p1t1o

Shower thoughts

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Moar ma-geek...
Say, we have a pool or a cup of water, or even a spit, +20°C.

Let's froze a little bit of it into a tiny ice ball.

Spoiler

It will require to take away 20 K * 4200 J/(kg*K) + 330 kJ/kg = 20 * 4200 * 330 000 ~= 456 kJ/kg.

But due to the conservation law, we should save this energy somewhere.

Let's boil a tiny amount of waterr next to the ice ball.
This requires ~= (100 - 20) K * 4 200 J/(kg*K) + 2 260 kJ/kg = (100 - 20) * 4 200 + 2 260 000 ~= 2596 kJ/kg.

I.e. per 1 g of ice we get ~0.18 g of overheat water steam compressed to 1 000 kg/m3 density.
According to the table, at +370°C its density is just 200 kg/m3, and pressure is 210 atm.
So, we can roughly presume the steam is ~1000°C and ~1000 atm, It's almost a tiny volume of explosive net to the ice ball, pushing it like an ice bullet.

Say, ~1/3 of this energy is turned into kinetic energy of the ice ball.
Then the ice bullet velocity ~= sqrt(2 * 456 000 / 3) ~= 550 m/s. Like a pistol bullet.

A rubber bullet energy is ~100 J, a pistol bullet ~500 J.
Corresponding diameter of an ice ball is ~ ((100..500) / (456 000 / 3) / 1000 / (4 * pi) * 3)1/3 ~=6..9 mm.

So, just mageekally redistributing energy in a cherry-sized volume of water you can shoot with spits or turn any pool into  a machine-gun.
And it's just physics!

Edited by kerbiloid

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Shower thought: The current version of KSP would be 0.33.3 if version numbers were never skipped.

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