MedwedianPresident

My grandfather visited Hollow Earth in 1952. He took a picture.

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Posted (edited)

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In 1952, my grandfather and several of his mates decided to follow the footsteps of Admiral Byrd (whom they knew) and flew to the North Pole in a decommissioned bomber. They claim that they found a hole that leads to Hollow Earth there; they entered it and were contacted by the residents of Hollow Earth. They flew for several hours before they landed in an Agarthan city, where they spent three days. When they returned, their friends noticed that they somewhat grew taller during the expedition and their clothes glowed in the night for several weeks.

My grandfather (who piloted the plane most of the time) took this picture several hours after passing through the polar hole. Even though the quality is bad, a tundra landscape and the further away parts of the Inner Earth can be seen in the background. There is a river in the right part of the picture; my grandfather claimed that it was over a kilometer thick.

My granddad often saw UFO's, especially silver discs, after his expedition. He even told me that he was abducted once and talked to Grey-like figures about his trip to Agartha. While he was visiting our house, we also noticed strange things; I saw unnatural lights during a late night barbecue on his birthday, for example. My grandfather went missing five years ago. The last message he sent me was the following:

"They are taking me to them now. I will return to Agartha now as I promised sixty years ago. Seek the truth, my dearest grandson."

Note that he never drank a single drop in his life and stayed entirely healthy until his disappearance. He even beat my father in a foot race once. Our doctor even commended him that he was as healthy as a 40-year-old at the age of 96.

What do you think?

Edited by MedwedianPresident
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Nice tale, but this is defintely one of the worst places to post it on the internet...

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13 minutes ago, MedwedianPresident said:

Note that he never drank a single drop in his life and stayed entirely healthy until his disappearance. He even beat my father in a foot race once. Our doctor even commended him that he was as healthy as a 40-year-old at the age of 96.

Delusional people can still be physiologically fit.

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Posted (edited)

18 minutes ago, MedwedianPresident said:

What do you think?

You do not want to know what I think.
And if I did tell you I would probably get banned for insulting.

Edited by Tex_NL
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What do I think? I think this does not belong in the science sub. And so, moved. 

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1 hour ago, MedwedianPresident said:

What do you think?

I don't think. Some say, that's my main problem ... :-)

Apart from that, nice story. Psst, must have been a hole in the water ...

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Nice story, bruh. Supported by atrociously awful "photo" taken with a salvaged XVIII century camera obscura.

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5 minutes ago, Scotius said:

*snip* "photo" taken with a salvaged XVIII century camera obscura.

I thought the same. But it fits perfectly to the story :-)

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Im not sure if i should believe this, but damn, something does not have to be believed in order to be interesting.

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1 hour ago, MedwedianPresident said:

What do you think?

Silly. If the trip from the outer surface to the inner surface was a matter of merely "they entered it," rather than a weeks long trek through an enormous vertical cave, then the thickness of the Earth's thin shell would be tiny, and its density would have to be far, far greater than we observe in common earthmoving operations.

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There is a movie of grandpa's trip. 

 

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39 minutes ago, HebaruSan said:

Silly. If the trip from the outer surface to the inner surface was a matter of merely "they entered it," rather than a weeks long trek through an enormous vertical cave, then the thickness of the Earth's thin shell would be tiny, and its density would have to be far, far greater than we observe in common earthmoving operations.

There are major holes at the poles with sides covered in water, allowing for planes or ships to pass into Agartha, albeit experiencing strange anomalies such as a period of near-zero-G. This is what my grandfather said.

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2 minutes ago, MedwedianPresident said:

There are major holes at the poles with sides covered in water, allowing for planes or ships to pass into Agartha, albeit experiencing strange anomalies such as a period of near-zero-G. This is what my grandfather said.

Your grandfather's fantasy was inconsistent with basic Newtonian physics. (The entire inner volume would experience zero g.)

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I do not approve.

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At least this is not flat earth crap...

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1 hour ago, MedwedianPresident said:

This is what my grandfather said.

This would be your grandfather, who was either delusional or (more likely) just pulling your leg.

There are a lot of physical reasons why "hollow Earth" is impossible, as has been pointed out in this thread.  What your grandfather describes is physically impossible:

  • Gravity would be zero inside such a hollow shell.
  • The hollowness of the shell would require the shell itself to be improbably dense.
  • For an Earth-sized, Earth-mass planet to be a hollow shell and not collapse under its own weight, it would have to be improbably strong.
  • Even if you could have a hyper-dense, hyper-strong hollow shell, and if you can ignore the zero-gravity-inside problem, then if there's an opening to the interior, we'd all be dead.  Because our atmosphere would all drain down into the interior and we'd be sucking vacuum.
  • And in any case, we do in fact know what the interior of our planet looks like.  There's a whole lotta seismographic data that gives us a pretty damn clear picture of what Earth's innards are, in a pretty detailed fashion.  Hint:  it ain't hollow.

