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15 hours ago, NorthAmericanAviation said:

Took a quick peek at that, sounds cool! :cool:

SOMEONE LIKES MY STORIES!!!!! *fist pump*

15 hours ago, NorthAmericanAviation said:

Yes, you can certainly use all of my planes, just give credit where due, of course---for me, just throw in a link to https://kerbalx.com/NorthAmericanAviation. 

No problemo

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April 1956: Douglas F4D Skyray

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The F4D Skyray was built in response to a U.S. Navy requirement, circa 1947, for an interceptor that could climb to 50,000 feet in 5 minutes. The product was a beautifully flowing smooth-sided delta wing aircraft that served for only 8 years. Its namesake, of course, is a manta ray, due to its unique appearance.

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An advanced, lengthened, and more powerful design called the F5D "Skylancer" had been planned as a continuation. until 1970, two NASA owned F5D's were used for testing an 'ogival' wing and training pilots to fly the cancelled X-20.

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Replica Statistics

 

Builder: NAA Part Count: 39 Mass: 11.75 Tons Crew: 1
Service Ceiling: 23km Powerplant: 1x Whiplash Top Speed: Low Alt:350m/s Hi Alt: 1135m/s Dimensions: 11.9 x 10.9 x 3.7

The Skyray had a max speed of 722mph, or 322 m/s. This model has a similar top speed at low altitude and similar handling characteristics. It is a good candidate for a dedicated interceptor. Because of my engine choice, you can also super-cruise at 800m/s at up to 23,000m. Whoops.:confused:

 

Download Link:

https://kerbalx.com/NorthAmericanAviation/Douglas-F4D-Skyray

Tomorrow's Craft: Convair F-102 Delta Dagger

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April 1956: Convair F-102 Delta Dagger

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The Convair F-102 was a futuristic supersonic delta-winged (hence the name) interceptor, a versatile fighter that formed the backbone of the SAC from its introduction in 1956 through its retirement in 1976. In the early designs of the F-102, it was incapable of breaking Mach 1. However, when the fuselage was redesigned with aera ruling, the performance increased greatly. The area rule is a interesting application of transonic aerodynamics, stating that in order to limit drag, the total cross-sectional area should remain as constant as possible.

Image result for area rule graph f-102

The modified version of the F-102 was significantly more successful, and would go on to serve as a bomber-escort and ground-attack aircraft in Vietnam. The majority of service F-102s would go on to become target drones, developing the next generation of air-to-air missiles for the forthcoming fourth-generation fighters.

Image result for f-102

 

Replica Statistics:

Builder: Servo Mass: 16.3 Tons Part Count: 93 Crew:1
Top speed: 380m/s (660 in a dive) Service Ceiling: 13km Powerplant: 1x Panther + 1x Rapier Dimensions: 11.02 x 5.57 x 13.73 LHW

The F-102 is steady as a rock, and glides really well. I manged to take it to the edge of space thanks to the good acceleration from the combo-engine, and back down after a 56G maneuver.

Download Link:

https://kerbalx.com/servo/F-102-Delta-Dagger

Tomorrow's Craft:

Grumman F-11 Tiger

 

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May 1956: Grumman F-11 Tiger

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(expect a remake of this craft) Designed in the 1950’s, the Tiger is a carrier-based fighter aircraft built for the US Navy. Among its peers of the time, was somewhat out of place, as it landed hot for a carrier-based plane. It was replaced by the F-8 Crusader.

F11F_short_and_long_nose_at_NAS_Kingsvil

The idea for this aircraft began as an update for the F9F-6/7/8 series as the XF9F-9, but developed into a totally different aircraft, implementing an area-rule fuselage for more stable supersonic flight. It lived a short 11-year U.S. Navy service life from 1956 to 1967, and served as Blue Angels demonstration planes until 1969. Top speed was 727mph, or 325m/s.

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Replica Statistics

Builder: NAA Part Count: 24 Mass: 8.4 Tons Crew: 1
Service Ceiling: 23km Powerplant: 1x Panther Top Speed: Lo Alt: 350m/s Hi Alt: 823m/s Dimensions: 11.8 x 10.9 x 4.3 LWH

This version can do well over the proper/real top speed, making its supersonic flight characteristics more akin to the F-11-1F Super Tiger, which was a similar air-frame with a GE J-79 wedged in it as opposed to a Wright J-65 in regular Tigers. This model is physically alike and holds speed in a turn, maintaining 6 gees all day. the high altitude characteristics in this replica are a bit--well--optimistic.

