winged

Real Airplanes (RO, AJE, FAR)

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doesn't mean it was originally designed by russians @Mikki... the B-1 was in devellopement when the Tu-160 came out and the f-111 came out in 1967

Russians almost only copied American designs for aerodynamic but Russians had better fuel

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The story of the Tu-160 is a bit particular. If Rockwell already made its B-1A flying while Sukhoi (after the T-4 cancellation) and Myasishchev O.K.B. were working on a new supersonic long-range strategic bomber, the Tupolev design bureau made the Tu-22M flew much more sooner (even if it was since the beginning conceived as a medium range bomber). Actually most of the work on the Tu-160 was made by Myasishchev with its M-18 and a huge presence of the Zhukovsky center engineers. Tupolev was then selected to improve and complete the project with its much more adapted research locations and as important : adapted assembly lines.

More interesting between these aircraft is the fact that if the F101 was a great achievement for General Electric (as P&W already made the TF30 run a lot of time before), Kuz' and its NK-32 nearly create a revolution in the low-bypass turbofan history.

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Lockheed L-1011 TriStar

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The Lockheed L-1011 TriStar, commonly referred to as the L-1011 (pronounced "L-ten-eleven") or TriStar, is a medium-to-long-range, wide-body trijet airliner by Lockheed Corporation. It was the third wide-body airliner to enter commercial operations, after the Boeing 747 and the McDonnell Douglas DC-10. The airliner has a seating capacity up to 400 passengers and a range over 4,000 nautical miles (7,410 km). Its trijet configuration has three Rolls-Royce RB211 engines with one engine under each wing, and a third engine, center-mounted with an S-duct air inlet embedded in the tail and the upper fuselage. The aircraft has an autoland capability, an automated descent control system, and available lower deck galley and lounge facilities.

The L-1011 TriStar was produced in two fuselage lengths. The original L-1011-1 first flew in November 1970, and entered service with Eastern Air Lines in 1972. The shortened, longer range L-1011-500 first flew in 1978, and entered service with British Airways a year later. The original-length TriStar was also produced as the high gross weight L-1011-100, up-rated engine L-1011-200, and further upgraded L-1011-250. Post-production conversions for the L-1011-1 with increased takeoff weights included the L-1011-50 and L-1011-150.

Between 1968 and 1984, Lockheed manufactured a total of 250 TriStars, assembled at the Lockheed plant located at the Palmdale Regional Airport in southern California north of Los Angeles. The aircraft's sales were hampered by two years of delays due to developmental and financial problems at Rolls-Royce plc, the sole manufacturer of the TriStar's engines. After production ended, Lockheed withdrew from the commercial aircraft business due to its below-target sales.

Source: Wikipedia.

 


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The Pegasus is an air-launched rocket developed by Orbital ATK, formerly Orbital Sciences Corporation. Capable of carrying small payloads of up to 443 kilograms (977 lb) into low Earth orbit, Pegasus first flew in 1990 and remains active as of 2016. The vehicle consists of three solid propellant stages and an optional monopropellant fourth stage. Pegasus is released from its carrier aircraft at approximately 40,000 ft (12,000 m), and its first stage has wings and a tail to provide lift and attitude control while in the atmosphere.


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Upon reaching a predetermined staging time, location, and velocity vector the aircraft releases the Pegasus. After five seconds of free-fall, the first stage ignites and the vehicle pitches up. The 45-degree delta wing (of carbon composite construction and double-wedge airfoil) aids pitch-up and provides some lift. The tail fins provide steering for first-stage flight, as the Orion 50S motor does not have a thrust-vectoring nozzle.

 

According to my experience the biggest advantage of air-launched rocket is not horizontal speed but rather higher altitude - which allows to use more vacuum optimized solid rocket motor with better ISP.


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Approximately 1 minute and 17 seconds later, the Orion 50S motor burns out. The vehicle is at over 200,000 feet (61 km) in altitude and hypersonic speed. The first stage falls away, taking the wing and tail surfaces, and the second stage ignites. The Orion 50 burns for approximately 1 minute and 18 seconds. Attitude control is by thrust vectoring the Orion 50 motor around two axes, pitch and yaw; roll control is provided by nitrogen thrusters on the third stage.


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Third stage completes the orbit.