 

So, in summary, we have to decide which of the following to believe:

  1. The laws of physics, and many decades of scientific observations.
  2. One random old guy, who claims, with no evidence whatsoever, that he did this thing.

Other folks can make up their own minds, of course, but I know where I'd put my money.  :wink:

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MMMmmm... the troll is strong with this one!

...must  

...resist 

...responding

GAHHH!

Fine, you win.

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16 minutes ago, cratercracker said:

At least this is not flat earth crap...

Hu??? Cuz' every smart people who already waked up knew the Earth isn't totally flat... if it WaSn't the case so hOw caN ze boats could float, hu??? Smart peoples like us already knew everything is a plot from the SPECTRE of Ernst Blofeld who, from the 943rd basement of the Area-51 top-secret base, is sending his orders to the sioni... erhm, sorry, to the Zionist top secret base behind the dark side of our not totally flat Moon. They then use satellites to send top-secret waves to the others to control them! And truly everything is a plan from the Illuminatis, but hopefully we, the smart peoples, know that only the aluminium fold helmet can save us.

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38 minutes ago, Snark said:

Even if you could have a hyper-dense, hyper-strong hollow shell, and if you can ignore the zero-gravity-inside problem, then if there's an opening to the interior, we'd all be dead.  Because our atmosphere would all drain down into the interior and we'd be sucking vacuum.

What if, there already was a lot of air on the inside of the hollow shell, and our atmosphere (atmotorus?) was just the upper layer of it?  Then at least we wouldn't suffocate.

Admittedly then the interior wouldn't be overly breathable from overpressure and prone to ignition from huge amounts of oxygen, but we wouldn't suffocate, right?

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8 minutes ago, 1101 said:

What if, there already was a lot of air on the inside of the hollow shell, and our atmosphere (atmotorus?) was just the upper layer of it?  Then at least we wouldn't suffocate.

Admittedly then the interior wouldn't be overly breathable from overpressure and prone to ignition from huge amounts of oxygen, but we wouldn't suffocate, right?

Actually, it would have to be water on the inside, 'coz our oceans would drain out, too, otherwise.

But wait!  That can't be so!  Otherwise, ol' Grandpa's story about an air-filled interior would have to be a tall tale, and we all know that Grandpa would never pull his grandkids' legs!  Nice old guy like that would never do such a thing.

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Eh, lets just say the Core and Mantle decided to form with the Crust, somehow not destroying the planet. Getting inside the planet in the first place is hard enough, going through a core hotter than the core of the sun is a whole new level.

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Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, Snark said:

This would be your grandfather, who was either delusional or (more likely) just pulling your leg.

There are a lot of physical reasons why "hollow Earth" is impossible, as has been pointed out in this thread.  What your grandfather describes is physically impossible:

  • Gravity would be zero inside such a hollow shell.
  • The hollowness of the shell would require the shell itself to be improbably dense.
  • For an Earth-sized, Earth-mass planet to be a hollow shell and not collapse under its own weight, it would have to be improbably strong.
  • Even if you could have a hyper-dense, hyper-strong hollow shell, and if you can ignore the zero-gravity-inside problem, then if there's an opening to the interior, we'd all be dead.  Because our atmosphere would all drain down into the interior and we'd be sucking vacuum.
  • And in any case, we do in fact know what the interior of our planet looks like.  There's a whole lotta seismographic data that gives us a pretty damn clear picture of what Earth's innards are, in a pretty detailed fashion.  Hint:  it ain't hollow.

 

So, in summary, we have to decide which of the following to believe:

  1. The laws of physics, and many decades of scientific observations.
  2. One random old guy, who claims, with no evidence whatsoever, that he did this thing.

Other folks can make up their own minds, of course, but I know where I'd put my money.  :wink:

First off, I completely agree with you. The concept is soundly disproven by science and observation.

But, just for fun and the sake of intellectual discussion of the concept of a hollow earth, I provide the following counters, point by point.

- At the geometric center of the shell, there would be a null-g zone, due to the gravity of the surface/shell pulling on you equally from all directions. At the inner surface, there WOULD be gravity. Exactly how much depends on several factors, but could vary from barely more than freefall to more than 1 G.

- I cannot counter this one at present... but lack of evidence of such a material is not an evidence of lack. For all we know, there could be a layer of neutronium down there somewhere we haven't gotten down to yet.

