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Chinese Space Program (CNSA) & Ch. commercial launch and discussion


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42 minutes ago, Codraroll said:

North Korean slogan.

Well you know, DPRK is our ‘Blood Alliance’ so it’s nothing weird that they seems like us:ph34r:

I think one of the reasons why put so many words on there would be: We can’t put commercial advertisements on there because we got laws to ban it. And is too weird that leave these place blank. Ask someone to draw something on there would be too expansive. So, slogan, put the slogan on there!

Actually, this kind of thing can be worst: once there have a interview about the women soldier in SWAT. There have a slogan backed to her said: Training Counter Terrorist Elite (打造反恐精兵). The character of ‘打’ was not in the camera, and the ‘恐’ was covered by this soldier. And what we saw the slogan in the interview was ‘Rebellious Elite (造反精兵)’:huh:

Spoiler

76-E5-B8-AC-C4-E8-4-CC1-9-E69-573-DCF841

“I used to have a nice job but…”

Edited by steve9728
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21 hours ago, Codraroll said:

Heh, that's one of the cultural things that are different to understand on the other side of the world: the fixation with what we perceive as overly long and detailed slogans. A Western company might put "Seriousness, reliability, safety" as core values somewhere in a document of project values, but rarely more than three individual points, and it'd be seen as overly cheesy to put it on a banner.  Writing your goals and aspirations in huge letters on the side of a wall would be quite unthinkable. 

At least it's even worse in North Korea. "We must work with supreme diligence to execute the plan of the 49th workers' party congress and produce more potatoes to feed the motherland!" or stuff like that seems to decorate every wall over there. If you can say it in a single breath, it's not a proper North Korean slogan.

I don’t think this has anything to do with culture. It’s political. *cue mods gasping*

In Japan our political slogans are just as straight and to the point as Western ones. Even the Japanese Communist Party’s are rather simple. This is despite having certain cultural aspects similar to our communist neighbors.

If you look at a picture of any Stalin-era Soviet parades on the Red Square, you will see a very long placard, sometimes consisting of a single slogan stretching all the way across the State Department Store (the other side of the procession across from Lenin’s Mausoleum). China and North Korea adopted this one way or another at some point.

Note that in the Republic of China- both prior to and since 1949- political slogans were/are fairly similar to whatever was common at the time in the West.

———

Getting back to space related stuff…

Here is a neat video showcasing China’s first atomic bomb detonation, first hydrogen bomb detonation, first MRBM (including a nuclear test), and finally, China’s first satellite, Dong Fang Hong (The East is Red)* 1 (the space part, yay!). It is set to… music, not too bad but different from as advertised.

Disco apparently has a different meaning in China. The PLARF once released a promo video supposedly featuring disco music, and an OSINT dude remarked it was definitely not disco as we know it in the Western bloc.

*Before anyone makes a comment about long winded names… I personally don’t think that’s the case. It only seems that way because “translations” are at times rather garbagy and while they do capture the detailed meaning, there is a simplicity that is lost somewhere too. In Japanese (and presumably Chinese) this is not what would be considered a “sentence” in a Western language, but is more of a phrase-like word with meaning, like how in English one can call someone an “explorer” instead of “a man/woman who travels to new places in search of discoveries”. It’s just that English is not as flexible as Asian languages at times so 东方红/東方紅 jp btw not traditional cn gets translated as a literal sentence instead of the far more simple phrase it actually is, because there is just no equivalent in English.

Similar examples can be found in Japanese late WWII aircraft names. The C6N 彩雲 (Saiun) is a “phrase-like word with meaning”, but in English is the somewhat long winded (for an aircraft) C6N Iridescent Cloud. I imagine there are other Chinese examples too.

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3 hours ago, SunlitZelkova said:

I don’t think this has anything to do with culture. It’s political. *cue mods gasping*

Try not to break the rule: I think it have both of them. For example, in the classroom of high and senior high schools. You can see many slogen about must study harder kind of things. Is that political? It can't reach that. But in the launch center or somewhere the troop's trainning site, can we saying that there is no political element at all in this? The answer also would be 'no' either.

Much of this is a cultural and political 'inertia': my master's master did it, so when it's my master's and my turn, then we'll do it too.

3 hours ago, SunlitZelkova said:

I imagine there are other Chinese examples too.

In the age of the telegraph, Chinese could be compressed to the maximum extent possible and still give a full description of what was happening. Let's take an example that doesn't sound good: send a telegram to my brother about 'Dad has died, come home quickly for the funeral'. A Chinese telegram could be: 父亡速归 (translate directly: father died, come home quickly). In the telegraphic era, each Chinese character was referred to using a 4-digit number. This undoubtedly saved a great deal of time in transmitting information and, because every word of the telegraph was not cheap, a certain amount of cost was saved at the same time.

Spoiler

the number of this telegram can be:

3637
0072
6643
2981

Almost every Chinese character can have a story, and because a single character can contains so much information that some definite article is needed to indicate what the character is describing. But this kind of thing does not only occur in Chinese-English or Japanese-English translations, it often occurs in translations from English to Chinese as well. For example, I'm quite getting used of English's "which is... who is..."that thing. And there's no similar way to say that in Chinese. So often I need a little time to warm up my 'Chinese module' when I'm chatting to my friends back home after I've finished writing my school essay report or something like that.

Edited by steve9728
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15 minutes ago, Beccab said:

Uhhhh

I have not done any research on this company. Anyway, from a personal point of view, whenever I see any of new domestic private aerospace company, my reflex is "What's another clever excuse to get the big bosses to inject money?"