 

Download Link:

https://kerbalx.com/NorthAmericanAviation/Grumman-F-11-Tiger

Tomorrow's Craft: North American F-107 Ultra Sabre

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If I remember right it was an F11F that was the first jet to shoot itself down, during flight tests. A rather...interesting story indeed.

Also, I'm loving the aircraft you guys have made, they look really good, especially compared to my builds. Keep up the good work

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September 1956: North American F-107A 'Ultra Sabre'

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The F-107, nicknamed Ultra Sabre, is the final evolution of the military track of Sabre aircraft from North American. Generally regarded positively, it lost the contract to the F-105 either through the fate of politics, or perhaps by being the ‘right plane at the wrong time’. Either way, most signs pointed to it being a better-handling plane, lacking only in bomb-armament. The F-107’s performance was indeed superior, due to the fact that it stemmed from an evolution of design alterations instead of being an entirely new plane altogether, as the Thunderchief was. It should be noted that project pilot Bob Baker thought this was a fine-handling aircraft.

F-107A-color-in-flight.jpgnorth-american-f-107a.gif

(In-Flight and Tri-Orthogonal View)

The use of antiquated conventional 500lb bombs in Vietnam is likely what caused the F-107 to lose out, because it was not intended to be retrofitted with conventional payloads, unlike the Thunderchief, which had provisions for wing-mounted bomb triplets. Both aircraft were designed, primarily, to deliver a Nuke Can bomb, the F-107 using a ‘lobbing’ technique, by dropping the bomb in the midst of an intense high speed pull-up. Despite the Top-mounted intake appearing to be aft of a low-pressure zone which could have caused air starvation to the engine, this did not happen due to how forward it was in relation to the fuselage-disturbed air.

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Replica Statistics

Builder: NAA Part Count: 52 Mass: 8.1 Tons Crew: 1
Service Ceiling: 16km Powerplant: 1x Panther Top Speed: 335 m/s Dimensions: 11.0 x 7.8 x 4.2 LWH

The “Ultra Sabre” was the first to employ a Variable Area Intake Duct (VAID), which regulated the volume of air entering the engine, a Pratt and Whitney J75-P-9, for more efficient and powerful combustion. The VAID system saw further use on the A-5, XB-70, and the design of the F-108. As previously mentioned, the F-107 proved very capable in flight, being able to perform rolls in supersonic flight, as well as reach Mach 2+.
For a prototype aircraft, the F-107 was remarkably well-polished. Air brakes are not replicated on this model, flaps do the job just fine.
“1” cycles afterburner, “2” toggles intake diverter.

 

Download Link:

https://kerbalx.com/NorthAmericanAviation/North-American-F-107-Ultra-Sabre

Tomorrow's Craft: Vought F8U Crusader

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Posted (edited)
On 3/6/2017 at 10:44 AM, TangerineSedge said:

If I remember right it was an F11F that was the first jet to shoot itself down, during flight tests. A rather...interesting story indeed.

Also, I'm loving the aircraft you guys have made, they look really good, especially compared to my builds. Keep up the good work

Thanks! Also---

here's a short article: http://www.aerofiles.com/tiger-tail.html

that is a heck of a story, all things considered...

Edited by NorthAmericanAviation

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On 3/6/2017 at 10:44 AM, TangerineSedge said:

If I remember right it was an F11F that was the first jet to shoot itself down, during flight tests. A rather...interesting story indeed.

Also, I'm loving the aircraft you guys have made, they look really good, especially compared to my builds. Keep up the good work

Quote

On Sep 21, 1956 Grumman test pilot Tom Attridge shot himself down in a graphic demonstration of two objects occupying the wrong place at the same time—one being a Grumman F11F-1 Tiger, the other a gaggle of its own bullets..
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That is a beautiful sentence right there. What really impressed me is that Attridge stayed with the plane all the way to the ground, and then survived.