- We don't know what the mechanical and structural properties of such a neutronium-like material really are. for all we know, it could withstand such forces. Again, just because we haven't seen it, doesn't mean it exists.

- Uhm... first you're saying that there'd be a zero gravity field, but now you're saying that there's enough gravity to suck out ALL our atmosphere (or water)? Make up your mind and consolidate your position. Again, depending on the precise conditions, it's quite probable that there would in fact be a equilibrium point that would allow the inner and outer surface to share an atmosphere at the opening. As the OP stated, there would be some really funky gravity fields at the transition point, but nothing that would be insurmountable. It's even possible that the ocean would be continuous across the opening, if it's of the correct geometry. I'm no physics major, but I'd imagine that a thin but long portal would provide the best results in this regard.

- We don't have a "clear picture". We have an interpretation of what's going on based off of time-of-flight data from seismic events. If the unobtainium that forms the structural and gravitational backbone of the planet has the correct properties, and is layered right, it's entirely possible that it could transmit seismic waves in a way that is consistent with the observed data.

 

To reiterate, I'm not a believer in the whole "hollow earth" concept... but I'm pointing out how it could be possible.

Edited by MaverickSawyer
typos

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10 minutes ago, MaverickSawyer said:

- At the geometric center of the shell, there would be a null-g zone, due to the gravity of the surface/shell pulling on you equally from all directions. At the inner surface, there WOULD be gravity. Exactly how much depends on several factors, but could vary from barely more than freefall to more than 1 G

No, there wouldn't.  There would be zero gravity everywhere inside the hollow shell, not just at the center.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shell_theorem

More discussion here:

 

11 minutes ago, MaverickSawyer said:

- I cannot counter this one at present... but lack of evidence of such a material is not an evidence of lack. For all we know, there could be a layer of neutronium down there somewhere we haven't gotten down to yet.

No, there couldn't, because neutronium isn't stable unless you've got a neutron star's worth of pressure and gravity keeping it that way.

Sure, if you want to just wave your hands and say "There's a magical sci-fi thing that happens so that none of the science or observations the human race has made will apply here," you can do that and nobody can prove you wrong.  :)  But then this isn't a "discussion", it's a "fairy tale" and argument is pointless because all assertions are met with "because magic".

15 minutes ago, MaverickSawyer said:

- We don't know what the mechanical and structural properties of such a neutronium-like material really are. for all we know, it could withstand such forces. Again, just because we haven't seen it, doesn't mean it exists.

There's no particular reason to think that neutronium is a solid with a high tensile strength.  If anything, it's likely a hyper-dense liquid.

In any case, your argument is "maybe magic!", so fine, whatever.  :P

16 minutes ago, MaverickSawyer said:

- Uhm... first you're saying that there'd be a zero gravity field, but now you're saying that there's enough gravity to suck out ALL our atmosphere (or water)? Make up your mind and consolidate your position.

Nope, no contradiction at all.  There is positive gravity outside the shell.  There's zero gravity inside.  The air/water above would pour down inside into the interior.  It's how physics works.  If you don't believe me (or Isaac Newton), go do the shell integral over the surface yourself-- it's actually reasonably straightforward, just basic calculus.

The gravity in question is one full Earth gravity, because that's what the air/water aboveground is experiencing.  And it would suck ALL of it, because all of the interior of the shell is gravitationally downhill from the exterior of the shell, and the volume of the interior is vastly hugely larger than the volume of our atmosphere and oceans.

19 minutes ago, MaverickSawyer said:

Again, depending on the precise conditions, it's quite probable that there would in fact be a equilibrium point that would allow the inner and outer surface to share an atmosphere at the opening.

Nope, that's not how gravity works.  The entire interior is gravitationally downhill from the entire exterior.

19 minutes ago, MaverickSawyer said:

As the OP stated, there would be some really funky gravity fields at the transition point, but nothing that would be insurmountable. It's even possible that the ocean would be continuous across the opening, if it's of the correct geometry.

Nope.

19 minutes ago, MaverickSawyer said:

I'm no physics major,

That's okay, 'coz I am.  :wink:

20 minutes ago, MaverickSawyer said:

- We don't have a "clear picture". We have an interpretation of what's going on based off of time-of-flight data from seismic events. If the unobtainium that forms the structural and gravitational backbone of the planet has the correct properties, and is layered right, it's entirely possible that it could transmit seismic waves in a way that is consistent with the observed data.

No, not really.  A hollow shell would have different characteristics.  You just can't get the kind of seismic patterns with a hollow shell as you can get with a solid one.  Doesn't work.

 

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... huh. Didn't know about the shell theorem bit. Learned something new today. How 'bout that. :wink:

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Probably an aurora. The picture, that is.

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