Jump to content

[New] Space Launch System / Orion Discussion Thread


Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, mikegarrison said:

That doesn't change that it's kind of ridiculous.

Out of curiosity, why do you think it is ridiculous?

The Artemis I stuff is understandable, the toys are basically a PR stunt, and a zero-G indicator isn't really needed with no crew onboard.

But zero-G indicators have been common on spaceflight for 40 years. Looking it up now, it seems this actually dates back to Vostok 1 itself, with Gagarin taking a doll along with him.

How is it anymore ridiculous than any of the other non-science and flight operations related activities that take place in space?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's a simple form of engaging the public. It costs literally nothing, and generates interest with the flight, and connection with the crew on crew missions. All pros, no cons, IMHO.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Think of it this way: nobody really needed to see someone drop a feather and a hammer on the moon to see that Galileo was right, nor it was in any way necessary to play golf while there. Yet, 50 years later, it's a lot more likely that someone in the public knows about those parts of the mission than of ALSEP or even the Surveyor rendezvous

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Looks like the available launch dates could restrict to two soon. At least in case of a late abort on the 29th there should be time for a full recycle for Sep 2 considering it's four days later

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I understand that NASA wants to launch SLS immediately with Orion on August 29th. Orion will immediately fly into orbit of the Moon or into orbit of the Earth? I don't understand english well and didn't understand.

Edited by BezKartuza
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, BezKartuza said:

I understand that NASA wants to launch SLS immediately with Orion on August 29th. Orion will immediately fly into orbit of the Moon or into orbit of the Earth? I don't understand english well and didn't understand.

Lunar orbit (for 2 weeks I believe?) and then back to earth

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, tater said:

 

*ahem*

First it was claiming SLS is the most powerful rocket "ever", then it was claiming Orion was the first human capable craft to use a skip reentry, now again, NASA is at it with the desperate PR for Orion!

The farthest a human rated vehicle has flown is the Apollo 10 LM Ascent Stage which flew to and remains in solar orbit, which was actually human rated and carried humans at one point before embarking on its final flight.

The Artemis I Orion can not carry crew at all. I would hardly call it "human rated".

Orion will eventually carry humans "further than ever before", but only insofar as when they are onboard, otherwise Apollo 10's LM beats it as described. Artemis I just can't really claim any of those things, because it can't carry people and it doesn't have people onboard.

What Artemis I can claim fame to is taking Lego minifigures and Shawn the Sheep farther than they have ever gone before :lol:

Edited by SunlitZelkova
Grammar
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Following David Willis on Twitter, it seems like the Artemis Hype Train is finally rumbling to life...

Spoiler

 

This Bird may actually launch before summer is out?!? Finally!

Although, for the cost, they may as well have lined the flame trench with bricks of dollar bills...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Late, overpriced and somehow still less capable than venerable, 50 years old Saturn V.

Thanks, but I will pass on the ticket for this hype train. I will catch the one with actual human crew, if it ever arrives.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@Scotiusdon't be like that. After all this wait we have a chance to see live (or on TV) a demonstration flight of a technology from late 70s and early 80s. It is also fitting that Boeing is behind it, since they still produce airliners from that era.

 

SpaceX, Blue Origin and co. are all about pushing new technologies, being more efficient and actually making a profit. However stupid throwing absurd amounts of money on ancient tech may seem I think it is not thaaaaat bad of an idea to have some low(er) tech solutions on the line ready to be used. Shame that they are actually super expensive and take eternity to be built.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll watch it, my friend is working a few aspects of the flight, so I will get some behind the scenes stuff as well.

Just now, Scotius said:

Well, you are right. I missed Moon landings due to not being born yet. Now I have a chance to  watch the reenactment live. Yaay.

Except it can't actually do that mission, sadly.

Not every launch vehicle/spacecraft needs to be able to do "all the things," but if NASA is contracting for a huge, expensive vehicle it would be nice if it could at least do A thing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/9/2022 at 11:09 PM, SunlitZelkova said:

*ahem*

The farthest a human rated vehicle has flown is the Apollo 10 LM Ascent Stage which flew to and remains in solar orbit, which was actually human rated and carried humans at one point before embarking on its final flight.

Gesundheit!

What about that Tesla car?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Shpaget said:

Gesundheit!

What about that Tesla car?

Not human rated :sticktongue:

Otherwise Voyager 1 would be the most distant human rated object, because on Earth I can sit on it, and therefore under a definition of “human rated” which includes vehicles that can carry humans on Earth, Voyager 1 counts too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, SunlitZelkova said:

Not human rated :sticktongue:

Otherwise Voyager 1 would be the most distant human rated object, because on Earth I can sit on it, and therefore under a definition of “human rated” which includes vehicles that can carry humans on Earth, Voyager 1 counts too.

Oh, it was definitely human-rated. One can't just put together any contraption of seats and wheels and take it into traffic. Try riding the Voyager 1 down a highway, you would be pulled over for lacking some quite essential features (most notably, and probably quite puzzling to the cop who pulled you over, wheels). That Tesla design went through a rigorous approval process to ensure it fulfilled a variety of different criteria to be legally usable in traffic. That's human-rating even by a very strict definition of the term.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...