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So... Kerbal parachutes...


Lo var Lachland
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Is there anyway to just "remove" Kerbal Parachutes from the Kerbal model?

First off, they're big and annoying, and when you deploy them, you can try all you want, but steering it (for me) always ends in a kernel's death.

 

I don't like them, I don't want them. PLEEEASE tell me if there's a confg file or something I can edit. 

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On 3/29/2018 at 11:26 AM, Lo Var Lachland said:

Is there anyway to just "remove" Kerbal Parachutes from the Kerbal model?

First off, they're big and annoying, and when you deploy them, you can try all you want, but steering it (for me) always ends in a kernel's death.

 

I don't like them, I don't want them. PLEEEASE tell me if there's a confg file or something I can edit. 

Lo Var Lachland,

 I haven't tried it, but there is a section in the kerbalEVA.cfg defining the parachute module and lifting surface. You could try taking them out and seeing what happens, but be sure to keep a copy of the originals stashed so you can revert if necessary.

Best,
-Slashy

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Kerbal parachutes are easy to control, if only for me who is very experienced in minecraft elytra gliding. You dive a little to gain speed, and pull up to use it, only the parachutes would be clearly designed for gliding a little. I use em very well. Just set the altitude to 5000 so that if you are low in flight you immediately glide. Try using them like that ;D. 

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7 minutes ago, GoSlash27 said:

Lo Var Lachland,

 I haven't tried it, but there is a section in the kerbalEVA.cfg defining the parachute module and lifting surface. You could try taking them out and seeing what happens, but be sure to keep a copy of the originals stashed so you can revert if necessary.

Best,
-Slashy

Thanks much. I'll give it a try. 

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The only real problem with the parachutes is landing them, and I recently flew one (for the very first time) and landed Jeb with a little tumble, but no explosion.  The key is, just as in any deadstick landing, the flare.  You have to pitch up slightly just before touchdown; this will trade off forward speed to reduce sink rate -- both of which you want to reduce.  If you hold level or barely below level heading on the nav ball, you can confirm the sink rate gets below 5 m/s, and if you can keep that figure while the forward speed also bleeds off to 5 m/s or so, you'll get a safe landing.  Once again, I did it my first time ever using a Kerbal parachute, so it can't be that difficult.

There does seem to be some interaction between your camera view and the "steady state" glide angle of the parachute -- if you set the camera lower relative to your Kerbal, you'll see the nav ball's prograde marker rise (it'll generally be a little below your view angle -- put the Kerbal on the horizon and the prograde marker will be a few degrees below).  This will let you control the steady state speed, which makes it much easier to reduce both forward speed and sink rate in the flare.

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9 hours ago, Zeiss Ikon said:

The key is, just as in any deadstick landing, the flare.

^ This.

It becomes especially important on Duna, where cruise speed at a stable glide is like 50 m/s due to the thin air.  If your kerbal touches down while going 50 m/s, he is having a bad problem and will not go to space today (or anywhere else, ever again):wink:

Whereas, with a well-executed flare, even on Duna the touchdown speed can get under 10 m/s and a safe landing is perfectly doable.  The kerbal may ragdoll a bit, but will be unharmed.

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10 hours ago, Lego_Prodigy said:

One, nice tardigrade image. two, I have found that lifting up a little during landing helps, as it decreases the hit speed a little more, and helps you land by slowing the downward descent a little.

That's pretty much a textbook definition of a "flare" in landing.  Raise the nose to bleed off speed while cutting sink rate.  Ideally done without "ballooning" into a temporary climb, as that can lead to a "drop" landing.

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