 

 

March 1957: Vought F8U Crusader

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The Vought F8U (later F-8) Crusader was a supersonic naval fighter designed exclusively for operation from aircraft carriers. In order to combat the high landing speeds of other supersonic types, the F8U incorporated an unusual variable-incidence wing, which lowered takeoff and approach speed. The wing swivels upwards seven degrees, increasing the angle of attack and allowing easier shipboard operations.

Image result for f8u

The F8U, thanks to its unique time in weapons development, was the "Last of the Gunfighters", as it was the last U.S. fighter to rely primarily on its four 20mm cannon in dogfights. Most versions of the Crusader were equipped with a throat-rack (seen overlapping the navy insignia above) capable of holding four AIM-9 Sidewinder missiles. Early production Crusaders didn't carry wing pylons, but later models could carry bombs or missiles on the wing.

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Replica Statistics:

Builder: Servo Part Count: 149 Mass: 13.9 Tons Crew: 1
Top Speed: 340m/s Service Ceiling: 7km Powerplant: 2x Panther Dimensions: 16.19 x 6.16 x 12.48 LHW

The Crusader's iconic variable-incidence wing is recreated faithfully in this model. During takeoff, toggle the wing up to decrease takeoff speed, and when at speed, lower it back for transonic flight. On landing approach, raise the wing again to allow for stable flight at 50m/s.

Warning When the wing reconnects, the throttle is set to zero for some reason. Simply hit z to throttle back to full.

Instructions for Use:
1. On the runway, press 1 to decouple the wing. If it doesn’t snap into place by itself, press 3 to force it down. Once it snaps into place, press 3 again.
2. Press 9 and 0 to turn on the turbojets. Once at 45m/s pitch up to take off.
3. Once airborne, press 1 to detach the wing and 2 to raise it if necessary. Press 2 again to reset the mechanism.
4. On landing approach, decouple the wing with 1, then press 3 to lower the wing. Press 3 to reset the wing and approach and land at 50-60m/s.

5. Action Group 4 toggles the wing gloves (beneath the wing). They can be raised for visuals when the wing is up, but in order to lower the wing, toggle them back down again.

Download Link:

https://kerbalx.com/servo/Vought-F8U-Crusader

Tomorrow's Craft:

McDonnell F-101 Voodoo

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May 1957: McDonnell F-101 Voodoo  Ns6TWVg.png

The F-101 Voodoo was a long-range fighter-bomber capable of carrying nuclear weapons of its own while escorting nuclear bombers deep into enemy territory. The F-101 was a capable interceptor which broke many speed, time to altitude, and long-distance flight records. The Voodoo served extensively in Vietnam, and had a long career in the Tactical Air Command, as well as the Strategic Air Command, with some variants in service until 1979.

Image result for rf-101

The Voodoo was produced in two variants: The F-101 Fighter-bomber variant, and the FR-101 reconnaissance variant. Shown above is the RF-101, identified by its elongated nose and single pilot. RF-101s replaced the radar and machine guns in the nose with a series of cameras. As a result, FR-101s were vulnerable to both SAMs and enemy MiGs, and often required a fighter escort. The F-101 was the main production-line of the Voodoo. It carried an advanced radar system, as well as a second crewmember to operate it. It carried four machine guns, plus an internal missile bay capable of carrying four AIM-4 Falcon Missiles or two AIR-2 Genie nuclear air-to-air missiles.

  vzDJnIq.png

 

Replica Statistics:

Builder: Servo Part Count: 98 Mass: 17.5 Tons Crew: 2
Top Speed: 380m/s Service Ceiling: 10km Powerplant: 2x Panther Dimensions: 12.87 x 9.94 x 4.53 LWH

This particular craft is closer to the RF-101 than the F-101, thanks to the uniquely shaped nose (it was a more interesting design challenge). This replica is extremely maneuverable, and is very fun to fly around. My personal record was 38.4Gs in the F-101 (a record that will be broken by coming craft).

