Sandworm

KSP just helped me pass an important test | Updated with work pics

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Update:  I have made it.  I'm scheduled for fly east for officer training next month, followed by flight school in August.

 

Unlike the American system, application to the combined Canadian Armed Forces is a very long and involved process, with pilot being by far the most rigorous.  I've been bounced across the country several times, done many interviews, passed numerous background and been subject to every medical check not involving knives.  It took years.  If anyone wants to ask any questions about the application process I'll answer if I can.  In a few weeks I'll disappear for months and will likely not be able to speak about much of anything for a long while.

In a year or so, I might be doing this:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mKEqrVxdCmo

If I have any input on callsign "Jebediah" and "Kerbal" are on my list.

-Sandworm

Edited by Sandworm

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On 21-4-2017 at 1:16 AM, Sandworm said:

-snip-

-Sandworm

Will your callsign be "Sandworm " ? ^_^

Pretty cool. Goodluck.

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Some have asked me for more information.  While I'm limited by various rules, there is lots of info online:

Job Requirements/Qualifications:
http://www.forces.ca/en/job/pilot-32

The Big Test: (Where KSP helps, >90% failure rate)
http://www.rcaf-arc.forces.gc.ca/en/cf-aircrew-selection-centre/candidate-guide.page

Basic training*: (Where I go next, 50% wash-out rate)
http://www.forces.ca/en/page/training-90

My path after basic: (Another 50% wash-out rate in first phase)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NATO_Flying_Training_in_Canada

Recent grad video for "fast-jet" trainee pilots about to move on to jet trainers:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mKEqrVxdCmo

 

*Canadian forces are "combined".  Army/Navy/AF all go to basic training together.  This is strange for those more familiar with the US system of distinct branches of service.  All pilots work in the AF and start at the same flight school.  A helicopter on a ship is flown by an AF pilot.  The upside is that all aircraft programs are open to all pilot candidates.  If you have your heart set on a particular airframe you don't have to worry about enlisting in the wrong service.

Edited by Sandworm

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Final update:  Goodbye!

 

I fly east for basic training tomorrow morning, three months of running around in the woods doing pushups.  But after that military flight school.

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Best of luck Sandworm. . .you've got a bunch of people on this forum pulling for you. :)

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Good luck, and good job. Reminds me of this picture.
orbital_mechanics.png

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Update:  I graduated and am now a Second Lieutenant in the Royal Canadian Air Force.  I have been attached to a helicopter squadron on Vancouver island.  Ill be with them for a period of months while I wait for flight school.  I'm not piloting anything yet but am here to learn about flight operations and air force procedures.  It's not flight school but I do wear a flight suit to work.  My desk is feet from giant helicopters and most everyone I work with is either a military pilot or aircrew.

 

YLwiwDR.jpghVeCcfr.jpg

Edited by Sandworm

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Hangar extension mod?

Also:  stock helicopters?  I don't believe it.

I remember reading your initial post telling us about how three of twenty passed the test, and of the three, two played KSP--and my first thought was, and the other seventeen used Hyperedit.

Jokes aside, now that you're there, the only thing I can say is congratulations, LT.  I hope having your desk feet away from a helicopter doesn't make paperwork too difficult.  Have you gotten your callsign yet, or does that wait until flight school?

Edited by Zhetaan

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Callsign? No.  that is a couple years away, once im qualified to fly something armed.

There are some very kerbal things here.  in one hall there are boxes labeled "aircraft engine - DO NOT DROP".  Our biulding is also very new and clean.  The various perfect yellow lines on the grey floor looks much like the ksc.

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Awesome job. A little Googling tells me the only chopper squadron on V.I. is 443 Squadron in Victoria. I was in Air Cadets at CFB Comox back in the late 80's/. Those Sea King photos kinda threw me (at first I thought 440 was a Comox squadron until I refreshed my memory), since neither of those squadrons are even based in BC.

When you are finally qualified to fly one of those eggbeaters, tell them you want a couple of Hammers (not the kind you hit nails with) mounted on it for emergency power. Or maybe a couple of Thuds.

And you have to keep an eye on those ground crew guys. I think Jeb may have been driving this one.

625a24182f091c0ff7568a8ddf814cdf--safety

Hopefully you won't be posted on this boat...

tfgzjvcsvt.jpg

Edited by StrandedonEarth

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On 9/20/2017 at 11:23 AM, Zhetaan said:

<snip> Also:  stock helicopters?  I don't believe it. <snip>

Believe it or not they do exist! 

Spoiler

uKp32BA.jpg

@Sandworm congrats on your career progress! I wish you the best of luck with becoming a pilot!

