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Blue Origin Thread (merged)


Aethon
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Thanks!

You're welcome :)

I love SpaceX, but I gotta say the fact they're never on time really annoys me sometimes. I stayed up all night to watch this launch, and again it is scrubbed. I know it wasn't their fault this time, but man are they never on time!

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You're welcome :)

I love SpaceX, but I gotta say the fact they're never on time really annoys me sometimes. I stayed up all night to watch this launch, and again it is scrubbed. I know it wasn't their fault this time, but man are they never on time!

You got someone's million dollar satellite on YOUR rocket. I'd cancel if someone farted in the wrong direction.

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Next launch windows: Tomorrow (23:07:49 UTC) - Tuesday - Wednesday - February 20th

You got someone's million dollar satellite on YOUR rocket. I'd cancel if someone farted in the wrong direction.

Yes but it might turn out to be a problem for them. Customers would get annoyed too after a while I guess, it's a bigger problem than you might expect, other than from a spectator's point of view.

ULA's Tory Bruno also said this a few days ago, referring to SpaceX:

Comparing others' record to ULA's? Interesting exercise. Look at On Time Launch, A-L-L P/Ls to orbit, & Ins. premiums, as well
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Air Force tracking station issue. Nothing wrong with the rocket it seems.

60% chance of rain for tomorrow's attempt. We're probably looking at a Tuesday launch. Hopefully no boats show up.

The good news is, every time we get a scrub, there's more daylight for the next attempt!

Edited by Airlock
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According to the chatter, there were 2 problems going on: 1 was a downrange tracking station, but the other was an avionics problem on the launcher. I interpreted it as a selftest problem with the ADI (Nav ball) but wasn't sure.

Did anyone else notice the KSP music at the beginning of the feed?

Best,

-Slashy

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......

Yes but it might turn out to be a problem for them. Customers would get annoyed too after a while I guess, it's a bigger problem than you might expect, other than from a spectator's point of view.

.....

Launching in spite of problems is just reckless, what is one day when a multimillion dollar investment is at stake. Companies are more mature than getting annoyed at short delays.

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Launching in spite of problems is just reckless, what is one day when a multimillion dollar investment is at stake. Companies are more mature than getting annoyed at short delays.

That's not what I mean. Obviously, if there's a problem it's always better to scrub, but the fact that they've had to scrub almost every single launch so far means there's some obvious problem in organizing the pre launch sequence or something. Do you think that scrubbring every launch is normal? Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think that scrubbing a launch is such a common things as it is with spacex.

Edited by Frida Space
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That's not what I mean. Obviously, if there's a problem it's always better to scrub, but the fact that they've had to scrub almost every single launch so far means there's some obvious problem in organizing the pre launch sequence or something. Do you think that scrubbring every launch is normal? Have you been following space launches for six months?

This one had nothing to do with SpaceX. It was a problem with the Air Force radar.

Don't complain at SpaceX for something that is completely out of their control.

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This one had nothing to do with SpaceX. It was a problem with the Air Force radar.

Don't complain at SpaceX for something that is completely out of their control.

I'm aware of that. Either way, launch team was NOGO, so it would have very probably been scrubbed.

And yes, I know Elon musk tweeted everything was fine with the rocket, but he said that quite a while after the abort and the launch controllers didn't know that at T-2m26s, so a T-2m they would have probably called it off. That's what I read everywhere so far, at least.

Edited by Frida Space
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lse notice the KSP music at the beginning of the feed?

I had the live feed in background while my girlfriend was on the PC, than I heard KSP's music and thought she started accidently the game to realized that it was the feed. :D

I'm not sure to understand the 1sec launch window? Is the satellite supposed to be in orbit around Earth, if so, why care?

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I'm not sure to understand the 1sec launch window? Is the satellite supposed to be in orbit around Earth, if so, why care?

It's going to Earth-Sun L1, and even earth-orbiting missions usually have much more stringent requirements than just 'in orbit'. Imaging sats usually need to go to SSO, communications or navigational sats into the right plane, and resupply craft obviously have to be heading to the station.

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I had the live feed in background while my girlfriend was on the PC, than I heard KSP's music and thought she started accidently the game to realized that it was the feed. :D

I'm not sure to understand the 1sec launch window? Is the satellite supposed to be in orbit around Earth, if so, why care?

All space launches (except for maybe sub-orbital) require the Earth to be in a specific position in order to achieve the desired orbit or flight-path. With each launch there is a specific, instantaneous time when it is most optimal to launch. However, with extra fuel and thrust, most launches have a time range or window within which they can launch at anytime. If they don't launch right at the exact, instantaneous optimal time, they just burn a little extra fuel. This payload was going to the Earth L1 Lagrange point which is beyond Lunar (was about to type Munar) orbit. Due to fuel requirements of reaching that target, the Falcon 9 v1.1 has only a 1 second window, otherwise it runs the risk of running out of fuel and not achieving the targeted L1 orbit.

There was a nice link to a good explanation about launch windows, orbital planes and phases. I'll try to find it and post it here.

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There was a nice link to a good explanation about launch windows, orbital planes and phases. I'll try to find it and post it here.

You might be thinking of this link:- http://www.baen.com/rendezvous.asp

and this one:- http://www.baenebooks.com/10.1125/Baen/9781625792785/9781625792785.htm?blurb

Open the page, go to the left margin and select chapter 5, then chapter 6.

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It's going to Earth-Sun L1, and even earth-orbiting missions usually have much more stringent requirements than just 'in orbit'. Imaging sats usually need to go to SSO, communications or navigational sats into the right plane, and resupply craft obviously have to be heading to the station.

I was curious if the 1 second window wasn't actually a requirement of the barge landing test? The last Falcon launch (CRS-5 to the ISS) also had a 1 second launch window, IIRC. That's far more restrictive than the Shuttle for an ISS rendezvous mission.

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I was curious if the 1 second window wasn't actually a requirement of the barge landing test? The last Falcon launch (CRS-5 to the ISS) also had a 1 second launch window, IIRC. That's far more restrictive than the Shuttle for an ISS rendezvous mission.

Same as for previous Dragon resupply missions. Shuttle was different because it had injection accuracy too poor for these kind of transfers, and a lot of delta-v capability to compensate.

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I'm aware of that. Either way, launch team was NOGO, so it would have very probably been scrubbed.

And yes, I know Elon musk tweeted everything was fine with the rocket, but he said that quite a while after the abort and the launch controllers didn't know that at T-2m26s, so a T-2m they would have probably called it off. That's what I read everywhere so far, at least.

^ This.

Musk tweeted that the rocket was fine, but avionics was chasing an issue from the 10 minute "around the horn" check. They recommended the countdown continue and a hold at 2:00. They did not have the issue resolved at 2:45 (or thereabouts), so even if AF tracking hadn't gone offline, they almost certainly wouldn't have gone to space today.

It doesn't matter whether or not something was *actually* wrong with the vehicle. They thought there was something wrong and that would've been enough for a hold (read "scrub").

Best,

-Slashy

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