Download Link:

https://kerbalx.com/servo/F-101-Voodoo

Tomorrow's Craft:

K/C-135 Stratotanker

 

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Posted (edited)

June 1957: KC-135 Stratotanker

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The KC-135 has been the U.S. military’s primary aerial refueling tanker since it’s introduction to service in June of 1957. In it’s 60 years of service, the KC-135 has refueled strategic bombers over Vietnam, nuclear deterrents over the Eastern Bloc, the SR-71, as well as allowing for the globe-spanning bombing runs of the modern era. A trio of KC-135s refuel each B-2 as it makes its way from Missouri to the middle east.

c-135_title.jpg

Despite serving since the Vietnam War, the Stratotanker has seen a healthy number of upgrades to keep it in service. This particular model is a KC-135E, equipped with Pratt & Whitney TF-33 engines. The current model is the KC-135R, but I liked the engines more on the E version. The Stratotanker will remain the go-to tanker aircraft for the next few years, when it will be replaced by the KC-46 Pegasus.

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Replica Statistics:

Builder: Servo Part Count: 392 Mass: 100.3 tons Crew: 2
Top Speed: 220m/s Service Ceiling: 7km Powerplant: 24x Wheesley Dimensions: 40.47 x 38.68 x 12.04 LWH

This KC-135 comes equipped with an aerial refueling boom that can be used to refuel any craft with an upward-facing jr. docking port. The Stratotanker is stable at a variety of speeds and altitudes, thanks to the strong dihedral and high angle of attack of the wings. This lets the plane to be refueled approach and dock without needing to stationkeep with the stratotanker.

In order to deploy the boom, use 0 to toggle the boom vanes up or down, then use 1 to detach the boom. It should redock automatically. If not, switch to the boom, toggle the vanes up and try again.

Download Link:

https://kerbalx.com/servo/KC-135-Stratotanker

Tomorrow's Craft:

Lockheed F-104 Starfighter

Edited by Servo

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Posted (edited)

February 1958: Lockheed F-104 Starfighter

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The F-104 was the next fighter in the Century Series. It featured a sleek fuselage and small wings leading pilots to alternately nickname it the missile with a man and widowmaker. Despite this, it became a staple export fighter, as it was in service up to the mid-200s.

Replica Statistics

Builder: Servo Part Count: 71 Mass: 14.7 tons Crew: 1
Top Speed: 1100m/s Service Ceiling: 20km Powerplant: 1x Rapier + 1x Panther Dimensions: 14.49 x 6.64 x 4.0 LWH

My replication can punch through Mach 2 in level flight at sea level, and has enough range to circumnavigate Kerbin (provided you fill up all the tanks first). Optimum performance comes with only the two tanks above the wings filled. In this configuration, it can reach the North Pole of Kerbin (barely).

Download Link:

https://kerbalx.com/servo/F-104-Starfighter

Tomorrow's Craft:

Republic F-105 Thunderchief

Edited by Servo

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Posted (edited)

May 1958: Republic F-105 Thunderchief

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The Republic F-105 Thunderjet, or the "Thud" as it was affectionately known, was a major backbone of the U.S. air force and Tactical Air Command throughout the 1950's and 1960's. It was designed from the outset both as a capable fighter and as a bomber capable of carrying nuclear bombs inside its internal weapons bays. The F-105 was the largest single-engine, single-pilot combat aircraft in history, though two-seat fighter-bomber versions would become more common.

Image result for f-105

Perhaps the most famous role for the F-105 was as a "Wild Weasel" aircraft. It replaced the F-100 in the role, with the goal of seeking out and destroying enemy radar stations. Pilots would bait enemy surface-to-air missile systems into trying to lock onto their aircraft with their radar. Pilots could then locate the radar station and destroy them with air-to-ground missiles. Given the dangerous nature of such a mission, shortly after F-105s ended production, F-105 squadrons began running out of F-105s at an alarming rate. F-4s would ultimately take over the role in 1964. Nowadays, the F-16 fulfills the Wild Weasel role.

  NVTZvZy.png

Replica Statistics:

Builder: Servo Part Count: 75 Mass: 16.7 tons Crew: 2
Service Ceiling: 10km Top Speed: 380m/s Powerplant: 1x Rapier + 1x Panther Dimensions:14.5 x 9.34 x 4.93

There isn't much to say about this replica other than that it's a solid plane that flies well.

Download Link:

https://kerbalx.com/servo/F-105-Thunderchief

Tomorrow's Craft:

North American F-108 Rapier

Edited by Servo

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December 1958: North American F-108 Rapier

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The North American F-108 project was a sister project to the XB-70 Mach 3+ bomber, supposedly designed to be an escort. The design of the aircraft was highly advanced for the time of its conception, and even though the program was cancelled in 1959, the gathered data were used in the design of the A-5 Vigilante to give it more favorable supersonic flight characteristics.