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Edited by winged

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On 23/01/2017 at 10:00 PM, winged said:

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Mmmh... these lines! When its comes to the Valkyrie I'm so disappointed there is not a "Love this" button instead of just "Like this".

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MAKS

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The MAKS (Multipurpose aerospace system) (Russian: МАКС (Многоцелевая авиационно-космическая система)) is a cancelled Soviet air-launched with orbiter Reusable launch system project that was proposed in 1988, but cancelled in 1991. The orbiter was supposed to reduce the cost of transporting materials to Earth orbit by a factor of ten. The reusable orbiter and its external non-reusable fuel tank, was to have been launched by an Antonov AN-225 airplane, developed by Antonov ASTC (Kyiv, Ukraine). Had it been built, the system would have weighed 275 metric tons (271 long tons; 303 short tons), and would have been capable of carrying a 7-metric-ton (6.9-long-ton; 7.7-short-ton) payload.

Three variants of the MAKS system were conceived: MAKS-OS, the standard configuration; MAKS-T, with upgraded payload capability; and MAKS-M, a version that included its fuel tank within the envelope of the orbiter.

 

 

Two large boosters were used to allow for takeoff from a short, 2,5 km runway


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The MAKS air-launched manned space system weighed 620 metric tons on takeoff and consisted of three elements:

- An-225 Mriya carrier aircraft, the largest in the world, originally developed to transport the Buran orbiter. The Mriya would take the 275 metric ton MAKS piggy-back a launch position appropriate for the target orbit. The optimum release maneuver involved a dive from 7.8 km altitude to 6.8 km over a 7 km distance. The transport would then pull up, releasing MAKS at 8.6 km altitude and 900 km/hr. After release the transport nosed over, reaching a peak altitude of 8.8 km, leveling out at 8.2 km 20 km from the start of the maneuver.

- External tank. This carried liquid oxygen, kerosene, and liquid hydrogen propellants. It was 6.38 m in diameter and 32.1 m long, with a total mass of 248,000 kg and an empty mass of 11,000 kg.

- MAKS Orbiter. This spaceplane, designed for 100 reuses, used on-board systems based on those already developed for Energia and Buran. The orbiter had an empty mass of 18,400 kg, with a wingspan of 12.5 m and a length of 19.3 m. The aerodynamic shape was refined considerably from that of Spiral / 49 / Bizan to accommodate the main engine installation in the tail. An unmanned version could deliver 9.5 metric tons to a 200 km, 51 degree orbit in a payload bay 2.8 m diameter x 8.7 m long. The manned version took two crew and a payload of 8.3 metric tons in a bay 2.8 m diameter x 6.8 m long to the same orbit. In the orbiter's tail were two RD-701 tripropellant engines. These were designed for 15 re-uses and used dense kerosene and liquid oxygen for initial operations, then switched modes to a reduced thrust and higher specific impulse using low density liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen. This reduced the size of the huge hydrogen tank otherwise required. The RD-701 engine assembly in the MAKS had a total mass of 3990 kg and delivered a total thrust of 400,000 kgf at separation from the An-225.

 

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Docking test


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Reaction Engines Skylon

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Skylon is a design for a single-stage-to-orbit spaceplane by the British company Reaction Engines Limited (REL), using SABRE, a combined-cycle, air-breathing rocket propulsion system, potentially reusable for 200 flights. In paper studies, the cost per kilogram of payload carried to low Earth orbit in this way is hoped to be reduced from the current £1,108/kg (as of December 2015), including research and development, to around £650/kg, with costs expected to fall much more over time after initial expenditures have amortised. In 2004, the developer estimated the total lifetime cost of the programme to be about $12 billion.

The vehicle design is for a hydrogen-fuelled aircraft that would take off from a purpose-built runway, and accelerate to Mach 5.4 at 26 kilometres (16 mi) altitude using the atmosphere's oxygen before switching the engines to use the internal liquid oxygen (LOX) supply to take it into orbit. Once in orbit it would release its payload (of up to 15 tonnes). The vehicle will be unpiloted, but also be certified to carry passengers. All payloads could be carried in a standardised container compartment. The relatively light vehicle would then re-enter the atmosphere and land on a runway, being protected from the conditions of re-entry by a ceramic composite skin. When on the ground, it would undergo inspection and necessary maintenance. If the design goal is achieved, it should be ready to fly again within two days.