Keep us updated! :)

 

 

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Another update for those who care:

My practical training has begun in earnest.  I've just finished sea survival school (the post-ejection one-man raft stuff) and some work in pressure chambers playing around with hypoxia and rapid decompression.  Phase one flight school starts next month, with phase two later in the year.  It will be just over a year before they decide whether I am to fly helicopters (50%) transports (25%) or fighters (25%).

If anyone has questions about pilot training, being an officer, or about the military in general please do not hesitate to pm me.

 

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57 minutes ago, Sandworm said:

Another update for those who care:

My practical training has begun in earnest.  I've just finished sea survival school (the post-ejection one-man raft stuff) and some work in pressure chambers playing around with hypoxia and rapid decompression. 

 

Fun!:wink:

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Congratulations.  And don't forget there is a proven career path from RCAF pilot to ISS Commander... :)

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Congratulations, may your future piloting career contain fewer crashes than in KSP. :D

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Don't worry, none of this is classified info.  All is available on public websites.  Many civilian jobs (SAR people, airline pilots) take these courses: 

q2Y4YcFm.jpg2jc0f3fm.jpg

Sea Survival(4 days):

The first two days are general "air crew" training for what to do when an aircraft ditches in water, group drills involving survival suits and 10-man rafts.  Then come two days on post-ejection sea survival.  This involves being dragged behind a boat to practice getting out of a parachute, then climbing into the one-man raft that inflates when a pilot ejects.  In top gun you see tom cruise in one when goose dies.  Count the SIX rafts and one boat in the pic.  It was a cold rainy day in those things.   For a closer (in a pool) view see: http://www.luke.af.mil/News/Photos/igphoto/2000842068/  Canada doesn't have the big bucks for fancy heated pools.  We practiced in the ocean.  Note the black rafts and inflated vests.  Sometimes we don't want to be found.  You won't see black survival gear outside the military.

Hypoxia Training (5 days):

This isn't what you think.  This isn't like holding your breath.  You don't feel/smell anything.  It's like breathing helium.  For most people it feels like getting drunk.  This is about recognizing the symptoms and activating the emergency O2 equipment.  In this pic the chamber is at 10,000-feet atmospheric pressure.  The safety people in the chamber don't need to use masks.  We pilots are being fed a mix of reduced oxygen to simulate 25,000.  It is perfectly safe so long as you switch over to O2 once you realize what's happening.  We also did some rapid decompression stuff which was fun but less safe.

Look closely at the pic.  We are playing games on those iPads.  The color stuff on the walls is for recognizing visual symptoms.   The vertical yellow levers switch between the two gas sources.  Beside each pilot is a panel (see link) that can switch on an emergency mode where the O2 is actually forces into your lungs.  Imaging breathing in reverse.

http://www.cobham.com/media/1669312/OR0050 Oxygen Regulator.jpg

I have several rounds of actual flying school booked this year.  That's where the real fun starts.

 

Edited by Sandworm

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6 minutes ago, Sandworm said:

Don't worry, none of this is classified info.  All is available on public websites.  Many civilian jobs (SAR people, airline pilots) take these courses: 

q2Y4YcFm.jpg2jc0f3fm.jpg

Sea Survival(4 days):

The first two days are general "air crew" training for what to do when an aircraft ditches in water, group drills involving survival suits and 10-man rafts.  Then come two days on post-ejection sea survival.  This involves being dragged behind a boat to practice getting out of a parachute, then climbing into the one-man rafts that inflate when a pilot ejects.  Count the SIX rafts in the pic.  It was a cold day in those things. In top gun you see tom cruise in one of these when goose dies.  For a closer (in a pool) view see: http://www.luke.af.mil/News/Photos/igphoto/2000842068/  Canada doesn't have the big bucks for fancy heated pools.  We practiced in the ocean. 

Hypoxia Training (5 days):

This isn't what you think.  This isn't like holding your breath.  You don't feel/smell anything.  It's like breathing helium.  For most people it feels like getting drunk.  This is about recognizing the symptoms and activating the emergency O2 equipment.  Look closely at the pic.  We are playing games on iPads.  The color stuff on the walls is for recognizing visual symptoms.    In this pic the chamber is at 10,000-feet atmospheric pressure.  The safety people in the chamber don't need to use masks.  We pilots are being fed a mix of reduced oxygen to simulate 25,000.  It is perfectly safe so long as you switch over to O2 once you realize what's happening.  We also did some rapid decompression stuff which was fun but less safe.

 

 

That looks really tough. Congrats!

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