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[1.8.1-1.11.2] Bluedog Design Bureau - Stockalike Saturn, Apollo, and more! (v1.7.3 "Огромный" 19/Apr/2021)


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So I was trolling for some final data for my Titan IV article and found a reference to a McD paper on "reusing thor" rockets   The document is not share-able but it refered to a SLV-2A (basic TAT thor IIRC) with the "SGS" upper stage.   SGS is a two engine kick combination of a STAR-48 and a STAR-37XF.   The kicker for this is the SLV-2A was combined with a boat-tailed Delta Straight 8 (1.5m) fairing!

Of course my attempt to orbit an OGO based comm-sat failed miserably.  

kRHEefJ.jpg
 

Spoiler

z4dQC6m.jpg

 

fzonpv2.jpg

JIyu5iz.jpg

 

Having to carry the Delta P Truss up (this SGS stage uses a similar inter-stage to the Delta P but the inter-stage seems to be shed,) this Rocket did not make orbit.   On the positive, I finally figured out how to get the Spin stabilization devices to work.      Not that they provided any benefit... But it was cool to do!

 

Now the Structure starts with your payload.   Place a decoupler below the payload, then use the Delta P interstage.   Below the Delta P interstage attach a Star 37FMV (almost identical in performance to the XF listed above)    Place a 0.9375m spin table below that (with the despin weights on the engine caseing itself.   Place a 0.9375m decoupler below that.  Attach a Star 48BV below that.     On the Delta P faring adapter choose Delta 1000 as the faring type and leave it set to 0 segments.   Your payload needs to be below 0.25 tons in KSP scale to fly a 200km orbit (I believe.)   I was at 1.48tons and well I crashed.

Below the Delta P Fairing adapter you will use the Delta K interstage,   Below that fit an upside down customizeable (non Simple Fairing) 1.5m fairing.  don't bother setting the fairing up yet other than to disable staging.  

Below that attach a Thrust Augmented Thor (SLV-2A)

Viola SLV-2A/SGS is complete!  

IRL performance for the SLV-2A + SGS  

2020lbs (about 1 short ton) to 100nm orbit (or about 112 mile orbit)  

1900lbs to a 200nm orbit

1780 to a 300nm orbit

and 1650 to a 400nm Orbit

 

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Those of you interested in this have waited patiently enough.   I have done literally more research on the engines for the Titan IV and CT3 than any other rocket in the last 3 years.    Vexing to find accurate information, I will admit the numbers I present here are at best a guess because it appears publicly released documents from the USAF, NASA, Aerojet et al may have a typographical error when it comes to the thrust of the Titan III's LR87-AJ-11A.    I won't bore you all with the how and why.      I will just say that even though this is probably the best reaserched piece I have presented in a long while, errors, and worse out right wrong statements could be included.

 

Titan IV and Commercial Titan 3 (Titan CT3):

 

Previous post:

https://forum.kerbalspaceprogram.com/index.php?/topic/122020-181-1101-bluedog-design-bureau-stockalike-saturn-apollo-and-more-v171-огромный-18oct2020/&do=findComment&comment=3918520

 

Spoiler

We ended the article on the Titan III family with the Explosion of two Titan 34Ds, the Challenger Disaster, and the Explosion of a Delta rocket, all within a few months of each other.    The result was the formation of several independent investigative organizations to find out what happened.   On its most basic level, the result was NASA was playing games it could not win at with the Space Shuttle.   Thank you, President Nixon, for foisting this bad compromise onto NASA, known as the Space Shuttle.  Oh, and thank you to every President after Nixon (Ford, Carter, and Regan) for in one form or another re-asserting this idea.    With the Space Shuttle’s future flights steeply curtailed and NASA told they could not launch commercial satellites anymore, this meant that 3rd party companies were now free to create their own launch systems. 

