Pipcard

Hatsunese Space Program - HASDA (RSS/RO) | 1965-03-09 | First launch of Negi-2 (max. 300 kg to LEO, retconned)

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Hatsunia is a country that exists in a parallel universe in the place of Japan. It became a democratic constitutional monarchy in 1868. In the late 19th century, the Micronesian islands were purchased from Spain, being called Mikuroneshia (pronounced with a mee-, not my-) in Hatsunese. This would be the only territorial acquisition by Hatsunia; no annexation of Korea, Taiwan, or anything else. Instead of becoming a militarist and ultranationalist empire, Hatsunia stayed a democracy and joined the Allies during WWII.

(edit: moved captions above images)

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In the early 1950s, a facility for testing sounding rockets and missiles was built on the island of Negishima (3.9°N, 139°E) in the autonomous prefecture of Parao. It was coincidentally shaped like a green onion.

(imaginary island made by editing EarthHeight.dds and EarthSurface.dds)

This location was selected because a proposal for the site on the mainland brought concerns from the fishing industry that rocket launches could disrupt harvests, resulting in a limited period for launching rockets (190 days a year). It was also selected for the potential of orbital launches due to the faster rotation of the Earth near the equator.

Sounding rockets would be tested by the Rocket Development Promotion Headquarters of the Hatsunia Science and Technology Agency in cooperation with the Institute of Industrial Science at the University of Miraito. In 1962, this division would eventually become the Hatsunia Aerospace Science and Development Agency, or HASDA. Hidemi Utagawa was a key figure in the development of Hatsunese rocketry.

 

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1956-08-31 01:39:00 UTC (10:39:00 Hatsunia Standard Time)

Lift-off of Negi-A, the first sounding rocket of Hatsunia

aLuNPjL.png

Diameter: 339 mm
Height: 7.1 m
Wet mass: 958 kg
Dry mass: 213 kg
Propellant: Solid
Specific impulse: 220 s
Thrust: 28.2 kN
Burn time: 57 s

Used Procedural Parts, B9 Procedural Wings, and NEBULA Decals

captions provided by Historian Expanded with a custom config

Spoiler

15 seconds, already 2 kilometers above the launch facility

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Rising above Negishima

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Burnout of solid motor

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Breaking the Karman line

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Reaching a maximum altitude of 307 km

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Edited by Pipcard
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I'm loving this, @Pipcard! I'm making a Career mission report myself, and I just want to say, this is really well done!

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List of Negi-A launches from 1956-08-31 to 1957-07-09:

K2teBGg.png

SRP (Sounding Rocket Payload) expressed in liters; each SRP is 0.5 kilograms. All Negi-A rockets carried a thermometer, barometer, and telemetry equipment.

[With Kerbal Construction Time at the minimum build rate, each rocket takes only 8-9 days to build, but Japan did not launch sounding rockets over 40 times a year, so I assumed 39 days between launches. Also, range safety (self-destruct) is activated after the rocket reaches its target altitude for contract gameplay purposes; the apogee is the altitude above Earth it would have reached.]

Notable launches:

(edit: moved captions above images)

Spoiler

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Negi-A-08 had a record-setting 173 kg of payload carried to 100 km.

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Negi-A-09 would be the last flight of this sounding rocket. Carrying 75 kg of payload to 200 km pushed the Negi-A to its limits. A new kind of rocket was being prepared for the International Geophysical Year.

lsMaVFB.png

 

Edited by Pipcard
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Negi-B comparison to Negi-A

Ro7PvqT.png

(stats assume no payload or recovery equipment)

Diameter: 539 mm
Height: 9.7 m
Wet mass: 3191 kg
Dry mass: 609 kg
Propellant: Solid
Specific impulse: 220 s
Thrust: 93.9 kN
Burn time: 59.3 s

List of Negi-B launches from 1957-08-31 to 1958-04-11

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SRP = Sounding Rocket Payload units, IMS = Ion Mass Spectrometer, Bio = Biological payload, (R) = Payload recovered with parachutes

Notable launches:

(edit: moved captions above images)

Spoiler

All launches of the Negi-B had a decoupler and parachutes for the payload. Each modular payload container could hold 100 liters of payload instead of 30.

