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[1.5.1] Kerbal Star Systems [v0.8.2] August 18, 2018


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The Mun is working fine for me, I have a base on it and the base has been fine for a Mun day. And the orbiter for one of my missions to said base has been fine from map view, although I will check on it.

EDIT: Orbiter was nowhere to be seen around the Mun, base was fine.

Edited by Saltshaker
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5 hours ago, Saltshaker said:

The Mun is working fine for me, I have a base on it and the base has been fine for a Mun day. And the orbiter for one of my missions to said base has been fine from map view, although I will check on it.

EDIT: Orbiter was nowhere to be seen around the Mun, base was fine.

That is the exact bug that we found. Anything landed on the Mun should be fine, but anything orbiting the Mun will eventually crash into it :P

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2 hours ago, Saltshaker said:

well yea you gave it an atmosphere :P

Well the atmosphere is only 10 km high, and 2.96*10^-15 atm (0.0000000000000296 atm), so anything orbiting within the atmosphere should be stable for at least hundreds of years before seeing any effects in the orbit. This is the case with all bodies with a tenuous atmosphere. The crashing is from Karkua. For example, orbiting Moho (0.0000000000011 atm) would keep a ship stable without crashing :P

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I decreased the exospheres to 1000m above the highest surface point. They don’t influence orbits and are interesting for temperature differences. Anyone with a base on the Mun should have noticed the extreme temperature differences.

The mun bug is caused by the gravity of Karkua. For some reason the game moves vessels to karkua where they get destroyed. 

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Kaptain’s Log, Kuly 24, 4097

Morning-

Croissants are bliss. I awoke earlier today to the sound of the native Cluckoos chirping outside. Looking at my watch, I realized I had about half a day until I had to board the Hyperion once again for a eight-month trip to Ora, one of the longest yet. Of course the longest trip that I endured was a sightseeing trip to Karkua... that was torture. Anyway, I headed downstairs for breakfast. I soon passed a couple from the Ussari Union, shouting to each other in Kyrillic. I wondered why two tourists from a relatively poor nation would be all the way out here, before pushing the thought aside. After having to negotiate in three languages to a bellhop, I was finally allowed into the hotel’s cafe. I was pounded by the sudden smell of breakfast cuisine from dozens of nations. I sat down with my plate loaded with a croissant, eggs, and Shnuugler bacon (curtesy of Al Kerman’s Xeno Slaughterhouse). I bit into my croissant, and felt like the entire universe was smiling. 

Midday-

 As I boarded my shuttle, along with the closest of my crew, I looked around. Passengers from hundreds of different cultures were boarding dozens of shuttles across the spaceport, all bound for the Hyperion. The Hyperion was a jewel (not Jool) amoung space liners. Large, as to accommodate up to 500 passengers. Luxurious, as to make the long trips pleasureable. Cheap, as to get many people to board. Powerful, as to go anywhere in the cluster. While many ships had at least one of these qualities, the Hyperion had them all. I heard the controller say that we had clearance, and suddenly the fleet of small shuttles lifted up, bound for the hangers of the Hyperion, newly cleaned and ready to care for its 423 passengers for this trip.

Evening-

“Passengers strapped in?”

”Yes sir.”

”Computer, engage throttle to 100%.”

We were gently pushed into our seats. For the next four months, we would enjoy .8gs while we coast toward the tropical paradise of Ora. Then, we would flip around and decelerate for four more months, before gently arriving in orbit. While we were in transit, the passengers would enjoy high quality food, many recreational activities, and meet and greets to make new friends. Doc wants to make sure everyone is healthy though. If one person catches a cold on this ship, so too will the whole ship. And I don’t want to be sneezing while piloting this monster. Engineers say the reactor is stable. Triti was playing with the power flow, trying to get the engines to have a higher thrust. While passengers were milling about in the artificial gravity, I was busy on the deck making sure everything was going smoothly. If something went horribly wrong after about 10 days from leaving orbit, we were royally screwed. There are large emergency decelerators, but that would only stop us. We would then have to make our way back to a spaceport and hope we don’t blow up. I was stressed. I could feel a headache building. Eight months...

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4 hours ago, Itsdavyjones said:

To know what The All is is to overload ones mind, we are too fragile to truly know what it truly is.  All we can do is make theories on what it may be.

It’s probably a large baked potato covered with a blanket.

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Computer Output, 00:21AM 7/30/97

Vessel info: KSL Hyperion. Passengers, 493

Running computer self check. Kell Inspire v.28, Nickname “Otto Pylot” 

Self check complete. 1 Virus detected.

File name, A11

Subfile name, CR34T0R

Virus type, malicious.

Erradicating,

Erradication failed.

Attempt two.

Erradication failed. 

Contacting virus deletion service.

Signal terminated.

Thrust to 0%

WARNING! ARTIFICIAL GRAVITY AT 0G

Orbit information: Orbiting the All

Beginning Hohmann Transfer to Creator

End log.

Edited by Cortwade
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Kaptain’s Log, Kuly 30, 4097

Midnight-

I was startled awake by the bright red light of an alarm in my cabin. Outside, I could hear the alarm. Bwooooeee! Bwoooeeee! I shifted to stand and change into my uniform. Probably some lieutenant got freaked out over a meteorite bumping the hull. However, as I shifted, I realized that I didn’t stop. It took my a second to realize I was floating in my cabin, various personal effects floating about. Something was seriously wrong. I pushed off a wall and promptly rammed into my door. It’s hard to move around a huge ship in Zero G... When I finally got out into the hallway, I bumped into my First Mate. He told me that they needed me in the bridge, and that the elevators aren’t working. I managed to get to the bridge after much bumping around. I was right, a lieutenant had pressed the alarm, but for a very serious reason. The crew in the bridge were all jumbled around the computer control interface. I asked them why, which startled them because they hadn’t seen me walk in.

”Kaptain, the computer has taken control of the ship. It’s locked us out as well. In addition, the engines are spooling up for a maneuver node in T-3 Hours.”

In response, I replied “Have you tried turning it off and on?”

Suddenly, Dunkirk Kerman burst through the doors. He was the onboard computer specialist. “Sir, you need to power down the ship! Engineering is reporting that the computer is allowing fumes from the reactor to seep into the air recirculation ducts!”

I pushed off whatever I could, and rammed my head into the emergency power down button.

Midday- 

I woke up strapped down to a table in the medical ward. I didn’t panic, this is just what happens in zero g when you have to lie down. I saw Doc and the corner, and shouted at him to come over. He said that the ship has been powered back up, but as soon as we did the engines fired. He told me that Medical Bay B was taking most of the injuries sustained by the sudden 1.2 Gs, and two people had died due to falling while floating down the stairwell to different decks. A few of the pilots say that the course was altered in a way similar to a Hohmann transfer. He also told me engineers are working on ripping re computer our and transferring to manual control. I tried to sit up, but Doc told me I needed to rest. Hitting the button with my head wound up tearing the scalp. That’s when I realized that my head felt strangely cold. Ugh...

Evening-

I was finally let out of the ward at about 2:45... nearly midnight. I didn’t feel tired, so I went to the bridge. There was a large gaping hole in the console and most of the monitors had blue screens. A sticky note on one of them stated, “Out of Order.” Strapped down in a corner was a piece of machinery that I believed was the computer kore. Engineers were over on one side, and when I asked, they said that they’re trying to restore manual control. The computer used most of our fuel, the engineers told me. It’s unlikely that we could do a direct transfer to another star. They did say, however, that it might be possible to get to one star system; Nessus.

Edited by Cortwade
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