BI233448.jpg

(Image from Boeing) Because the Rapier was developed jointly with the Valkyrie, it shared similarities in crucial build aspects, such as its power-plant: the Rapier used two YJ-93 jet engines, a third the count of its bomber/research counterpart. If the thrust-to-weight rating of 5:1 in the Valkyrie is any measure, this design of engine certainly had a lot of potential.

kUa2mN8.png

Replica Statistics

Builder: NAA Part Count: 85 Mass: 26.4 Tons Crew: 1
Service Ceiling: 26km Powerplant: 2x Whiplash Top Speed: 1370 m/s Dimensions: 21.1 x 13.9 x 6.3

This replica is slightly down scaled and has touchy controls, but is very capable in both altitude and speed, reaching 30,000m apogee after flame-out. Otherwise, super cruise at around 20,000m is ideal, at up to top speed. ‘Caps Lock controls’ recommended once supersonic, does not take well to rolls, might make a re-release with additional vertical stabilizers not shown here.

 

Download Link:

https://kerbalx.com/NorthAmericanAviation/North-American-XF-108-Rapier

Tomorrow's Craft: Convair F-106 Delta Dart

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June 1959: Convair F-106 Delta Dart

UfQJE7P.png

The Convair F-106 was originally designated the F-102B, and was designed to replace the last second-generation fighters in the U.S. arsenal. Although it looks very similar, the F-106 is an almost completely new aircraft from the F-102. The program was almost scrapped due to schedule and budget overruns, as well as performance shortcomings. Fortunately for Convair, the program was completed, and an extremely advanced all-weather interceptor that defined U.S. squadrons through the 1980s.

F-106 Delta Dart 5th IS.JPEG

The F-106 was outfitted with the most advanced weaponry and electronics. Its Hughes MA-1 system controlled the aircraft's radar and weapons to automatically lock on and destroy targets, with a selection of Falcon anti-air missiles, a cannon, and a pair of Genie unguided nuclear rockets.

 

Replica Statistics:

Builder: Servo Part Count: 95 Mass: 15.6tons Crew: 2
Top Speed: 400m/s Service Ceiling: 7km Powerplant: 1x Panther + 1x Rapier Dimensions: 14.35 x 9.57 x 5.11 LWH

Download Link:

https://kerbalx.com/servo/F-106-Delta-Dart

Tomorrow's Craft:

Northrop F-5 Freedom Fighter

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July 1959: Nortrop F-5 Freedom Fighter/F-5E Tiger II

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The F-5 was a small, light fighter developed from Northrop’s T-38 Talon jet trainer. It was designed to be fast, maneuverable, and capable of surprising opponents before they could get a radar lock on the F-5. The F-5’s main appeal was its low price tag and low maintenance costs. Because of this, the F-5 was extremely popular as an export fighter. It saw service in the air forces of over 35 nations during its service life, and was developed into many different versions, including the F-5E Tiger II, RF-5E Tigereye, and F-20 Tigershark.

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Despite the prolific foreign service, probably the most famous role that the F-5 would play was as stand-ins for the fictional MiG-28s in Top Gun. In order to compliment my F-14 tomcat, this F-5 is also in 1:1 scale, and has a comparable performance and top speed.

TSGggPp.gif

Replica Statistics:

Builder: Servo Part Count: 79 Mass: 10.9 tons Crew: 1
Top Speed: 300m/s Service Ceiling: 8km Powerplant: 1x Panther Dimensions: 14.67 x 8.2 x 4.43

This replica has the ability to shift fuel to transfer between hypermaneuverability and stable flight by moving the contents of a single fuel tank. It glides well and lands really easy, provided that you come in fast enough.

