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6 minutes ago, Ignath said:

Sure looked like if they didn't LTS that booster that it may have been able to make it...

It would be awesome :) But... it might be artifact of transmission, but the top of the booster looked... bent... after the separation?

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2 minutes ago, MinimumSky5 said:

What is it with these tests and the camera operators? Do they deliberately turn the camera away during the most important stages of flight?

Those shots were from a jet (WB-57), amazed they were as good as they were.

 

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6 minutes ago, .50calBMG said:

I think the booster actually survived that flip, that was too fast an explosion to be an aerodynamic breakup. 

It was no flip it was far to early for it, if they tried to reuse it. they would have to relight the rocket to climb higher, drop the second stage and do an boostback. 
However the abort will push more stress on the rocket than standard so they would need to scarp it anyway, they could reuse engines and avionic however. 

Now it might be an termination or it could be atmospheric breakup. They had telemetry after the fireball who indicate breakup 
 

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There's no way that booster would have survived a supersonic flip. The upper stage looked like it was losing some liquid (iirc water?) after the separation. It probably triggered autodestruction when it sensed it was about to flip/upper stage started leaking.

Edit: Okay, I rewatched it and I don't know why I got the impression the upper stage was leaking, but if I was to guess I would say it was the first thing to happen. There was some sort of white trail.

Edited by Wjolcz
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Farewell B1046

2018-2020

  • First Block 5 booster
  • First Block 5 booster to fly twice
  • First booster of any kind to fly 3 times
  • First booster to fly from all 3 SpaceX launch pads
  • Launched first Bangladeshi satellite
  • Last test of the Crew Dragon capsule before crew
  • 4 flights... 100% successful

NfqWchA.png

 

That was quite the show.

Edited by ThatGuyWithALongUsername
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And now, the news:

 

Kerbal Newscaster: "No Kerbals were lost during this flight.. and what is were the kerbals response ?"

Jebidian: "Now that is an E-ticket Ride!"

Bill: Kerman "WHEE!EEEEEEEEEE!!!!!!!!!!!!!"

Bob:Kerman  "Uh, Is this thing safe? .. Yeah, Guess it is!!!! (Chuckles)

Gene Kerman: Pak it in boys, we're back in business!

Elon Kerman:  "See told you the Game would  say  it would work... and it did!"

Me: "Oooooh pretty explosion, Rocket Go BOOMSKI! and look it lloks fine to me YAAAAAYYYY!"

Space_Coyote

 

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1 hour ago, Brotoro said:

This was much more satisfying than the Orion abort test that just dropped the capsule into the drink.

That was an drop test not an abort, Dragon has also done them. then lots of parachute tests but then they used an box rather than an capsule since it could be designed to land on ground and was cheaper. 

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Some takeaways from the post-flight press conference.

  • Hardware for DM-2 will probably be ready sometime in February, but the flight itself won't happen until a bit later due to necessary checks/scheduling.
  • This test doesn't really have applications outside of commercial crew.
  • Whether DM-2 will be short duration or long duration is TBD.
  • NASA is still planning to purchase another Soyuz seat.
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13 minutes ago, Wjolcz said:

 

Very nice, it looks like the rocket started leaking shortly after separation. Or is this an drag effect like contrails? 
It increases until the explosion and you have something moving ahead from the dying fireball, at first I thought this was the capsule but that was already out of frame. 
Everyday astronaut saw the fireball in his side vision and was not sure what was going on. 

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2 hours ago, magnemoe said:

Very nice, it looks like the rocket started leaking shortly after separation. Or is this an drag effect like contrails? 
It increases until the explosion and you have something moving ahead from the dying fireball, at first I thought this was the capsule but that was already out of frame. 
Everyday astronaut saw the fireball in his side vision and was not sure what was going on. 

Someone upthread mentioned the rocket looking “bent,” I think what happened is the joint between the first and second stages partially failed, and the upper first stage tank (LOX?) began venting. The “bent” bit is the intact second stage still hanging on, which survives the first stage explosion and is seen emerging from the fireball. 
 

Was there ever any concrete word on whether it broke up itself or the FTS fired? Like someone else said, that sure looked like an FTS event...

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48 minutes ago, CatastrophicFailure said:

Someone upthread mentioned the rocket looking “bent,” I think what happened is the joint between the first and second stages partially failed, and the upper first stage tank (LOX?) began venting. The “bent” bit is the intact second stage still hanging on, which survives the first stage explosion and is seen emerging from the fireball. 
 

Was there ever any concrete word on whether it broke up itself or the FTS fired? Like someone else said, that sure looked like an FTS event...

Suspect It could be the top of upper stage like the top of starship pressurization, second stage is significantly weaker than first as it only has to hold the payload and fairing. Some suggestion that current second stage can not handle an full falcon heavy maximum payload of 60 tons. 
First stage has to hold the weight of second stage and payload during max acceleration. 

They commented on loosing telemetry with first stage some time after explosion, I don't think they comment on that if it was terminated, trajectory also looked nominal. 
This also indicates that the engine compartment survived the explosion. Makes some sense as the rear bulkhead is the most sturdy part of the rocket. 

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