What this meant for the Titan program were several things.  For the first time in almost 20 years, new engineering was restarting on the Titan Rocket.   The engineers started by removing all the old crap collected in the life of Titan III.    Martin Marietta dusted off their 1984 proposal for the “Titan 34D7,” which has a payload similar to the STS Space Shuttle system but be cheaper, reliable, and well keep Martin Marietta in the rocket game.     The cost savings were in efficiency and reduced security requirements compared to the STS Shuttle system.   Another nice feature of the Titan 34D7 was that it could be stockpiled.   This means that if a launch was needed in the near-term, it would not be very disruptive to other planned launches.    Martin spent time going over their previous Titan 34D7 proposal and “tightening” it up.  Engineering changes included new ways to weld the tanks together for small but still advantageous weight savings.   The Avionics of the Titan III series was completely stripped out and replaced with a newer, lighter system that provided ground control more feedback with fewer sensors.  It was called the WAAS system.  The WAAS system helped to keep costs down by integrating with both Cape Kennedy launch protocols and those at Vandenburg Air Force Base.  Beyond these changes, the Titan IV would see an increase in 2nd stage tank volume and structural length, allowing more fuel to be carried during flyout and providing clearance for the SRMs.   About the SRMs, initially, the UA-1207 in its new 3rd Generation form would fly.  This would be the last major technology from the KH-10/MOL system that flew in latter Titans.   While the UA-1207 had not flown in the 1960s as part of the KH-10/MOL system, it completed testing at that time.

The USAF agreed with Martin when they suggested the Titan 34D7, in its new form, was a new rocket, and it was re-named Titan IV.   Due to some lousy estimation that satellite sizes would continue to increase, the USAF ordered an all-new SRM in addition to the Titan IV and UA1207 to provide more lift.  This “SRMU” or SRM-Upgraded would help drive the Titan IV out of existence with its cost increases and maintain its hold on several “records” compared to other SRMs.   No large booster SRM flown or tested since has met the high standards in technology, construction, and impulse to empty weight ratio as the SRMU.      Yes, that includes the 5 segment SRB for SLS!

Titan IV was considered the least expensive alternative of the options for the CELV study.  It actually faced off in competition to the Atlas L / Atlas II, an entirely new rocket using Bossart design technique, as well as SRB-X.    The Atlas II or Atlas L (they are the same rocket) was a larger diameter balloon tanked rocket with 5x H-1D engines in a stage and a half design with 4 engines in the booster.   It was proposed that depending on the mission profile, to recover the booster segment.   While this would help to amortize the costs, it did little for the proposal since the cost to develop this new rocket, and the new launch site was more expensive.   The SRB-X was the dark horse proposal.  First off, it would require the use of the NASA-owned VAB and the NASA Shuttle launch sites.   Secondly, it would use a Titan III upper stage, which had left production.   Thirdly, it would interrupt Space Shuttle launches, slowing the shuttle program.   But the kicker was, the costs projected for SRB-X were based on 25 Shuttle Launches from Kennedy and 2 from Vandenburg per year.    This was not going to be achieved even before the Challenger debacle.  

After the Challenger explosion, Martin realized that a civilian launch market would be opening and decided to follow the Titan IV military launcher with a civilian version of the old Titan 34D.   While the new rocket, called Commercial Titan 3 or more commonly Titan CT3, was based on the broadly similar Titan 34D, it had more in common with the Titan IV.  Using the same upper stage redesign and the new manufacturing techniques applied to Titan IV, the CT3 would be lighter than the Titan 34D that preceded it and would utilize a hammerhead fairing similar in size to the old Titan IIIE but also lighter than that of the IIIE.   All of these changes would result in a superior civilian launcher… that nearly no one wanted.    Well, that is not a fair statement.  You see, between the military Titan IV launches, there was no place to LAUNCH Titan CT3.   Martin had banked on having two launch pads available for the Titan IV and the Titan CT3 at Cape Canaveral/Kennedy.  Instead, they only had one because other companies took the remainder of the “good” launch sites before Martin could even bid on them.    Good in this case, meaning it would not cost a considerable amount to modify the facility for the Titan CT3.   While the Commercial Titan 3 was a failure.  It wasn’t because of the hardware, but rather a few poor decisions on where to spend money when at Martin Marietta...  Buying out General Dynamics (the Atlas and F-16 Fighting Falcon producer) was more important to Martin Marietta than securing the extra launch site for Titan CT3.

