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ProtoJeb21

HATS-70b — because someone said Hot Jupiters couldn’t get any weirder

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I always think that, when a bizarre Hot Jupiter with star-like temperatures or glass rain or clouds of sunscreen is discovered, we have reached a limit to how utterly weird these planets can get. Time and time again, I am proven wrong. HATS-70b continues this trend. 

This Hot Jupiter is so large and so hot it can’t even really be called a Hot Jupiter. HATS-70b is a 13 Jupiter mass object orbiting a luminous A-class main sequence star every ~1.8 days, resulting in an equilibrium temperature in excess of 2,700 K and an insolation nine thousand times greater than Earth. Something like this would easily fall into the new Ultra Hot Jupiter category, and its mass means it’s likely a Super-Jupiter or a small brown dwarf. HATS-70b is also probably the hottest and “puffiest” object of its mass, not only with a temperature hotter than TRAPPIST-1, but with a density of “just” 6.6 g/cm^3 and a radius 40% greater than Jupiter’s. Brown dwarfs and Super-Jupiters are so massive that they should be crushed to 1 Jupiter radius, but this one gets so much heat that it’s enough to overcome its own powerful gravitational force. That doesn’t mean its gravity is weak — HATS-70b has a surface gravity somewhere around twenty gees, easily enough to crush your legs into rubble and render your unconscious if there was a solid surface to stand on. All this planet has is a thick, superheated atmosphere likely filled with plasma water, metal vapor, and molten rain, not unlike other planets of this temperature range. You can read all about this abomination here: https://arxiv.org/pdf/1811.06925.pdf

I wonder how long it’ll take for something even more ridiculously absurd and horrifying to be discovered and make this look normal. Probably a few months at the most. 

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Bizarre system indeed. Compared to it, our own little corner of space looks very cozy and peaceful. And science-fiction writers thought Mercury Venus is the most awful place :D Also... sunscreen clouds? I've read about planet with glass rain, but this is new to me.

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10 hours ago, ProtoJeb21 said:

... 13 Jupiter mass object orbiting a luminous A-class main sequence star every ~1.8 days...

Holy crap. Do they not, like, sucked in, or burned out ? Is there any limit on these (like, idk, roche limit of sorts, or vaporization limit of sorts) ?

Also, I wonder whether there are stars that shouldn't be stars but is one because of proximity to another star... or is there a density difference ?

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I believe the "sunscreen clouds" are referring to the detection of titanium dioxide in some exoplanet atmosphere.   

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I seem to recall a quip about "not only is the universe stranger than we imagine, it's stranger than we can imagine."

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1 hour ago, MaverickSawyer said:

I seem to recall a quip about "not only is the universe stranger than we imagine, it's stranger than we can imagine."

"There is a theory that states that if ever anyone discovers exactly what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable."
--Douglas Adams, The Restaurant at the End of the Universe

I thought this was a fitting quote. The universe is so enormous and statistically improbable that we will probably never figure everything out. A while ago we thought TRAPPIST-1 was weird, but now this 'Super-Jupiter' has come along and blown that out of the water.

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On 11/19/2018 at 5:55 AM, ProtoJeb21 said:

plasma water

Isn't this called "hydrogen and oxygen ions"...

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20 hours ago, YNM said:

Holy crap. Do they not, like, sucked in, or burned out ? Is there any limit on these (like, idk, roche limit of sorts, or vaporization limit of sorts) ?

Also, I wonder whether there are stars that shouldn't be stars but is one because of proximity to another star... or is there a density difference ?

it helps being an huge planet with strong gravity as it easier to keep the atmosphere. 

We have found some idiotic dense planets who sounds like partial degenerated matter, 20 kg/ L is an very high density and its hard to imagine an planet only of heavy elements so more probably that an gas giant lost its atmosphere and you ended with the solid core. 

Wonder if an star could puff up an brown dwarf or even red dwarf and then steal its atmosphere. This is however more common the other way around then the large star become an red giant. 

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1 hour ago, magnemoe said:

20 kg/ L is an very high density and its hard to imagine an planet only of heavy elements so more probably that an gas giant lost its atmosphere and you ended with the solid core. 

Actually, red dwarfs have a very high average/overall density - if my calculations (and the data available) were correct, Van Biesbroeck's star has a density of 23.75 g/cm^3.

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Spoiler
2 hours ago, magnemoe said:

We have found some idiotic dense planets who sounds like partial degenerated matter, 20 kg/ L

Osmium planets!

 

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4 hours ago, kerbiloid said:
  Reveal hidden contents

Osmium planets!

 

Soooo... Kerbin, then? rofl.gif

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On 11/19/2018 at 8:25 AM, ProtoJeb21 said:

You can read all about this abomination here

Aww don't be mean to Little Hats just because he is a bit different than the others. 

Spoiler

Me, to HATS: Mr. Hats, would you like to join the Kopernicus School for Gifted Planets? Would you like to be.... a X-Planet!?

 

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