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TRAPPIST-1 now has seven planets. (Possible life?)

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55 minutes ago, ProtoJeb21 said:

I think it may be a bit too early to reveal this...but there might be an EIGHTH planet of Trappist-1.

Oooh, can you elaborate? 

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1 hour ago, Cabbink said:

Saw the is on EE. It orbits far, Like h, right? Do you know how big it is, or what it's composition might be?

 

17 minutes ago, Spaceception said:

Oooh, can you elaborate? 

Okay, so with the new publicly available SFF data for Trappist-1, EE user shutcheon was able to analyze the possibility of more planets. He found two possible signals orbiting every 41 and 42 days. I did a further analysis, and the 42-day signal is the most likely to exist, with a sigma value of 7. It's a small, cold world of only about 0.70 (+/-0.03) RE with a temperature of 121oK. 

Speaking of more Trappist planets, there's also the possibility of gas/ice giants (I think ice giants) in the system as well.

https://phys.org/news/2017-09-trappist-earth-like-planets-gas-giant.html

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20 minutes ago, ProtoJeb21 said:

Speaking of more Trappist planets, there's also the possibility of gas/ice giants (I think ice giants) in the system as well.

https://phys.org/news/2017-09-trappist-earth-like-planets-gas-giant.html

Well keep searching! I think, with how the resonances are, there could be another planet at either 53, 64 or 90 days. Remember to check for that. Good luck finding More! :rep:

Edited by Cabbink

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It turns out that, due to sunspots and other stellar activity, the 7 Trappist-1 planets are about 8% SMALLER than originally calculated. In addition, their masses appear more likely to be those given by the initial announcement.

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1711.05691.pdf

Below are the newly calculated physical parameters for the planets based off of the information in the article above.

  • THEROS/B: 0.99912 RE, 0.7082 ME, 3.915 g/cm3, 0.7093752g.
  • AUXO/C: 0.96968 RE, 1.158 ME, 7.00278 g/cm3, 1.2314936g.
  • THALLO/D: 0.71024 RE, 0.34395 ME, 5.29 g/cm3, 0.6818304g.
  • EIAR/E: 0.84456 RE, 0.5242 ME, 4.797 g/cm3, 0.7347672g.
  • IRENE/F: 0.9614 RE, 0.5776 ME, 3.5841 g/cm3, 0.62491g.
  • CARPHOS/G: 1.03684 RE, 1.137 ME, 5.624 g/cm3, 1.0575768g.
  • CHEIMON/H: 0.65504 RE. No mass is given, but I estimated a mass of 0.10685 ME based on differences between Study 1 and Study 2 masses for the six TRAPPIST planets. This gives Cheimon a density of 2.096 g/cm3 and a gravity of 0.249023 gees.

These results are incredibly important. Not only can the uncertainties caused by red dwarf activity be applied to many Exoplanet Explorers candidates, it gives more insight to the composition of these planets. All but two of the Trappist worlds - Theros and Irene - appear to be pure rock and iron planets, similar to Earth. Thallo and Auxo are likely iron-rich, while Eiar and Carphos seem close in composition to Earth. Theros and Irene have Mars-like densities, implying that about 15-20% of their total mass is water. That, or one or both of the planets have NO iron whatsoever and are 5-10% water by mass. Either way, I'm going to have to do a LOT of revamps of the TRAPPIST-1 system for Interstellar Adventure Revived.

Edited by ProtoJeb21

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Is Thallo bring iron rich good for potential habitability? Possibility of a strong magnetic field/tectonic plates (if tidal heating is significant enough), and many ores near the surface, probably a good place for intelligent life to develop. 

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48 minutes ago, Spaceception said:

Is Thallo bring iron rich good for potential habitability? Possibility of a strong magnetic field/tectonic plates (if tidal heating is significant enough), and many ores near the surface, probably a good place for intelligent life to develop. 

It would be a great mining planet and may be rich in life-supporting metals (molybdenum, selenium, etc). However, keep in mind that the error bars for all the planets' densities are ridiculously high. Damn noisy stars. 

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