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Feminism and Manned Missions

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So I was bored, thinking about manned spaceflight and such. But then I thought about gender. What if the majority of these people on these flights were male/all were male? How would equality and feminist groups react? Would they attempt to stop/delay the launch so women could go on? What about the radicals? How far would they go to stop this if they would do so at all? 

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In the early years of spaceflight, the crews were all-male. Nobody really made a fuss, because it was the 60s.

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NASA typically has a good amount of women on missions nowadays. But, if we're being honest, women can, can complicate things. Not to say it's guaranteed, of course. But for some missions it's undesirable. Not to say that either gender is better/worse, it's just that some typically complicate things more often than the other.

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This thread is so going to be closed in a few posts... No offense, it's just that this kind of subject attracts flame-baity comments and "heated" discussions.

Anyway, historically, spaceflight has always been mostly manned by men (women represent less than 10% of astronauts).
This can be explained by two main reasons: early astronauts were usually taken from the airforce, and the military is also mostly men; and also, men are more physically strong than women (this is a biological truth) and high physical capabilities are required for astronauts.

Though I remember reading somewhere that women would be preferred to men for interplanetary missions because they would need less resources (especially food) than men, on average.

Edited by Gaarst
Clarification of last sentence

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11 minutes ago, Gaarst said:

This thread is so going to be closed in a few posts... No offense, it's just that this kind of subject attracts flame-baity comments and "heated" discussions.

Anyway, historically, spaceflight has always been mostly manned by men (women represent less than 10% of astronauts).
This can be explained by two main reasons: early astronauts were usually taken from the airforce, and the military is also mostly men; and also, men are more physically strong than women (this is a biological truth) and high physical capabilities are required for astronauts.

Though I remember reading somewhere that women would be preferred to men for interplanetary missions because they would need less resources (especially food) than men.

This thread can't get too bad. Just wanted a question answered, not a flame war burning this down.

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23 minutes ago, Gaarst said:

Though I remember reading somewhere that women would be preferred to men for interplanetary missions because they would need less resources (especially food) than men.

That really depends on the person, though.

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2 minutes ago, Bill Phil said:

That really depends on the person, though.

That is, on average of course.

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6 minutes ago, Dispatcher said:

I call them "crewed" missions.

While technically accurate, calling them "Manned" missions is equally correct.

I mean, would you call a fellow human a human? Even though "man" is in the word "human"? Or what if that fellow human is a woman? Which also happens to have the same word in it.

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17 minutes ago, Bill Phil said:

While technically accurate, calling them "Manned" missions is equally correct.

I mean, would you call a fellow human a human? Even though "man" is in the word "human"? Or what if that fellow human is a woman? Which also happens to have the same word in it.

Hello, fellow human!  Oh wait.  :)  See http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fellow

I think you'll find this interesting:

http://www.projectrho.com/public_html/rocket/lifesupport.php

Look in the "Waste Disposal" section, right above the "Hygiene" section.

 

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We certainly don't mind discussions, but these things are easily derailed. Please tread carefully, and try not too assume to much tone or intent.

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To answer the original question, I have never heard of any feminist groups stopping or even trying to stop any space launch in history, even though most if not every one has had more men than women on it.

Edited by 5thHorseman

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12 minutes ago, 5thHorseman said:

To answer the original question, I have never heard of any feminist groups stopping or even trying to stop any space launch in history, even though most if not every one has had more men than women on it.

Well feminist crazies are getting worse and worse. Not exactly stopping a launch, but remember when feminist nutjobs attacked Dr. Matt Taylor, a project scientist on the Rosetta mission, because of his T-shirt(a shirt incidentally made for him by a female friend, Elly Prizeman)? They forced him to apologize when he did nothing wrong.

Insanity.
space-shirt-AP.jpg

 

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1 hour ago, Dispatcher said:

Hello, fellow human!  Oh wait.  :)  See http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fellow

I think you'll find this interesting:

http://www.projectrho.com/public_html/rocket/lifesupport.php

Look in the "Waste Disposal" section, right above the "Hygiene" section.

 

Actually, let me quote that exact webster definition:

Quote

 

Full Definition of FELLOW

This is the first definition below it.

 

And about the waste disposal, that was my initial point in my first post. Some more things may be needed. You'll have to perform a proper Cost to Benefit analysis for proper judgement, though.

Edited by Bill Phil

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This thread is going nowhere good, and if history is any indication our community seems constitutionally unable to have a civil discussion of gender politics. Locking this one up.

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This topic is now closed to further replies.