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Blue Origin Thread (merged)


Aethon
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That moment of intenseness when it freezes, though. The first line of my above post was written during the freeze. The second was after the freeze :cool:

Yeah! Space! Rockets! Reusability! Poetry (Don't ask)!

Onwards to Mars!

Also, it's going on 1AM here. Better get some sleep.

Edited by Ultimate Steve
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So, what could cause feed interruptions during landing? They all happen roughly around the same time, when the first stage is about to enter the frame.

We don't know what equipment they use for transmission, but we can take some guesses regardless, right?

There could be vibration from the intense sound that rattle their antennas.

Could hot exhaust gases create a barrier? Hmm, if they used aluminum based solid fuel I'd say yes but kerosene... I don't know, that doesn't sound likely.

Another source, which I consider the most likely, could be the low bandwidth of their link. It is all fine until the scene starts to significantly change. Video compression works like a charm when you have a static and barely changing scene, but as soon as there are significant changes (like a huge ball of fire entering the frame), the video compression can no longer keep the file size small and the bandwidth requirements skyrocket.

On a completely unrelated note, payload separation about to happen...

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5 minutes ago, Shpaget said:

Could hot exhaust gases create a barrier?

AFAIK, the air around the base of the rocket is ionized during landing. Same thing happens during re-entry. So, that blocks signals. That, combined with the shaking, is probably what causes the blackout.

Also, the sat has separated!

It's past 1 AM here, good night everyone!

Edited by Ultimate Steve
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I believe it's the combination of all above. Wireless technology is still quite fragile. Heck, my radio net link loses the signal when it's raining, or if there is too much snow on the antenna. Last year it got so bad, my provider sent a tech team to check what is going on on my end. It turned out something (likely a bird) threw the antenna out of alignment a bit, causing it to lose connection completely.

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44 minutes ago, Ultimate Steve said:

Ready for launch!

Tab #1: This thread

Tab #2: SpaceX Twitter

Tab #3: Elon Musk Twitter

Tab #4: Hosted webcast

Tab #5: The Final Countdown! (Start it at t-52sec for epic timing)

@CatastrophicFailure It's working ok for me. Try the other webcast, or refreshing?

  1. Hosted webcast, volume lowered in youtube
  2. Technical webcast, volume all the way up
  3. SpaceX twitter
  4. Elon Musk twitter
  5. /r/spacex launch thread
  6. #spacex IRC
  7. This thread

Ooh, and look at this great photo:

Oqe5iyk.jpg

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Why do they almost always lose the signal just before the landing on the barge? Do they not want to show it in case of a failure, or maybe super hot gas exhaust causes some sort of signal loss? If so, why?

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In the hosted webcast they said, that the vibrations from the engines causes the whole system to vibrate and thus loosing the signal to the satellite. According to SpaceX it is not intentional, nor do I believe it is, because it also denies them the PR in case of success. And as far as I can see it, they have ironed most of the issues out.

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