Download Link:

https://kerbalx.com/servo/F-5-Freedom-Fighter

Tomorrow's Craft:

Martin P6M Seamaster

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Posted (edited)

August 1959: Martin P6M SeaMaster

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The P6M Seamaster was the last aircraft built by Martin before ICBM’s became the weapon platform of choice for long range attacks. This Aircraft was designed during the Height of SAC (Strategic Air Command) influence, intended to convoy with submarines and patrol boats to set up mobile bases with the idea that they would be hard to track. This aircraft made stunning first impressions; it was 50 feet longer than its predecessor, the P5M, and outweighed the massive Mars by 25 tons! Its slender hull/fuselage and T-tail made it iconic, and instantly recognizable, along with a pronounced anhedral wing, used to rest pontoons on the water.

martin-p6m-seamaster-flying-boat.jpgp6mlineart.gif

Initially intended to use a Curtiss-Wright turbo-ramjet prototype for a powerplant, Martin instead used Allison J-71’s, which were lacking in power and due to their placement would scorch and damage the aft section of fuselage. Later, the P6M-2 used Pratt & Whitney J-75-T-2 engines, outputting 17,500 ft/lbs of thrust each, totaling 70,000 ft-lbs of gross thrust using four engines in pods of two, each pod exhaust now angled outboard 5 degrees. The original Seamasters beached with an external set of pontoons, which could deploy their own landing gear once attached. Taxiing tests on open waters revealed that the hull WAS indeed strong enough to endure six to nine-foot swells. First liftoff occurred on July 14th, 1955 over the Chesapeake Bay.

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The Seamaster was the first aircraft designed to maintain high speed at sea-level altitude. The bomb bay (not modeled) is sealed by air pressure, making it watertight. An initial order of 30 aircraft was placed, but supplying the aircraft with fuel and armament proved difficult, and soon the orders dwindled. Additionally, the rise of the ICBM meant that long-range nuclear attacks no longer required a separate carrier aircraft. This lead to the end of the contract, and Martin sought development in long-range missile technology, leaving aircraft design and engineering behind.

Replica Statistics

Builder: NAA Part Count: 132 Mass: 55.9 Tons Crew: 2
Service Ceiling: 12km Powerplant: 4x Panther Top Speed: 175 m/s Level Flight Dimensions: 34.2 x 29.4 x 8.6 LWH

Takeoff Procedure: Full throttle, flaps optional. Rotate around 40m/s.
[Normally I use Hyper-Edit to get the thing in the water, given its lack of Landing Gear]
Landing procedure: Flaps down/engaged, vertical speed < -10m/s, forward speed < 65m/s.
I have made it to 270m/s in a steep dive, and left plenty of fuel reserves for long-duration flights
NOTE: Controls are rather sensitive, given the combination of a very forward center of lift and an anhedral wing.
Action Groups: “1” toggles afterburner, “2” toggles flaps

Download Link:

https://kerbalx.com/NorthAmericanAviation/Martin-P6M-Seamaster

Tomorrow's Craft: North American T-2 Buckeye

Edited by NorthAmericanAviation

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November 1959: North American T-2 "Buckeye"

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The T-2, introduced in 1959, served to train student naval aviators for nearly 50 years until its retirement in 2008, being succeeded by the T-45 Goshawk, a licensed and modified BAE Hawk.

T2-formation-01.jpg

Buckeyes originally came with one Westinghouse J34, but in the T-2B was replaced with two Pratt & Whitney J60 engines. The final non-export version used two General Electric J85 engines, designation T-2C. The T-2D and E were sold to the Venezuelan and Hellenic Air Forces, respectively. They remain in active service in the latter.

9NondMm.png

Replica Statistics

Builder: NAA Part Count: 56 Mass: 8.2 Tons Crew: 2
Service Ceiling: 11km Powerplant: 4x Juno (Thrust Limited) Top Speed: 290m/s Dimensions: 9.2 x 10.2 x 4.4 LWH

This model is no beauty queen, but neither is the real plane. it’s easy to fly, easy to land, hard to lose control of, just as it is in real life. It is an excellent trainer for subsonic flight and KSP newbies, if so desired. This model also has a trailing wheel to prevent engine-strikes, as well, but was removed for pictures. Slow landing and takeoff speeds in the range of 60m/s can be expected.

 

Download Link:

https://kerbalx.com/NorthAmericanAviation/North-American-T-2-Buckeye

Tomorrow's Craft: Convair B-58 Hustler AND GAM-77 Hound Dog Missile

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March 1960: Convair B-58 Hustler

m2e776a.png

Designed to be a low-altitude supersonic bomber, the Hustler was an idea heavily supported by the SAC (Strategic Air Command) and easily fulfilled this role by being capable of sustained Mach 2+ flight.

