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SLS rocket challenge


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4 minutes ago, eagle92lightning said:

what is that (sorry still a newb to ksp haven't even been to the Mün yet)

This

Circumlunar-free-return-trajectory.png

1024px-Apollo_13_timeline.svg.png

This trajectory was used by the Apollo missions in case of an engine malfunction on the way to the moon. This would provide a free return to Earth without needing an engine. Apollo 13 used this trajectory that you see here.

2 hours ago, eagle92lightning said:

EM-1 unmanned?

Don't you mean EFT-1?  EM-1 is going to be unmanned but EFT-1 was also unmanned.

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37 minutes ago, Munbro Kerman said:

This

Circumlunar-free-return-trajectory.png

1024px-Apollo_13_timeline.svg.png

This trajectory was used by the Apollo missions in case of an engine malfunction on the way to the moon. This would provide a free return to Earth without needing an engine. Apollo 13 used this trajectory that you see here.

Don't you mean EFT-1?  EM-1 is going to be unmanned but EFT-1 was also unmanned.

 

oh okay cool. And no EFT-1 was manned. EM-1 will be unmanned.

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Here is my take on EM-1: (Images in spoilers since they are huge)

Spoiler

Sitting on the Pad

Sitting on Pad

Spoiler

Engine Ignition / Liftoff

Engine Ignition

Spoiler

Booster Separation

Booster Separation

Spoiler

LES Jettison

LES Jettison

Spoiler

First Stage Separation

First Stage Separation

Spoiler

Fairing Deploy

Fairing Deploy

Spoiler

Maneuver Node

Preparing Maneuver Node

Spoiler

Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage Ignition

Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage Ignition

Spoiler

Orion SM Ignition

Orion SM Ignition

Spoiler

Trajectory

Trajectory

Spoiler

Coasting

Orion Coasting

Spoiler

Closest Approach - 507 km

Closest Approach - 507 km

Spoiler

SM Separation / RCS Jets fire to push Orion away from SM

RCS Fires to push Capsule away from SM

Spoiler

Re-entry

Re-entry

The re-entry angle was very steep (~45 degree angle) which caused Orion to go over 15 Gees.

Spoiler

Parachutes Deploy

Parachutes Deploy

Spoiler

Touchdown

Touchdown

Orion is safely back home.

 

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42 minutes ago, Munbro Kerman said:

Here is my take on EM-1: (Images in spoilers since they are huge)

  Hide contents

Sitting on the Pad

Sitting on Pad

  Hide contents

Engine Ignition / Liftoff

Engine Ignition

  Hide contents

Booster Separation

Booster Separation

  Hide contents

LES Jettison

LES Jettison

  Hide contents

First Stage Separation

First Stage Separation

  Hide contents

Fairing Deploy

Fairing Deploy

  Hide contents

Maneuver Node

Preparing Maneuver Node

  Hide contents

Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage Ignition

Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage Ignition

  Hide contents

Orion SM Ignition

Orion SM Ignition

  Hide contents

Trajectory

Trajectory

  Hide contents

Coasting

Orion Coasting

  Hide contents

Closest Approach - 507 km

Closest Approach - 507 km

  Hide contents

SM Separation / RCS Jets fire to push Orion away from SM

RCS Fires to push Capsule away from SM

  Hide contents

Re-entry

Re-entry

The re-entry angle was very steep (~45 degree angle) which caused Orion to go over 15 Gees.

  Hide contents

Parachutes Deploy

Parachutes Deploy

  Hide contents

Touchdown

Touchdown

Orion is safely back home.

 

can you put up a craft file download?

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2 hours ago, eagle92lightning said:

I am looking for a rocket that is easily modifiable and can lift a heavy payload. And well frankly your SLS looks extremely powerful and i love the Orion missions

Well let's see how powerful mine really is. Using some quick math, my SLS has around 9,676 kn of thrust, which is around 2,175,251 pounds of force (The real SLS will have almost 8.4 million pounds of thrust). Using this formula  {\text{TWR}}={\frac  {F_{T}}{m\cdot g}}>1  we can find the TWR. This rocket weighs about 600 tons, so we can plug in 9,676 for F_{T}  and 600 for m. Multiply m by surface gravity (g) which is 9.81 m/s squared. So multiply 600 by 9.81 and you get 5,886. Divide 5,886 by 9,676 and you will get a TWR of 1.64, so my SLS is pretty powerful, considering it's entire first stage has 12 orange tanks clipped together.

Anyways, enough of boring math, here is the link.

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8 minutes ago, Munbro Kerman said:

Well let's see how powerful mine really is. Using some quick math, my SLS has around 9,676 kn of thrust, which is around 2,175,251 pounds of force (The real SLS will have almost 8.4 million pounds of thrust). Using this formula  {\text{TWR}}={\frac  {F_{T}}{m\cdot g}}>1  we can find the TWR. This rocket weighs about 600 tons, so we can plug in 9,676 for F_{T}  and 600 for m. Multiply m by surface gravity (g) which is 9.81 m/s squared. So multiply 600 by 9.81 and you get 5,886. Divide 5,886 by 9,676 and you will get a TWR of 1.64, so my SLS is pretty powerful, considering it's entire first stage has 12 orange tanks clipped together.

Anyways, enough of boring math, here is the link.

thanks I can't wait to download it!

11 minutes ago, Munbro Kerman said:

Well let's see how powerful mine really is. Using some quick math, my SLS has around 9,676 kn of thrust, which is around 2,175,251 pounds of force (The real SLS will have almost 8.4 million pounds of thrust). Using this formula  {\text{TWR}}={\frac  {F_{T}}{m\cdot g}}>1  we can find the TWR. This rocket weighs about 600 tons, so we can plug in 9,676 for F_{T}  and 600 for m. Multiply m by surface gravity (g) which is 9.81 m/s squared. So multiply 600 by 9.81 and you get 5,886. Divide 5,886 by 9,676 and you will get a TWR of 1.64, so my SLS is pretty powerful, considering it's entire first stage has 12 orange tanks clipped together.

Anyways, enough of boring math, here is the link.

thats a LOT OF STRUTS!

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On 11/5/2016 at 7:48 AM, Munbro Kerman said:

Well let's see how powerful mine really is. Using some quick math, my SLS has around 9,676 kn of thrust, which is around 2,175,251 pounds of force (The real SLS will have almost 8.4 million pounds of thrust). Using this formula  {\text{TWR}}={\frac  {F_{T}}{m\cdot g}}>1  we can find the TWR. This rocket weighs about 600 tons, so we can plug in 9,676 for F_{T}  and 600 for m. Multiply m by surface gravity (g) which is 9.81 m/s squared. So multiply 600 by 9.81 and you get 5,886. Divide 5,886 by 9,676 and you will get a TWR of 1.64, so my SLS is pretty powerful, considering it's entire first stage has 12 orange tanks clipped together.

Anyways, enough of boring math, here is the link.

Who needs math, just add more boosters.

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