Structurally the major difference between the Titan IV core and the Titan CT3 core was the length of its first stage tank.  While all-new, the Titan CT3 core utilized a tank that was the same overall length as the old Titan IIIM first stage tank.  The tank used on the Titan 33 and 34 series of Rockets.  This was done to reduce the transportation costs to the launch site.  The CT3’s upper stage was identical to the Titan IV in every way except software utilized in the avionics.   The shorter 1st stage precludes the use of the UA-1207 SRM as in the Titan IV.   This is due to interference drag between the hammerhead PLF and the SRM’s nose.  Keeping the two further apart reduces drag on the rocket. 

Neither the Titan IV nor the Titan CT3 were flown as many times as originally intended.  This, combined with the higher-than-expected launch costs vs. newer alternatives, and the toxicity of the core stage’s fuel, combine to reduce orders for these rockets.  Add the fact that Satellite payloads were shrinking and now growing as previously predicted by both NASA and the USAF, and you have rockets that no one wanted at all.

In the end, the CCB style tanks used on the Atlas V are directly descended from the Titan IV/CT3’s structural design.   There is some truth to the saying that “The Atlas V’s real name should be Titan V.”  It is my opinion that THIS is a crucial reason the Atlas V is in BDB.

It is a shame that Aerojet and Martin Marietta did not spend the effort to re-convert the Titan CT3 and Titan IV to Kerolox.   This change might have saved these rockets.  However, given a Kerolox version of these rockets would have required new launch facilities, the launch site conversion costs were likely why the final Titan variants stayed with AZ50/NTO fuel.  Short-term cost savings probably are what lead to the longer-term cancelation of the Titan programs.

The Titan IV would fly in two major subtypes…  Several options for the final stage include a no upper stage launch, IUS, the Titan Launch Dispenser (TLD,) and several others that are not well documented.    The Titan IVA would fly with the MOL/KH-10 tech UA-1207, seven-segment SRM.   As discussed both above and in previous articles, the UA-1207 was proposed for several un-flown Titan III proposals, the Titan 23C7,23D7 or Titan 3F, as well as several Saturn Follow on programs.   The Titan IVB would almost kill the Titan IV launch program on its own.   It was not because of flight issues but because the supposedly low-cost alternative to the expensive UA-1207 ended up being significantly MORE expensive even before several engineering failures led to test engines blowing up on the test stands.   The Titan IVB would fly on a new type of filament wound SRM, the SRMU.   SRMU, which stands for Solid Rocket Motor Upgrade, developed into a higher thrust, lighter alternative to the UA1207, which, as stated previously, was 1960s tech at its best.  The new SRMU would burn for 20 seconds longer with more thrust through most of the flight profile, allowing bigger payloads to space or payloads in a higher orbit.      Ignoring the engineering failures before the first Titan IVB launch, the SRMU needed many more launches before becoming cost-effective.   Beyond the engineering challenges, the SMRU’s lower two segments were hard to handle around the launch site due to their excessive size and mass.   This last fact is why I don’t think you see large SRMs proposed for anything except SLS at this juncture.

Beyond the changes listed above between the CT3 and T-IV rockets.   Another new and exciting change happened as part of the removal of the NASA-mandated “man rating” systems from the Titan Rockets.   Simply put, the engines were upgraded.   By confining the changes made to the 1st stage LR87 engine to new sensors and minor modifications to the turbopump, Aerojet optimized the engine for its new role.   The updated nozzle and slight alterations to the turbopumps themselves resulted in a gain of 0.6% (yes, six-tenths of a percent, not 6 percent!,) based on several PDFs.   The ISP was improved by 1 second at Vacuum as well.   The changes to the LR91 for the second stage are more drastic.   The same turbopump changes that helped the LR87 are applied to the LR91.   An increase in thrust by 5% over the baseline LR91-AJ-11 means the CT3/T-IV 2nd stage is a significant improvement in all respects.     These new engines may or may not have had the designation of LR87-AJ-11A and LR91-AJ-11A.