For its time, the avionics in the B-58 were rather advance; a combination of pilot skill and terrain guidance meant that constant low level flight could be achieved, even at maximum thrust from the four GE J79s.

c265dceaa118e62513e1bf5c85856897.jpg

Despite all this the B-58 was not easy to fly—Differential thrust issues upon flame-out, very specific and high angle of attack at subsonic speeds, fuel sloshing changing the center of mass, and general unwieldiness plagued the supersonic, lawn-dart-shaped plane. Given these characteristics, though, B-58 pilots made great selections for SR-71 pilots given their experience with the low-tolerance, high-performance nature of large supersonic aircraft. The B-58 even served as a Hughes radar testbed for the F-12 (sister program to the RS-71), Who Knew!

JmCmoF9.png

Replica Statistics

Builder: NAA Part Count: 158 Mass: 29.7 Tons Crew: 2
Service Ceiling: 15km Powerplant: 4x Panther (gimbal locked) Top Speed: 535m/s Dimensions: 20.6 x 12.2 x 8.0 LWH

This model shares all the aforementioned characteristics, although it is much more forgiving in terms of stability.
(I chose to make the engines larger because Junos suck.)

 

Download Link:

https://kerbalx.com/NorthAmericanAviation/Convair-B-58-Hustler

 

September 1960: North American GAM-77 "Hound Dog" Cruise Missile

VnklcpM.png

Designed to be launched from a B-52, the Hound Dog was an early standoff cruise missile Designed by North American in 1959. The Hound Dog was developed on the SM-64 Navaho missile. The GAM-77’s namesake is Elvis Presley’s song of the same monicre.

Agm-28_1.jpg

The design of the Hound Dog being parasitic to a B-52 was very conventional; the idea of a self-contained long-range missile with no launch vehicle or a disposable launch stage would follow this style of design once the use of rocket fuels was reliable and powerful enough to launch heavy nuclear/explosive payloads. This model contains only ballast so apply payloads as you see fit, although this missile is more of a decorative piece as it is hard to aim.

Replica Statistics

Builder: NAA Part Count: 23 Mass: 12.7 Tons
Powerplant: 1x Whiplash Launch Altitude: < 1km Payload: Base Ballistic

Download Link:

https://kerbalx.com/NorthAmericanAviation/North-American-GAM-77-Hound-Dog

Tomorrow's Craft: McDonnell F-4 Phantom II

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The Hustler was that plane that had a bunch of extra fuel and a nuke in that bottom pod, and when it got over moscow or leningrad or whereve, It would drop the droptank-nuke combo, right?

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29 minutes ago, Rath said:

The Hustler was that plane that had a bunch of extra fuel and a nuke in that bottom pod, and when it got over moscow or leningrad or whereve, It would drop the droptank-nuke combo, right?

Sure was! Here's a very in-depth article on the plane and its systems: www.aviation-history.com/convair/b58.html

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@DarkOwl57, your time has come - two days early, to boot.

December 1960: McDonnell Douglass F-4 Phantom II

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The F-4 Phantom II was a Mach 2.2 fighter aircraft developed by McDonnell Douglas in 1958. It served for over 30 years in the Air Force, Navy, and Marine Corps in many roles, most famously the anti-scud Wild Weasel squadrons. There they would attempt to outrun and outmaneuver enemy ground-to-air missiles in the Gulf War, while destroying enemy radar installments.

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These squadrons would use such tactics as provoking enemy SAM launchers to fire radar-seeking missiles in order to allow other aircraft to locate and destroy the stations. In all roles, the F-4 would serve in the Air Force, Marine Corps, and Navy, proving itself a very versatile and formidable fighter.

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Replica Statistics:

Builder: Servo Part Count: 71 Mass: 14.0 tons Crew: 2
Top speed: 380m/s Service Ceiling: 8km Powerplant: 2x Panther Dimensions: 12.75 x 9.84 x 4.49 LWH

This Phantom is a bit sluggish, thanks to the odd shape and KSP's aerodynamics model. I imagine that it would fly quite nicely in FAR, though.