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The payload had an Ion Mass Spectrometer to measure the composition of the atmosphere for the International Geophysical Year.

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The payload re-entered the atmosphere and was recovered after using parachutes.

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The second launch carried mice and life support equipment 361 km above the Earth.

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The third launch carried 275 kg of miscellaneous payload to almost 248 km.

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Edited by Pipcard
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The Negi-C sounding rocket was simply a Negi-A stacked on top of a Negi-B.

8p0GKZ8.png

(stats assume no payload and the configuration shown in the image)

Total wet mass: 4137 kg
Height: 16.2 m

1st stage diameter: 539 mm
1st stage wet mass: 3141 kg
1st stage dry mass: 560 kg
1st stage thrust: 93.9 kN
1st stage burn time: 59.3 s
Propellant: Solid
Specific impulse: 220 s

2nd stage diameter: 339 mm
2nd stage wet mass: 996 kg
2nd stage dry mass: 251 kg
2nd stage thrust: 28.2 kN
2nd stage burn time: 57.0 s
Propellant: Solid
Specific impulse: 220 s

List of Negi-C launches from 1958-05-17 to 1959-12-10

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SRP = Sounding Rocket Payload units, GMC = Geiger-Müller Counter

Notable launches:

Spoiler

The first and second launches carried a Geiger-Müller Counter to measure radiation levels in the upper atmosphere

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The second launch (as well as subsequent launches) used the 100-liter modular payload containers.

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The sixth and eleventh flights carried 475 kg of payload.

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The twentieth and final flight occurred on 1959-12-10.

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Edited by Pipcard
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The Negi-D sounding rocket had a new upper stage with the same diameter as the lower stage.

anFfRgE.png

(stats assume no payload and the configuration shown in the image)

Total wet mass: 4905 kg
Height: 14.5 m

1st stage diameter: 539 mm
1st stage wet mass: 3141 kg
1st stage dry mass: 560 kg
1st stage thrust: 93.9 kN
1st stage burn time: 59.3 s
Propellant: Solid
Specific impulse: 220 s

2nd stage diameter: 539 mm
2nd stage wet mass: 1764 kg
2nd stage dry mass: 402 kg
2nd stage thrust: 53.9 kN
2nd stage burn time: 57.2 s
Propellant: Solid
Specific impulse: 231 s

List of Negi-D launches from 1960-01-13 to 1961-05-25

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SRP = Sounding Rocket Payload units

Notable launches:

Spoiler

Most launches carried 470 to 475 kg of payload.

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Sixteenth and final launch carrying 295 kg of payload

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Edited by Pipcard
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 The Negi-E sounding rocket had almost twice the diameter of the Negi-B, C, or D. This would eventually become the first stage of an orbital launch vehicle. A dedicated space agency was planned to be established in late 1962.

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Diameter: 1039 mm
Height: 14.6 m
Wet mass: 14661 kg (with no payload)
Dry mass: 2474 kg
Thrust: 539 kN
Burn time: 48.8 s
Propellant: Solid
Specific impulse: 220 s

List of Negi-E launches from 1961-08-17 to 1962-04-26

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SRP = Sounding Rocket Payload units, Cam = Film Camera (pretend that there are other scientific instruments because this is 1961, not 1951), (R) = Payload recovered with parachutes

Notable launches:

Spoiler

Lift-off on 1961-08-17 - Each modular payload container can hold 675 liters.

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At apogee:

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Parachute recovery

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All of the launches were identical to each other.

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Edited by Pipcard
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On 1962-10-01, the Hatsunia Aerospace Science and Development Agency was established, being spun off from the Hatsunia Science and Technology Agency. An orbital launch was planned to occur in less than two years.

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The Negi-F sounding rocket added a second stage to the Negi-E. The maximum achievable altitude was approximately doubled.