Alright, this one isn't someone making big rocket or something but the little satellites. I find them offical webside and I believe they are focusing on the high resolution satellites constellations. The satellites seem to be civilian gadgets for particularly peaceful purposes. Perhaps this isn't a quite good excuse to get the money and they can't afford a good desginer for their logo hahaha

Spoiler

The typical application scenarios they claim for their satellites are:

  • Marine Target Detection

    Using current advanced marine target interpretation algorithms or technologies, target monitoring is carried out for the Yangtze estuary and coastal marine vessel targets and their possible illegal oil discharges or oil spills at sea, providing information support for marine monitoring supervision and forensics.

  • Marine Oil Spill Monitoring

    Using a combination of visible and infrared wavelengths to enhance oil film information, we can quickly respond to oil spill incidents to locate the oil film zone, assess the oil spill area and ship burning smoke area, etc., providing efficient technical support for an emergency response such as maritime centres.

  • Unauthorised building monitoring along metro lines

    Provides monitoring services for changes in the environment around the metro transport routes, detecting changes in significant buildings along with the metro, identifying new buildings, demolished buildings and large construction projects, unauthorised rubbish deposition, etc.

  • Land Use Classification

    Land use classification is extracted for the Yangtze River Delta Integration Demonstration Area, including types of arable land, forest land, rural residential land, urban residential land, rivers, lakes, public construction land, commercial land, and mudflats, grassland, railways, rail transit, and unused land.

  • Smart Agriculture

    The integrated use of satellite remote sensing 3S technology and cloud computing technology to achieve the "eye in the sky" inspection of crop types and area changes within the plot, can provide objective, high-quality spatial data cloud services for agricultural management departments, agricultural research institutes, agrarian insurance companies and other units.

  • Monitoring of crop planting surface distribution

    Based on HDSAT data, the remote sensing dynamic monitoring algorithm is built to monitor the distribution of planting surfaces within crop plots and regularly update the information of typical crop plots, which is used to provide important references for business decisions such as contract signing, insurance and loans for farmers.

  • Water Environment Monitoring

    Using high-resolution remote sensing image processing technology, the quantitative inversion model algorithm of pollutants in water bodies is established to achieve the monitoring of suspended matter content, water transparency, chlorophyll-a, dissolved organic matter and other indicators as well as monitoring of water quality disasters such as cyanobacterial blooms.

  • Power station wire tower monitoring

    The use of stereo satellite image data covering the region to survey power projects in remote areas with complex terrain, inconvenient traffic and lack of information, provides a new way of line selection, optimal design and section collection for power transmission lines.

 

see, how peacefully they are:ph34r:

Edited by steve9728
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After all the plagiarism, here's something that's essentially technically original: the Beijing Institute of Spacecraft System Engineering has applied for a new patent called "Airship protection cover capable of being repeatedly unfolded and folded". I think it may be use on the new manned spacecraft in future.

This one got 'offically machine translation' (sounds weird). So I think it's easily for everyone to find the details about it.

jDQ2HiDiL4emFl7DqaFQnQd3Z1ieq1LQy3iNiYuv

ikYgbcXKV92R4PuuDzw3CEOcd-jUbwlStDfjEoGU

 

Edited by steve9728
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8 hours ago, Beccab said:

Uhhhh

In China maps are state secret, so mapping is illegal for any private individual/organization, and by extension building and launching any satellite capable of observing the Earth. Similar for providing telecommunication. There is simply no market space for a real private space company.

The China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation is really a PLA branch reorganized as a company (I think in the early 90's).

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1 hour ago, TheFlyingKerman said:

In China maps are state secret, so mapping is illegal for any private individual/organization, and by extension building and launching any satellite capable of observing the Earth. Similar for providing telecommunication. There is simply no market space for a real private space company.

It's not exactly illegal, only if you don't declare to government departments to be regulated. After all, Chinese people also drive and have to use navigation apps. You may find "Eh why, why doesn't the road network on the satellite image of the Chinese map match up with the road network in the picture?" That's because there is a law that states that the latitude and longitude coordinates used for satellite images are Mars coordinates.

Here it is the one of the major navigation app's provider: AutoNavi (高德) Map's satelite map demo. People can buy the service for such as the map for the agricultural protection drones, truck routing for freight companies and so on. 

Why there's no 'real private space company'. Firstly, objectively speaking, there are still gaps in China's space technology. Secondly, private spaceflight may not even be able to make a solid rocket if it does not receive technical and policy support from the state or the local government. Finally, perhaps it's a cultural difference, but in China anyway, to do something similar without government regulation people will think you are doing something nefarious and unscrupulous. Come on, if one day there have several cars that you'll know it's a Chinese mapping company's by a quick glance driving around in America communities nearly everywhere, and who knows how many their satellites focusing the America communities. Then they claim that they are mapping America without any kind of US gov's supervision. What you think?:D

Edited by steve9728
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16 hours ago, steve9728 said:

Come on, if one day there have several cars that you'll know it's a Chinese mapping company's by a quick glance driving around in America communities nearly everywhere, and who knows how many their satellites focusing the America communities. Then they claim that they are mapping America without any kind of US gov's supervision. What you think?:D

Eh, the Russians have been doing the same for decades. The Germans did too. The British before them. Mapping other countries is kind of a thing.

On 6/24/2022 at 8:31 PM, Beccab said:

Uhhhh

I wonder whether the explanation was that they didn't know any better, or that they didn't care. Either way, there's absolutely no way in which this makes "SAST" look any better in the eye of the competent beholder. 

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Looks like the Shenzhou-14 crew has cleaned and tidied up the room now:

00:16: they are unboxing a new grapple fixture for the robotic arm!

 

In terms of the schedule, the Tianzhou-3 cargo ship probably will leave the station in couple of weeks. And leaves the forward docking port for the Wentian module.

Edited by steve9728
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