Download Link:

https://kerbalx.com/servo/F-4-Phantom-II

Tomorrow's Craft:

Northrop T-38 Talon

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On 3/14/2017 at 10:47 AM, Servo said:

July 1959: Nortrop F-5 Freedom Fighter/F-5E Tiger II

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The F-5 was a small, light fighter developed from Northrop’s T-38 Talon jet trainer. It was designed to be fast, maneuverable, and capable of surprising opponents before they could get a radar lock on the F-5. The F-5’s main appeal was its low price tag and low maintenance costs. Because of this, the F-5 was extremely popular as an export fighter. It saw service in the air forces of over 35 nations during its service life, and was developed into many different versions, including the F-5E Tiger II, RF-5E Tigereye, and F-20 Tigershark.

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Despite the prolific foreign service, probably the most famous role that the F-5 would play was as stand-ins for the fictional MiG-28s in Top Gun. In order to compliment my F-14 tomcat, this F-5 is also in 1:1 scale, and has a comparable performance and top speed.

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Replica Statistics:

Builder: Servo Part Count: 79 Mass: 10.9 tons Crew: 1
Top Speed: 300m/s Service Ceiling: 8km Powerplant: 1x Panther Dimensions: 14.67 x 8.2 x 4.43

This replica has the ability to shift fuel to transfer between hypermaneuverability and stable flight by moving the contents of a single fuel tank. It glides well and lands really easy, provided that you come in fast enough.

Download Link:

https://kerbalx.com/servo/F-5-Freedom-Fighter

Tomorrow's Craft:

Martin P6M Seamaster

I love this jet first landing at old airfeild with it!

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March 1961: Northrop T-38 Talon

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The Northrop T-38 Talon is one of the most widespread training aircraft in the world. It was introduced in 1961 as a variant of Northrop’s extremely successful F-5 program, and the similarities to the F-5 are obvious. The two main differences between the F-5 and the T-38 are the second seat for instructors and the lack of hardpoints for weapons/drop tanks. The Talon was the first supersonic jet trainer, and as such, has trained many future fighter pilots and astronauts.

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The T-38 has seen service in the fleets of the USAF, SAC, NASA, and six countries. It will likely remain the jet trainer of choice for many years to come, likely flying for well over sixty years.

Replica Statistics:

Builder: Servo Part count: 82 Crew: 2 Mass: 12.0 tons
Top speed: 400m/s Service Ceiling: 9km Powerplant: 1x Panther Dimensions: 14.67 x 8.2 x 4.45 LWH

True to its role as a supersonic trainer, the T-38 can edge its way above the sound barrier at 5km altitude, and handles really well.

Download Link:

https://kerbalx.com/servo/T-38-Talon

Tomorrow's Craft:

North American A-5 Vigilante

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June 1961: North American A-5 Vigilante

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The A-5 was initially intended to replace the Douglas A-3, is a Mach 2+ reconnaissance and attack aircraft. Weighing in at 32,000lbs, it’s a big, heavy plane to launch from a carrier, not to mention its design calling for supersonic cruise—a trait not easily adapted to a carrier-borne aircraft of this size at this time.

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The A-5 used instruments, housings, and design elements developed for the F-108 Rapier, as well as the VAID (Variable Air Intake Duct) system implemented on the F-107.

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A reconnaissance and electronic warfare specific evolution, the RA-5C, saw heavy use in Vietnam as part of ELINT operations. it employed a side-sweeping radar and an infrared line scanner, crucial in strategic/strike attacks, despite never carrying any weaponry. It also carried a primitive digital computer, called Versatile Digital Analyzer, or VERDAN to run all the instrumentation.

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Replica Statistics

Builder: NAA Part Count: 44 Mass: 21.2 Tons Crew: 1
Service Ceiling: 24.5km Powerplant: 2x Panther Top Speed: 960m/s Dimensions: 15.4 x 10.0 x 5.6 LWH

This model flies very well and is so agile, in fact, I turn the pitch control limits down to 70. For realistic speed, set the thrust limit at 50%, but otherwise this is a super-fun high-flyer; in the configuration everything is in upon download, it’s turned up to 11. 1 toggles afterburner.

 

Download Link:

https://kerbalx.com/NorthAmericanAviation/North-American-A-5-Vigilante

Tomorrow's Craft: Grumman A-6 Intruder

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