So here ends Titan, except for the Titan LDC proposals, which I may or may not cover separately.   

I hope this series of documents is informative and gives a little clearer explanation vs. many histories available online.   

 

This series of documents would not have been easy to complete had it not been for many papers I have accessed and or downloaded over the last five years.  Most of these documents were at one time available on the NASA NTRS servers dealing with Atlas, Titan, Thor, and Jupiter/Juno II.  NASASpaceflight.com provided some excellent cross-checking ability to verify the facts published by the manufacturers themselves rather than 2nd and 3rd hand.   Research through the National Museum of the USAF on their website, Ed Kyle’s Space Launch Reports website, Astronautix by Mark Wade, and the more obvious places like Wikipedia.org, Designationsystems.net, Wikivisually.com, and many books, both in paper and E-formats.

Surprisingly to me, while its organization leaves a bit to be desired, Wikivisually.com was more informative on Titan than Wikipedia.   Something to think about when you are doing future searches on Rockets!

 

Post script.   There is really only one "alternative proposal" or hypothetical version of the Titan CT3 or Titan IV to consider.    That is the Al-Li Restructured tanks.   On the Space Shuttle, these tanks provide an almost 20% mass reduction vs the standard Shuttle Tank.   On Titan they would result in an almost 10% (9.83%) empty tank mass reduction.   They would only be applied to the Titan IV tanks.   I estimate that the empty cost of the tanks would be triple that of standard Titan IV tanks.   CT3 never had a need for such a costly weight reduction program.

At the same juncture, we are seeing a rise in reporting of upper stages that had previously been called "No upper stage" launches of the Titan IV.   A big one is the Titan Launch Dispenser which was previously known as the Shuttle Launch Dispenser.   So as the days role on we learn new things.  

Thus ends this series of documents on the Titan family.  

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2 hours ago, Starhelperdude said:

rip titan family posts :sob:

Well I have Titan adjacent posts to do yet... like Centaur :D  Then again, Centaur is more of a hot mess than Titan!

But the Core of the production and limited-alteration What Ifs are done.  

 

2 minutes ago, CobaltWolf said:

Hey, just a small heads up, but I'm planning on doing a dev stream tomorrow morning. Hope to see some of you there! :)

awe just for me! :D   Will be there  Will start spamming the refresh button at 6:45AM :D

 

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On the BDB GitHub, in issues, there's a request for more science flavor text. Since
a. I don't have a GitHub account
b. I'm not sure if my suggestions are of any help
I'm just dropping these here, will edit with more as I come up with them:

Quote

Geiger Counter:

 default = Radiation levels are normal.
default = Radiation levels seem slightly higher than Kerbin normal.
default = Radiation levels are definitely higher than Kerbin normal. You ponder the potential health risks of staying here.
default = Collected local radiation levels.
default = You see a random spike, then immediately things go back to normal. Small solar flare, maybe?
default = Radiation levels here are lower than expected. Perhaps a local anomaly, perhaps a planetary magnetic field.
KerbinSrfLanded = Radiation levels are Kerbin normal. This is Kerbin, after all.
KerbinInSpaceLow = Radiation levels here are higher than on Kerbin's surface, but still safe for anykerb in a capsule.
KerbinFlyingHighBadlands = The Badlands seem to have higher than normal radiation levels. You vaguely remember reports of nuclear tests here.
KerbinSrfLandedR&D = Radiation levels are slightly higher than normal. You wonder what those scientists are up to inside the labs.
EeLooSrflanded = Radiation levels here are so low, tinfoil actually can protect you.

 

 

Edited by OrdinaryKerman
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28 minutes ago, OrdinaryKerman said:

On the BDB GitHub, in issues, there's a request for more science flavor text. Since
a. I don't have a GitHub account
b. I'm not sure if my suggestions are of any help
I'm just dropping these here, will edit with more as I come up with them:

These are great! Thanks.