 

 


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Takeoff at record-breaking 200m/s


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Sadly I can't make it into space in its current state. Engine config is so underpowered that I can't go past mach 2 and after switching to closed cycle I am loosing control over the aircraft.


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Landing speed is suprisingly low - only 100 m/s for empty aircraft. That's 10 % lower than for MAKS and Dyna-Soar.

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Edited by winged

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I always wanted to spam as many aircrafts as possible. All in one place...

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Aircrafts you can see here consist of 1500 parts (total)...

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More pictures here: http://imgur.com/a/OwuGQ

 

 

Edited by winged

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On 2017/2/5 at 3:48 AM, winged said:

I always wanted to spam as many aircrafts as possible. All in one place...

 

 

Aircrafts you can see here consist of 1500 parts (total)...

 

 

 

 

 

 

More pictures here: http://imgur.com/a/OwuGQ

 

 

O_O What kind of FPS do you get with that many planes?

Edited by Yukon0009

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9 hours ago, winged said:

-snip-

O_O What kind of FPS do you get with that many planes?

Edited by Yukon0009

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19 minutes ago, Yukon0009 said:

O_O What kind of FPS do you get with that many planes?

Stable 60 FPY.

 

Could you edit your post and remove the pictures? There's no point in posting them more than once in the same place.

Edited by winged

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On 2/5/2017 at 7:00 AM, winged said:

Stable 60 FPY.

 

Could you edit your post and remove the pictures? There's no point in posting them more than once in the same place.

Dear sir, how do you get 60 FPS?

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On 7.09.2017 at 0:00 AM, HunHarcos said:

Dear sir, how do you get 60 FPS?

60 frames per year not per second.

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Kerb-Flyer I - my own idea of how the beginnings of kerbal aviation could look like:

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900 kg of weight, only 1 kN of thrust at takeoff , top speed  - 33 m/s (120 km/h)

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With very low terminal velocity (50 m/s), Kerb-Flyer i could function as a braking parachute rather than actual plane.

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Triple tail inspired by Lockheed Constellation

 

 

Republic XP-72

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Fictional MiG-R  - fictional plane designed to brake speed record for a propeller driven aircraft.  MiG-R is equipped with one or two R-4360 engines, depending on the version. Two-engined version achieved 280 m/s (mach 0,799) at sea level.

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Edited by winged

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P-47 Turbobolt - Thunderbolt with a jet engine (slowest jest I've ever created with a top speed of only 840 km/h)

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XB-70 "RAPIER" - Valkyrie with 6 RAPIER engines - fastest and highest flying jet I've ever created

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MiG-21 + J-58 engine - fastest climbing jet (0-3000 m), fastest at sea level and with altitude record of 64,8 km using zoom climb method:

https://imgur.com/a/usDMP

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Every time I stop by here, I find better, and more beautiful creations. This is how it should be, and I hope you never stop making these amazing creations!
(If you put one craft per reply, I can give them all a like, rather than one like for a column of new craft!) :D:wink:

Edited by He_162

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Hey, any ideas what mod those see-through cockpits are from? I'm certain I've seen them before.

Edit: Found them!

Edited by Sebastiaz

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On 8/16/2018 at 6:09 PM, Capt.gelo said:

how do you add textures for Pwings?

You can download them from here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/nbdsp77j50jc8vd/CamoWings.rar?dl=0 then simply replace the textures in GameData\B9_Aerospace\Parts\Aero_Wing_Procedural

 

On 8/26/2018 at 5:03 PM, Sebastiaz said:

Hey, any ideas what mod those see-through cockpits are from? I'm certain I've seen them before.

Edit: Found them! 

Don't even remember the name of this mod but I am glad that you found them.

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Alpha Mars - 85 kg unmanned aircraft designed for flying in the lowest areas of Mars, using electric propulsion. The propeller is so powerful in low Earth atmosphere that the plane is flying only at 6% throttle. very low wing loading - 6,5 kg/m^2 - comparable with many birds, 100x lower than modern airliners.

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Alpha Extreme - record breaking plane:

- lowest wing loading (2,8 kg/m^2)

- lowest take off speed - just 8 m/s

- 30.000 m - service ceiling - not exactly a record but still very high number.

- 70m wingspan and just 340 kg of weight

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Edited by winged

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