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Total wet mass: 20725 kg (with no payload)
Height: 19.4 m

1st stage diameter: 1039 mm
1st stage wet mass: 14560 kg
1st stage dry mass: 2373 kg
1st stage thrust: 539 kN
1st stage burn time: 48.8 s
Propellant: Solid
Specific impulse: 220 s

2nd stage diameter: 1039 mm
2nd stage wet mass: 6165 kg
2nd stage dry mass: 1102 kg
2nd stage thrust: 239 kN
2nd stage burn time: 47.9 s
Propellant: Solid
Specific impulse: 231 s

List of Negi-F launches from 1962-07-17 to 1963-03-20

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SRP = Sounding Rocket Payload units

Notable launches:

Spoiler

Lift-off on 1962-07-17

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Second stage at 447 km

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Final launch on 1963-03-20

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Edited by Pipcard
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The Negi-G sounding rocket had a third stage. The second flight and onwards used a guided avionics package. Although this only increased the maximum altitude by 25% (without avionics), this rocket would be the final step before the launch of HASDA's first satellite.

W1oq1y0.png

Total wet mass: 22646 kg (with avionics and no payload)
Height: 21.5 m

1st stage diameter: 1039 mm
1st stage wet mass: 14560 kg
1st stage dry mass: 2373 kg
1st stage thrust: 539 kN
1st stage burn time: 48.8 s
Propellant: Solid
Specific impulse: 220 s

2nd stage diameter: 1039 mm
2nd stage wet mass: 6065 kg
2nd stage dry mass: 1001 kg
2nd stage thrust: 239 kN
2nd stage burn time: 47.9 s
Propellant: Solid
Specific impulse: 231 s

3rd stage diameter: 1039 mm
3rd stage wet mass: 2021 kg
3rd stage dry mass: 539 kg
3rd stage thrust: 83.9 kN
3rd stage burn time: 40.0 s
Propellant: Solid
Specific impulse: 231 s

List of Negi-G launches from 1963-06-10 to 1964-05-23

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SRP = Sounding Rocket Payload units

Notable launches:

Spoiler

First launch on 1963-06-10

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The second launch on 1963-09-05 used guided avionics (in between the payload and the solid motor) and didn't require spin-stabilization.

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Final launch on 1964-05-23

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Posted (edited)

1964-08-31 - The first satellite of HASDA was launched on the Negi-1 rocket. It was called "HATSUNE" (High Altitude Test Satellite Utilizing New Experiments) and acted as the fourth stage of Negi-1.

(Hatsune Miku now added to the comparisons)

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The satellite carried a micrometeorite and gravitational perturbation detectors, telemetry equipment, and a thermometer. [the probe core itself is a custom mesh]

[Note that there is a bug in which the procedural SRBs keep playing the burning sound when loading in from the tracking station, but they don't produce thrust. Also, the nozzle disappears because the solid stage has no fuel.]

5I4Mtyu.png

Total wet mass: 22849 kg
Height: 19.4 m

1st stage diameter: 1039 mm
1st stage wet mass: 14560 kg
1st stage dry mass: 2373 kg
1st stage thrust: 539 kN
1st stage burn time: 48.8 s
Propellant: Solid
Specific impulse: 220 s

2nd stage diameter: 1039 mm
2nd stage wet mass: 6065 kg
2nd stage dry mass: 1001 kg
2nd stage thrust: 239 kN
2nd stage burn time: 47.9 s
Propellant: Solid
Specific impulse: 231 s

3rd stage diameter: 1039 mm
3rd stage wet mass: 2019 kg
3rd stage dry mass: 535 kg
3rd stage thrust: 83.9 kN
3rd stage burn time: 40.0 s
Propellant: Solid
Specific impulse: 231 s

4th stage (HATSUNE) diameter: 350 mm
4th stage (HATSUNE) height: 1580 mm
4th stage (HATSUNE) wet mass: 193 kg
4th stage (HATSUNE) dry mass: 42 kg
4th stage (HATSUNE) thrust: 13.9 kN
4th stage (HATSUNE) burn time: 24.6 s
Propellant: Solid
Specific impulse: 231 s

Fairing mass: 12 kg

Launch images:

Spoiler

Liftoff

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Second stage:

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Third stage (with hydrazine tanks):

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Fairing jettison:

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The third stage used hydrazine RCS thrusters for spin stabilization before igniting the final stage.

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HATSUNE jettisons to achieve orbital velocity

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Final orbit: 2522 x 339 km

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Edited by Pipcard
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Posted (edited)

Just a quick question - was HATSUNE an acronym or a backronym? 