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20 minutes ago, Adam-Kerman said:

On the long base fuel tank for Atlas (I believe to be "Atlas-2200 Balloon Fuel Tank")

Conformal Decals doesn't seem to want to attach to Atlas 2200, so how make it attach?

Atlas I "balloon" tanks can't have things attached to the surface, which simulates the real things which were remarkably fragile stainless steel covered in WD-40.  The unfortunate side effect is you can't attach conformal decals to them either.  You can workaround by attaching it to another part and nudging the decal into place.

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39 minutes ago, Adam-Kerman said:

On the long base fuel tank for Atlas (I believe to be "Atlas-2200 Balloon Fuel Tank")

Conformal Decals doesn't seem to want to attach to Atlas 2200, so how make it attach?

BDB atlas is configured with a special balloon tank type. Like the real thing these tanks are much lighter. As a balancing factor they do not allow surface attach. 

If you really needed to allow surface attach you need a patch. You can save the below into a text file with the extension .cfg and place anywhere in your game data. I might put this into BDB extras for anyone who might want it. (For me personally for most atlas builds I havent needed to do this. I usually attach the decal to where the vernier goes and then drag up. ButI understand this might not work for 2.5m or 3.125m atlas builds.

@PART[bluedog*,Bluedog*]:HAS[#bdbTankType[bdbBalloon]]:AFTER[Bluedog_DB]
{
	@attachRules = 1,0,1,1,0
}

 

Edited by Zorg
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26 minutes ago, Zorg said:

BDB atlas is configured with a special balloon tank type. Like the real thing these tanks are much lighter. As a balancing factor they do not allow surface attach. 

If you really needed to allow surface attach you need a patch. You can save the below into a text file with the extension .cfg and place anywhere in your game data. I might put this into BDB extras for anyone who might want it. (For me personally for most atlas builds I havent needed to do this. I usually attach the decal to where the vernier goes and then drag up. ButI understand this might not work for 2.5m or 3.125m atlas builds.

@PART[bluedog*,Bluedog*]:HAS[#bdbTankType[bdbBalloon]]:AFTER[Bluedog_DB]
{
	@attachRules = 1,0,1,1,0
}

 

so i can put it into 

Quote

C:\Program Files (x86)\Steam\steamapps\common\Kerbal Space Program\GameData\Bluedog_DB_Extras

and it will work as "Decals.cfg` or ?

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Just now, Adam-Kerman said:

C:\Program Files (x86)\Steam\steamapps\common\Kerbal Space Program\GameData\Bluedog_DB_Extras

Actually it should work anywhere in Gamedata.

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18 minutes ago, Adam-Kerman said:

so i can put it into 

and it will work as "Decals.cfg` or ?

You can call it anything.

17 minutes ago, Starhelperdude said:

I think you should put it into regular BDB gamedata, not extra

I would suggest putting personal patches into your own folder. Putting them in a mod folder you are likely to overwrite or lose it. It doesnt matter where it is for most patches as long as its in gamedata.

Edited by Zorg
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Some more flavor text suggestions, this time for the surveillance camera, biome-specific, Kerbin.

