kmMango

New Theory of Dark Matter And Dark Energy Utilizing Negative Masses

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The whole dark matter halo bit is interesting and I hope Dr. Farnes is able to continue his research. His model already displayed a lot of unexpected behavior (gravitational particle pairs accelerating each other to the speed of light almost never happen, for instance). It would be interesting to see if it could explain other dark matter observations.

Could a lack of electromagnetic interaction be responsible for the motion of the dark matter halos? I would imagine that that is the main component of drag. Also, his paper claims that gravitational attraction between negative masses and positive is possible, keep that in mind.

Edited by kmMango

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I think it's even wackier hypothetical solution than dark matter itself. These things are just fancy way of saying: "Let's invent a particle to fit with what we don't know". If I had a coin for every time a physicist did this, I'd have a lot of coins. :rolleyes:

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16 hours ago, sevenperforce said:

There is negative pressure.

 

What do you mean?

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We need imaginary number mass particles. They are fun.

Wait... Oh... 

Tachos?

Edited by kerbiloid

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Something else weird about this theory: if galaxies are being pushed apart by this, the universe itself isn't really expanding, just the galaxies are being moved.  So where are the galaxies, well, going, in this theory?      

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39 minutes ago, DAL59 said:

Something else weird about this theory: if galaxies are being pushed apart by this, the universe itself isn't really expanding, just the galaxies are being moved.  So where are the galaxies, well, going, in this theory?      

It's still metric expansion.

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On 12/6/2018 at 5:00 AM, kmMango said:

Off topic, but every time I read one of your comments I do it in Brain's voice and it's hilarious.

Also, why would you assume we would easily find this sort of substance in particle physics? We have yet to find gravitons despite decades of work, neutrinos took 30+ years to find, and these are particles predicted by our current model whose predicted properties we can design tests around. If this negative fluid exists, it is something not currently in the Standard Model by my understanding, and nobody has been explicitly looking for it either. Add in the fact that it would likely have little or no electromagnetic interaction, and is likely only present in very small amounts in our neck of the woods, and it seems to me that finding this stuff would be similar to finding someone else's contact lens in a dark room by pure chance.

Gravitons are massless, and have no charge other than due to stress-energy. A particle with negative mass will have to have a charge other than gravitational. So we know it's going to interact with other particles in some form or another. Which means that it ought to be produced in particle accelerators, and since it's not massless and it does interact, we ought to be detecting it. We aren't. So something fishy is going on there.

On 12/6/2018 at 5:54 AM, Rakaydos said:

That depends on the assumption that negative matter is attracted to positive matter. I linked to work being done on a way to have negative matter in physics that DOESNT give us a perpetural motion machine.

Oh, it's not perpetual motion. You can't get any energy out of it. What it is is a linear gyro. A device that can store a lot of momentum without going anywhere. It will also saturate, like any proper gyro, so there are limits to how far you can push it. But if it buys you a single orbit around a planetary body, you can use it to transition to any other orbit by just paying mechanical energy cost of it. Alternatively, stuff some momentum on it, and send your ship gently spinning on longitudinal axis. You now have gravity on your ship.

Edited by K^2

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8 hours ago, K^2 said:

Gravitons are massless

Gravitons are hypothetical. Hypotheses evolve.

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always wonder if dark matter has anything to do with the lack of antimatter.

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