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Juno Arrival This Year!


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First image capture by Juno:

pia20707_figa.0.0.jpg


Taken on Sunday (10/7) at 4,3 million km. I know that spacecraft send low-res images before sending high-res so the team can select which one is worth spending time downloading with the low bandwidth. So I don't know if this is the low-res or final resolution, I heard that JunoCam is not a good camera, but I thought it wouldn't be that bad. Here's a photo from Cassini at 10 million km:

 

Spoiler

507898main_PIA04866-full_full.jpg


Anyway, Juno will get as close as 5000 km at perijove, so maybe the camera quality will be enough at this distance. I know that photos are not an important aspect of Juno mission, but since Jupiter is my favorite planet I can't say that this do not make me a little sad :(

OBS: Sorry if the text is somewhat confusing or bad written, my english is not flowing well today...

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Cassini obviously has a better imaging system compared to JunoCam as photographic data of high resolution was an important aspect of Cassini's survey of the Saturnian system (especially in the early years).Surveying moons are not the focus of the Juno mission. As such having imagers with equivalent to Cassini or of Galileo is not necessary. According to the wiki article on JunoCam; it's resolution of 15 km/px at periapsis would be superior to Hubble's 119 km/px from it's vantage point above Earth.

Edited by Exploro
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  • 3 weeks later...
On 7/17/2016 at 7:06 PM, Exploro said:

Cassini obviously has a better imaging system compared to JunoCam as photographic data of high resolution was an important aspect of Cassini's survey of the Saturnian system (especially in the early years).Surveying moons are not the focus of the Juno mission. As such having imagers with equivalent to Cassini or of Galileo is not necessary. According to the wiki article on JunoCam; it's resolution of 15 km/px at periapsis would be superior to Hubble's 119 km/px from it's vantage point above Earth.

considerably, and the hubble pics look great, cant wait for these.

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2 hours ago, r4pt0r said:

considerably, and the hubble pics look great, cant wait for these.

I believe that is a composite view where the auroras are in the ultraviolet, much like Chandra took these of the aurora in the x-ray. Can be a bit deceiving but JunoCam's views from the visible spectrum should be different. Nevertheless exciting and totally awesome.

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  • 1 month later...
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A processed video of Juno's 21st December 2018 Perijove-17 Jupiter flyby.

 

Quote

           Juno's Perijove-17 Jupiter Flyby, Reconstructed in 125-Fold Time-Lapse

2019-02-10 23:46 UT
Credit : Credit: NASA / JPL / SwRI / MSSS / SPICE / Gerald Eichstädt © public domain
Submitted By : Maquet-80
Mission Phase : PERIJOVE 17

On December 21, 2018, NASA's Juno probe successfully performed her Perijove-17 Jupiter flyby.

The movie is a reconstruction of the 2 hours and 15 minutes between 2018-12-21T16:15:00.000 and 2018-12-21T18:30:00.000 in 125-fold time-lapse.  It is based on 30 of the JunoCam images taken, and on spacecraft trajectory data provided via SPICE kernel files.  In steps of five real-time seconds, one still images of the movie has been rendered from at least one suitable raw image. This resulted in short scenes, usually of a few seconds.  Playing with 25 images per second results in 125-fold time-lapse.  Resulting overlapping scenes have been blended using the ffmpeg tool.

In natural colors, Jupiter looks pretty pale. Therefore, the still images are approximately illumination-adusted, i.e. almost flattened, and consecutively gamma-stretched to the 4th power of radiometric values, in order to enhance contrast and color.  The movie starts with a reconstructed in-bound sequence approaching Jupiter from north on its night side. Then the orbit approaches Jupiter down to an altitude of about 5,000 km near 18.1 degrees north (planetocentric), according to long-term planning of November 2017.  JunoCam looked towards Jupiter's limb during close flyby.  Then, the Great Red Spot, and the anticyclone Oval BA come into the field of view.  This is followed by a transition into the outbound orbit, with images of Jupiter's south polar region.

https://www.missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam/processing?id=6465

 

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