Quote

    KerbinInSpaceLowGrasslands = The grassland plains are the most 'alive' part of Kerbin. The cities, the lush green grass, the farmland, and the industry. This is home.
    KerbinInSpaceLowGrasslands = You really can see your house from up here! Oh, there's your annoying neighbor.
    KerbinInSpaceLowGrasslands = Observed farmland. Crop yields look up to 10 percent higher than last year.
    KerbinInSpaceLowGrasslands = Mapped some enemy roads. Should be useful if we ever go on an offensive.
    KerbinInSpaceLowGrasslands = Observing Kerbograd apartment buildings, doesn't seem to be any different than the ones in Filigrad and Yurigrad. In fact, they look exacty the same.
    KerbinInSpaceLowGrasslands = Observed military parade in Kerya. Weapons being developed are a concern, but their current capabilities don't seem to pose any real threat.
    KerbinInSpaceLowGrasslands = Found some stray kogs around the city. Maybe they can be used as test subjects.
    KerbinInSpaceLowGrasslands = This part of the grasslands is exactly that. Grassy. There are some small farms here, seems like their crop was recently harvested.
    KerbinInSpaceLowShores = The shallow waters near the coast are teeming with sea life. You can see schools of different fish, some koral, and seaweed.
    KerbinInSpaceLowShores = You can see the water from the rivers merge into the sea. You can see the cloudy dark blobs on some of those rivers.
    KerbinInSpaceLowMountains = Spotted what looks to be an observatory complex on a mountaintop. Its dome is closed for now.
    KerbinInSpaceLowMountains = Found a group of climbers. They seem to be surveying the rocks. Grade: mostly harmless.
    KerbinInSpaceLowMountains = Nothing of interest to national defense, just barren rock, but the fact that we can get to places where even the mountains look small is a testament to the accomplishments of society.
    KerbinInSpaceLowHighlands = The highlands. The nature, the farms, the rolling hills. You can see the plants growing.
    KerbinInSpaceLowHighlands = You can see the highland cities, and the tourism they are built on. 
    KerbinInSpaceLowHighlands = Snapped photo of a kerman with a largish telescope, pointing directly at the satellite. Amateur astronomer, probably. But why is he still looking up after dawn?
    KerbinInSpaceLowDesert = The desert looks hostile, but there are flourishing cities and settlements dotted across it, a reminder that anything can be done with enough will, time, and resources. The third, the desert has plenty.
    KerbinInSpaceLowDesert = Found some nomads on kamels, resting by an oasis. Not a threat.
    KerbinInSpaceLowDesert = Staring at what seems to be a mass of granular silicon dioxide. Are you sure you want to waste surveillance-grade film on this?
    KerbinInSpaceLowDesert = Spotted enemy rocket test! Fortunately for us, it failed just under a minute after liftoff.
    KerbinInSpaceLowWater = The boats and ships crossing Kerbin's waters seem mostly benign. 
    KerbinInSpaceLowWater = You can see the containers on the freighters, kerbs on ferries and the aircraft of a carrier.
    KerbinInSpaceLowWater = You spot a lone boat in the middle of the ocean. What is it doing?
    KerbinInSpaceLowWater = Snapped high-detail photos of the latest algae bloom. Its spread can be accurately determined from this image.
    KerbinInSpaceLowWater = All is calm this time, just a light breeze over the ocean and fish swimming underneath.
    KerbinInSpaceLowBadlands = Photographed some rocks, a tree, and a mining town.
    KerbinInSpaceLowBadlands = Captured images of oil wells among the rocks. May be important later.
    KerbinInSpaceLowBadlands = Spotted an airbase, large. Site marked as 'important'.
    KerbinInSpaceLowBadlands = This particularly treacherous, rocky view shows why this place is called "the Badlands". It really is bad.
    KerbinInSpaceLowTundra = You photographed a silo. Probably nuclear ICBM. You've also captured some tracks left behind by lorries servicing the silo. 
    KerbinInSpaceLowTundra = Trees, a bear, and some snow. Normal tundra stuff.
    KerbinInSpaceLowTundra = Just some rocks and a tent.
    KerbinInSpaceLowIceCaps = You get a very washed-out, fuzzy image from the bright white ice, so the high resolution image is utterly worthless here.
    KerbinInSpaceLowNorthernIceShelf = Ice, ice, and more ice. And what's that? A 50-kerb Krussian outpost? Probably harmless. `
    KerbinInSpaceLowNorthernIceShelf = Big glacier splitting off. Better put on some navigation warnings and inform the KOAA.  
    KerbinInSpaceLowNorthernIceShelf = You see some polar bears and seals. One seems to be eating the other.
    KerbinInSpaceLowSouthernIceShelf = Captured sub-meter resolution image of... ice. And some flocks of birds. And their kuano. At least you know where the ice is cracking.
    KerbinInSpaceLowSouthernIceShelf = Spotted the latest polar expedition. They seem to be all fine, but they got their snowkat stuck a few times.
    KerbinInSpaceLowSouthernIceShelf = Big crack spotted and... ice falling! At least the penkuins are safe.
    KerbinInSpaceLow = Collected very high-res images. You can discern cars, roads, rivers and even kermanholes from space!
    KerbinInSpaceLow = Kerbin looks beautiful from up here. But we're not interested in that. we're here for spying - oh, sorry, scratch that - science!
    KerbinInSpaceLow = Captured some interesting details on the planet's surface.