Backronym -> (HATSUNE becomes High Altitude Test Satellite Utilizing New Experiments)

Acronym -> (High Altitude Test Satellite Utilizing New Experiments becomes HATSUNE)

Loving this mission report!

Edited by RocketMan-Explorer
clarification

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Pretty sure it started as, "How can I turn the virtual popstar Hatsune Miku into a KSP campaign?"

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You're probably right. Probably. But either way, I can't wait to see how this mission report continues.

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Posted (edited)

1965-03-09 - The first flight of the Negi-2 launch vehicle, with a maximum capacity of 300 kg to a low Earth orbit of 250 km. Almost all of its four stages used solid propellant, but the third stage used liquid propellants: UDMH (unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine) as the fuel, and IRFNA (inhibited red fuming nitric acid) as the oxidizer. Its first satellite was called "Tanryoku" (淡緑, pale green), a technology testing satellite developed by students at the University of Miraito (pale green being the school's official color, although the satellite itself wasn't that color). Tanryoku had a mass of 125 kg and was the first Hatsunese satellite to use solar panels.

DBZHFUG.png

(Launch vehicle comparisons from now on will include a sample payload with "gold foil"-like insulation.)

Total wet mass: 52729 kg (assuming no payload)
Height: 22.9 m

1st stage diameter: 1.58 m
1st stage wet mass: 33634 kg
1st stage dry mass: 5451 kg
1st stage thrust: 1339 kN
1st stage burn time: 51.6 s
Propellant: Solid
Specific impulse: 250 s

2nd stage diameter: 1.58 m
2nd stage wet mass: 14550 kg
2nd stage dry mass: 2844 kg
2nd stage thrust: 539 kN
2nd stage burn time: 56 s
Propellant: Solid
Specific impulse: 263 s

3rd stage diameter: 1.58 m
3rd stage wet mass: 4329 kg
3rd stage dry mass: 542 kg
3rd stage thrust: 33.9 kN
3rd stage burn time: 4 m 58.5 s
Propellant: IRFNA/UDMH
Specific impulse: 272.5 s

(note: 3rd stage engine config is slightly modified from the AJ10-118-D)

4th stage diameter: 0.439 m
4th stage wet mass: 165 kg
4th stage dry mass: 81 kg
4th stage thrust: 13.9 kN
4th stage burn time: 15.6 s
Propellant: Solid
Specific impulse: 263 s

Fairing mass: 51 kg

Launch images (retconned, the pictures below did not happen):

Spoiler

Liftoff

8hZEMFQ.png

Second stage:

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Third stage (liquid):

akAR44e.png

Fairing jettison:

ukiwyEL.png

Spin stabilization:

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Fourth stage (kick motor):

zNg05wX.png

Deployment of Tanryoku (2069 km x 334 km, 67.4 deg inclination):

(antennae modified with Tweakscale)

ytG7uTE.png

Edited by Pipcard
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I have retconned the first launch of Negi-2. Since HASDA is based on the Japanese space program, there will be a rocket similar to the N-I (a license-built version of the Delta rocket, but in Hatsunia there would be less licensing and associated restrictions due to it having ). The first test satellite of N-I was called "Kiku," or chrysanthemum, after Japan's national flower. I was planning to name the Hatsunese equivalent "Neginohana" (葱の花, green onion flower), until I realized that it should also be the name of test satellites launched on the Negi rockets. Thus, I had to redesign the satellite and its appearance.

Also, the name of the liquid rocket engine on the third stage is LE-S1 for "Liquid Engine with Storable propellant"

Spoiler

Launch

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Second stage:

TQM6qMJ.png\

Third stage (liquid):

TEdJKJa.png

Fairing separation:

aXHPWQR.png

Spin-stabilization:

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Fourth stage:

fCBatP0.png

Final orbit of Neginohana - 1691 km x 334 km, 66 deg:

lZwro6z.png

 

Edited by Pipcard
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2 minutes ago, Ultimate Steve said:

Excellent job so far! Do you have an end goal for your campaign or nah?

There will be human landings on the Moon, space stations, and reusable rockets, but that's decades from now. Remember that the point of this is to emulate a slower, smaller space program than NASA or the Soviet space program.

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