I do recall seeing D1T having additional MLI insulation somewhere but I cant find the source. Not a 100% sure though. Perhaps it meant in addition to D1 only

WRT D-1T, it's most likely Titan IIIE systems summary (https://ntrs.nasa.gov/api/citations/19750004937/downloads/19750004937.pdf), page 3-18. Unfortunately, pages 3-16 and 3-17 are missing (either still secret, or, most likely, bad physical copy), but 3-19 shows the sidewall Mylar blanket.

I haven't found any evidence of thermal blankets added to D-1A or D-1AR, though. Every source says these were used only on D-1T, and presumably were to be used later on G and G'.

Edited by biohazard15
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Full Album: Imgur: The magic of the Internet

Laggy and a bit wobbly, but it launched fine... the second time. Yeah... first time didn't go so well.

For those wondering how the MS-IC-1 is fueled, same way as the SSET head canonically, a pass-through pipe going through the booster closest to the tower into the core stage. You can see I added an extra pipe on the fore and interstage sections of the booster to help with fueling.

Bonus image from the first launch: The swing arm above the booster didn't get out of the way in time, got hit and destroyed. This caused the tower to start oscillating, causing the booster to continue to hit swing arms. Finally, it made contact with the tower and the two got into a power struggle. The tower won as you can see in the image. @AlphaMensae Might want to remove the Jello from your towers in the next update. :P

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And teaser image, not for space stations, but for a rescue mission coming up. And yes, both of these Apollos are on rescue duty. Who are they rescuing? You'll have to wait and see. :P Feel free to guess, but I won't be giving any hints.

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Edited by GoldForest
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6 hours ago, Invaderchaos said:

Some progress on the Centaur II/III tank and fairing. Just started texturing so there's no normal, spec, weathering and a bunch of other stuff. But this shows a general idea of what is to come:

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ITS SO BEAUTIFUL

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19 hours ago, Entr8899 said:

Interesting. Reminds me of the cancelled ISS power module that eventually became Rassvet. May I ask, what is the module on the rightmost view labeled "Spacelab"?

That is in reference to a Spacelab palette.

There were pressurized and unpressurized components to the ESA's Spacelab, earlier referred to as the "sortie lab". You could also compare it to the JEM "Kibō" on the ISS.

It's possible these components were to be changed out like logistics modules were on the ISS.

17 hours ago, pTrevTrevs said:

Are those APAS-75 docking ports? Would that system have been used if the shuttle were flying missions involving docking earlier, or would a new system have been developed like was done for Shuttle-Mir and ISS?

At the time the proposal was drawn up NASA was using APAS-75 in a lot of documents as a generic docking adapter. APAS-89 didn't exist yet.

17 hours ago, OrbitalManeuvers said:

Maybe everyone already knows what this is but me, but here goes ... is this "just" solar panels? Is there another source of EC generation? Is there EC storage?

The purpose of the PM was to provide a regulated 25kW power supply to the shuttle for extended science missions that would tax the built-in fuel cells' capacity.

The PM had a battery pack to regulate the supply. The solar arrays just topped off the batteries while in sunshine.

20 hours ago, Zorg said:

The 25kW power module was considered mainly for shuttle operations. It would have been berthed to the shuttle itself in most applications I think not 100% sure. One of the applications however was to use it to enhance a boosted skylab.

There were several use cases:

  • berthed to the shuttle (for use with Spacelab)
  • free-flying while attached to a science/experiment palette
  • attached to Skylab
  • attached to an early station (MSFC had several early station designs)
54 minutes ago, JebTheDestroyer said:

Love the new update! Any chance we could get a 0.9375m version of the new CADS docking port?

CADS was never supposed to be anything less than 1.25. ETS used it as a version of the RL CBM but with an androgynous flavor. 

When it first appeared in BDB it was too small. It triggered my OCD in no small way. :(

44 minutes ago, Entr8899 said:

Uhh, there's already one in the mod, Benjee10's APAS. The old CADS port was the APAS port from CxAerospace.

Indeed.

15 hours ago, Jcking said:

APAS-75 Ports appear in the illustrations, as well as in various proposed space stations and IPP stuff at the time. However it seems to me that they were more representative or an option for an androgynous docking port, and that the Shuttle or these other vehicles would have used an entirely different design as several are depicted with an entirely new design in conjunction and with APAS-75.

I would agree.

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8 minutes ago, GoldForest said:

I wonder what Skylab could do/be built out to if it had the 100KW solar array:

19790009716.pdf (nasa.gov)

19840022460.pdf (nasa.gov)

I believe the PM was designed to be retrieved by the shuttle and returned to Earth for maintenance. Perhaps an upgrade to the 100kW config was an option then... Partswitch on the BDB part in the future perhaps?

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13 minutes ago, bigyihsuan said:

What is that long thing even?

The entire ISS Truss Segment launched in one go on board the Saturn MLV-V-23(L).

 

7 minutes ago, Teslamax said:

I believe the PM was designed to be retrieved by the shuttle and returned to Earth for maintenance. Perhaps an upgrade to the 100kW config was an option then... Partswitch on the BDB part in the future perhaps?

The 100kW solar array is a different design altogether from the 25kW design. It had two separate designs, both made to be extremely compact. 

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Edited by GoldForest
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1 minute ago, Teslamax said:

There was a 25kW, 50kW, and 100kW version of the PM.

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Ah, didn't see those. Sorry. Looks like the 100kW one uses 4 solar panels instead of 2.

1 minute ago, Starhelperdude said:

Atlas SLV-3Y:

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made it to orbit

 

Now do it will MOL.

Edited by GoldForest
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