I think I can go back to doing other stuff now.

Edited by OrdinaryKerman
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Just now, memeking89 said:

Does anyone know if there is going to be a 1.11 version?

Yes, there will be one, it's just that

a. BDB is big. Have you ever seen the parts list?

b. It's getting bigger. The development team are working on new content (Hexagon, Saturn revamp, Timberwind, Waterfall compatibility)

So be patient. It's coming. Sooner or later.

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Hi, thanks for the gret work to start!

I have a question re contracts....does this mod include contracts?  if it does, i have a bunch of bluedog contracts that when i compete a contract, the exact same contract reappears...its like a neverending cycle...any help appreciated

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7 hours ago, memeking89 said:

Does anyone know if there is going to be a 1.11 version?

 

7 hours ago, OrdinaryKerman said:

Yes, there will be one, it's just that

a. BDB is big. Have you ever seen the parts list?

b. It's getting bigger. The development team are working on new content (Hexagon, Saturn revamp, Timberwind, Waterfall compatibility)

So be patient. It's coming. Sooner or later.

Yeah we're working on it. Some stuff to still do. We dont have a predicted date yet. But the Saturn update will be be huge and will be in a later update. We will push out an update with Mariner 10, Hexagon, Strawman, Timberwind etc much sooner. 

8 hours ago, OrdinaryKerman said:

Some more flavor text suggestions, this time for the surveillance camera, biome-specific, Kerbin.

I think I can go back to doing other stuff now.

Thanks so much again!

Edited by Zorg
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8 hours ago, jebalicious said:

Hi, thanks for the gret work to start!

I have a question re contracts....does this mod include contracts?  if it does, i have a bunch of bluedog contracts that when i compete a contract, the exact same contract reappears...its like a neverending cycle...any help appreciated

We do have custom contracts (if you have contract configurator installed), some are meant to repeat. Im not too familiar with them. Which contract is this? perhaps @Morphisor might have some insight.

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Strawman 1 (SLV-2G, VAFB)

 

Strawman, aka Heavy Ferret, was a short-lived (four launches in total) ELINT satellite program designed to investigate Soviet SAM and ABM radars. Build on top of Agena-D, it featured two major elements. 1st one, codenamed "Thresher", sported large mesh wire antennas and could detect radars with 24 km accuracy. 2nd one, codenamed "Reaper", consisted of a large array of helical antennas and was more accurate than Thresher (8 km). They also (except Strawman 3) featured auxiliary payloads designed to investigate Soviet ABMD radars (Note that some sources, namely Gunter, call these "SA-5" - which is incorrect. SA-5, aka S-200, is a long-range SAM without any ABM capabilities).

All Strawman satellites were launched from Vandenberg, atop Long Tank Thor-Agena D rockets. This is Strawman 1.

TCJBAob.png

Nice morning.

4SA0GQn.png

Welcome to new California! Now with Channel Islands DLC!

JAm98Hk.png

I just love this part.

5dMQ5JF.png

California seems to be hazy today. Or smoky.

GFoV5sN.png

VAFB is, unfortunately, still located on artificial peninsula. Also, dropping the Thor and performing 1st Agena burn.

pGHobGp.png

fihdMXn.png

Performing 2nd Agena burn, which places the Strawman at about 400x400x75deg orbit.

Ic3DRgL.png

Deploying  ELINT stuff and solar panels.

cTeCT1i.png

In its actual operational attitude, over Egypt\Sudan.

 

 

Edited by biohazard15
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