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The_Instigator00

How not to land a SpaceX core

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On 2/13/2018 at 3:27 PM, Kuszotke said:

Solution: MechJeb!

Don't need mechjeb. In navball surface mode you can just set radial-out and the rocket will try to point vertically (I think this is a relatively new change to the SAS modes).

Edited by blakemw

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On 14/02/2018 at 12:37 AM, blakemw said:

Don't need mechjeb. In navball surface mode you can just set radial-out and the rocket will try to point vertically (I think this is a relatively new change to the SAS mods).

But isn't that radial out relative to your orbit?  If so that would put you side-on to the ground.

Edited by pandaman

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53 minutes ago, pandaman said:

But isn't that radial out relative to your orbit?  If so that would put you side-on to the ground.

You leave it surface retrograde until just before you land.  Switch it to radial out just as you touch down.

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57 minutes ago, Geonovast said:

You leave it surface retrograde until just before you land.  Switch it to radial out just as you touch down.

Ok. I get it now, at that point as you are slowly dropping vertically, your 'orbit' trajectory is narrow and the ship is on the Pe, so radial out is 'up'.

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Well, at least you did not miss your target by 100 meters an hit the water at 484 km/h. :-)

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Running in the 90s music intensifies

That kids, is why you always point retrograde when landing!

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On 2/15/2018 at 10:09 PM, pandaman said:

But isn't that radial out relative to your orbit?  If so that would put you side-on to the ground.

It seems to have been a change in 1.3 so when the navball is in surface mode radial out is relative simply to the surface meaning always straight up regardless of your velocity. And normal is north (aiming at the horizon) and anti-normal is south. In 1.2 and earlier I believe radial out (etc) would use orbital velocity. Suffice to say it is infinitely more useful now on/near the surface.

I also have a hunch that it's an undocumented change, I just noticed it working this way.

Edited by blakemw

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